Google+ Badge

Saturday, August 30, 2014

Grated Parmesan Cheese recalled Due to Salmonella

Label, 4C Grated Cheese, 100 percent Natural Parmesan, 6 oz. 4C Foods Corp. is recalling its 6-oz. glass jars of "4C Grated Cheese Home Style Parmesan", UPC 0-41387-32790-8 with code dates BEST BY JUL 21 2016 and JUL 22 2016 due to possible contamination with Salmonella. This recall does not impact any other 4C cheese products.
Salmonella is an organism that can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems. Healthy persons infected with Salmonella often experience fever, diarrhea, nausea, vomiting and abdominal pain. In rare circumstances, infection with Salmonella can result in the organism getting into the bloodstream and producing more severe illnesses.
On July 24, 2014, Product was distributed to: IA, IL, MI, MN, ND, NE, SD, and WI through retail stores.
Item is packed as 12 glass jars per case, code dates BEST BY JUL 21 2016 and JUL 22 2016 can be located on jar back side toward bottom portion.
Consumers do not need to return the product to the store where it was purchased. Instead, consumers are urged