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Monday, June 30, 2014

6/30/14 Health News: MEDIUM-RARE BURGERS RISKY ♦ BAN ON ANTIBIOTIC USE ON FARMS ♦ CONGRESSWOMEN PROPOSE WOULD MAKE MEAT SAFER ♦ Mexico,s First Case of Chikungunya

MEDIUM-RARE BURGERS: A RISKY CULINARY COMEBACK
For those in the food industry, the Jack in the Box E. coli outbreak of 1993 is known as the single event that convinced burger joints across the country to raise their internal cooking temperature by 15 degrees. In that outbreak, hamburgers sold at Jack in the Box franchises predominantly in Washington state sickened more... Continue Reading
AMA SEEKS BAN ON ANTIBIOTIC USE ON FARMS FOR GROWTH PROMOTION
The American Medical Association (AMA) is calling for federal action to ban antibiotic use in food animals for growth promotion purposes so as to slow the development of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. “Use drives resistance and overuse drives resistance to happen even faster,” said David Wallinga, a physician on the Keep Antibiotics Working steering committee. There is... Continue Reading
 CONGRESSWOMEN PROPOSE SOLUTION TO ISSUE OF PATHOGENS AS ADULTERANTS
Reps. Rosa DeLauro (D-CT) and Louise Slaughter (D-NY) are introducing a bill in the House of Representatives that would give the Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) the authority to declare any foodborne pathogen an adulterant and recall contaminated products. The “Pathogen Reduction and Testing Reform Act” amends the Federal Meat Inspection... Continue Reading
Mexico Confirms First Case of Chikungunya Virus
A health official says Mexico has its first confirmed case of a person infected with a new mosquito-borne virus that has spread quickly in the Caribbean. Continue Reading

Australia: Connie's Kitchen Gourmet Tuyo Dried Herrings Recalled


Connie's Kitchen Dried Herring.JPG
Connie's Kitchen Gourmet Tuyo Dried Herrings packed in 235g packaging  and marked with EXP 04 14 15 The recall is due to biotoxin (histamine) contamination. Food products containing histamine may cause illness if consumed
The product was sold in New South Wales by Chinese and Filipino supermarkets in NSW only.  they were distributed by Nayon Import Export Pty Ltd
Consumers should not eat this product and should return the products to the place of purchase for a full refund.

For further information please contact: Nayon Import Export Pty Ltd on 0402 591 552

Sunday, June 29, 2014

Richard’s Rubs & Seasonings Recalls Sauces Because of Possible Health Risk


 Richard’s Rubs & Seasonings LLC is recalling Richard’s Too Good BBQ Sauce, Richard’s Too Good Hot Sauce and Richard’s Too Good Teriyaki Sauce because they have been improperly processed and because they have the potential to be contaminated with Clostridium botulinum, which can cause botulism, a serious and potentially fatal foodborne illness.
Foodborne botulism is a severe type of food poisoning caused by the ingestion of foods containing the potent neurotoxin formed during growth of the organism. Foodborne botulism can cause the following symptoms: general weakness, dizziness, double-vision and trouble with speaking or swallowing. Difficulty in breathing, weakness of other muscles, abdominal distension and constipation may also be common symptoms. People experiencing these problems should seek immediate medical attention. Consumers are warned not to use the product even if it does not look or smell spoiled.
The recalled sauces were sold in western Washington grocery stores and butcher shops in Kitsap, Snohomish and King counties.
Sauces are packaged in 12 oz tall glass bottles with metal screw caps and black heat resistant tamper seals.
The products being recalled were distributed up to the date of June 17, 2014. This recall has been initiated because of a consumer complaint indicating that sauce may have been improperly processed. Richard’s Rubs & Seasonings LLC has not been notified of any illness associated with their products.
Richard Mullen, owner of Richard’s Rubs and Seasonings, believes that “The health of our customers is a priority for our company, which is why we are working with the Washington State Department of Agriculture and a recognized process authorities, to take the steps necessary to ensure that our products continue to remain good tasting and are safe”
Consumers who have purchased recalled sauces are urged to return it to the place of purchase. Consumers with questions may contact the company at 206-854-7046 during the hours of 9AM to 5PM PST. Visit www.richardsrubsandseasonings.com for updates on this recall.
Richard’s Too Good BBQ SauceRichard’s Too Good BBQ Sauce Back
Richard’s Too Good Hot SauceRichard’s Too Good Hot Sauce Back
Richard’s Too Good Teriyaki SauceRichard’s Too Good Teriyaki Sauce Back

Saturday, June 28, 2014

6/28/14 Health News:Dangerous Are Energy Drinks ♦ Pain-relief cream caused a baby's death ♦ SEAFOOD GUIDANCE FROM THE FDA MAY NOT PROTECT CONSUMERS ♦ After Drug Resistance

Just How Dangerous Are Energy Drinks, Anyway?
After a day of sipping energy drinks on the beach in Rocky Point, Mexico, 16-year-old Lanna Hamann went into cardiac arrest and died on June 14.While the cause of Hamann’s death is still unknown, the potential dangers of caffeinated energy drinks like Red Bull, Monster and Rock Star have public health advocates worried -- and for good reason. Continue Reading
Pain-relief cream concoction, part of a $25M scam, inadvertently caused a baby's death
Southern California doctors were bribed to prescribe a pain-relief concoction as part of a $25 million workers' compensation scam that inadvertently caused a baby's death, according to indictments.Continue Reading
LATEST SEAFOOD GUIDANCE FROM THE FDA MAY NOT PROTECT CONSUMERS
Consumer advocates are concerned that the recently updated federal guidance encouraging pregnant women, nursing mothers and children to consume two to three servings of fish and shellfish a week oversimplifies its species recommendations. The Environmental Working Group (EWG) and the Mercury Policy Project (MPP), along with mercury researcher Philippe Grandjean, think that the Food and Drug Administration... Continue Reading
After Drug Resistance: The Alamo Today

San Antonio de Valero is a former Roman Catholic mission and fortress where the Battle of the Alamo occurred from February 23 until March 6, 1836. Now known simply as the Alamo, this compound has been damaged, ransacked, and renovated many times before work on its present configuration as a museum in downtown San Antonio, Texas, USA, was completed in 1968. Continue Reading

Canada: Harvest Brand Meat Products Recalled

Harvest Meats Co. Ltd. recalled the meats listed which contained unsuitable ingredients. These products were distributed in Alberta, British Columbia, Manitoba, Northwest Territories, Nunavut, Ontario, Quebec, and Saskatchewan through Hotel, Restaurants Institutions, and Retail.
Affected products
Brand Name
Common Name
Size
Code(s) on Product
UPC
Harvest
Bologna
Variable weight
Best Before 14 AU 15
None
Harvest
Bologna
375 g
Best Before 14 AU 15
0 57393 50013 6
Harvest
Summer Sausage
375 g
Best Before 14 SE 01
0 57393 70050 5
Harvest
Wieners
450 g
Best Before 14 AU 28
0 57393 60020 1
Harvest
Wieners
675 g
Best Before 14 AU 28, 14 AU 29
0 57393 60006 5
Harvest
Wieners
1.5 kg
Best Before 14 AU 28, 14 AU 29
0 57393 60062 1
Harvest
Barbecue Wieners
500 g
Best Before 14 AU 28
0 57393 60060 7
Harvest
Beer Sausage Sticks
375 g
Best Before 14 AU 18
0 57393 70161 8
Harvest
Garlic Coil Sausage
500 g
Best Before 14 AU 29
0 57393 70012 3
Harvest
Garlic Coil Sausage
1 kg
Best Before 14 AU 29
0 57393 70013 0
Harvest
Honey Garlic Sausage
300 g
Best Before 14 AU 29
0 57393 70076 5
Harvest
Jalapeno & Cheddar Sausage
300 g
Best Before 14 AU 28
0 57393 70077 2
Harvest
Pepperoni
375 g
Best Before 14 SE 01
0 57393 70041 3
Harvest
Salami
375 g
Best Before 14 AU 28, 14 SE 01
0 57393 70045 1
None
Wieners Bulk 5 kg PC
Variable weight
Best Before 14/AU/14 EST. 049
None
None
Polish Thin Garlic Stick 1/5 kg case
Variable weight
Best Before 14/AU/15 EST. 049
None

Friday, June 27, 2014

Recall-- Organic Ham Contains Plastic


Label, Recalled Product E. G. Emils & Sons, Inc., a Philadelphia, Pa. establishment, is recalling approximately 5,896 pounds of deli ham product that may be contaminated with extraneous materials, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced today.
The following product is subject to USDA recall:
  • “Wegman’s Food You Feel Good About Organic Ham,” Wegman’s Private Label with pack lot numbers 14941309, 14941310 and 14941311.
This product bears “EST 9935” inside the USDA mark of inspection on the labels and was produced May 29, 2014. The product was shipped to Wegman’s locations in Maryland, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania and Virginia to be sliced at deli counters. The organic ham was sold between June 12 and June 25.
The problem was discovered by a Wegman’s employee upon slicing the ham at the deli counter. The problem was traced to a piece of plastic that broke off from an interlocker belt.
Neither the company nor FSIS has received any reports of injury associated with consumption of this product. Anyone concerned about an injury or illness from consumption of this product should contact a healthcare provider.        
FSIS routinely conducts recall effectiveness checks to verify that recalling firms notify their customers of the recall and that steps are taken to make certain that the product is no longer available to consumers.  
Consumers with questions about the recall should contact E.G. Emils & Sons, Inc. at 215-763-9824. Media with questions about the recall should contact customerservice@emils.com.


Alaska’s Seafood is Safe from Fukushima Radiation

The Alaska departments of Environmental Conservation (DEC) and Health and Social Services (DHSS) have received results from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration on radiation testing of Alaska seafood. The results confirm information from federal, State and international agencies that seafood in the North Pacific and Alaska waters poses no radiation related health concerns to those who consume it.
The FDA is the lead U.S. agency in food safety. The agency has been monitoring radiation in both domestic and imported foods and determined that there have been no levels of Fukushima radiation in those foods that would pose a public health concern. However, Alaskans have insisted on Alaska-specific sampling and data. DEC and DHSS developed a sampling plan and coordinated with the FDA for them to analyze several Alaska fish species that are known to migrate from the western Pacific Ocean and that are harvested by commercial, recreational and subsistence fishers.
“We heard concerns from our neighbors, friends and other citizens throughout Alaska about the possible contamination of Alaska fish with the radiation releases from the Fukushima disaster,” DEC Environmental Health director Elaine Busse Floyd said. “We did not expect to find any problems with Alaska seafood based on federal monitoring of domestic and imported foods. However, we felt that it was important to assist the FDA by developing a sampling plan and obtaining Alaska fish to be tested. The data reassures us and other Alaskans for whom seafood is such a critical part of life in Alaska.”
The testing found no detections of the Fukushima-related radioisotopes Iodine-131, Cesium-134, or Cesium-137. There was some detection of background or naturally-occurring radiation. The results indicate no appreciable risk from any tested radionuclide in these fish. DEC and DHSS have posted the findings on their websites.  
All samples were analyzed by standard techniques routinely used by the FDA to evaluate food safety. The fish samples were composites, containing tissue from several fish, and were collected using a statistical protocol. Samples were collected across the state from the Aleutian Islands/Bering Sea to Southeast Alaska.
DEC continues to collaborate with its partners, including DHSS, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium, Cook Inlet Keeper, North Slope Borough, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, FDA, and others to continue to compile and evaluate additional environmental sample data.

You Can Help Reduce Antibiotic Resistance

A new WebMD/Medscape survey found that some clinicians reported antibiotic prescribing habits that may contribute to the public health crisis of antibiotic resistance. Additionally, the survey found that about 1 in 4 patients (23%) has asked their physician, nurse practitioner, or physician assistant for an antibiotic.

It is estimated that minimum  2,049,442 illnesses, and 23,000 deaths (bacteria and fungus included) are caused annually by antibiotic resistance
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports that each year, in the United States, at least 2 million people become infected with bacteria resistant to antibiotics and at least 23,000 people die as a direct result of antibiotic-resistant infections. According to CDC Director Tom Frieden, “Its clear we’re approaching a cliff with antibiotic resistance. But it’s not too late. Clinicians and healthcare systems need to improve prescribing practices. And patients need to recognize that there are both risks and benefits to antibiotics – more medicine isn’t best, the right medicine at the right time is best.”
CDC has a variety of resources to help providers and patients use antibiotics wisely.
Provider Resources
Patient Education Materials
Resources for Healthcare Systems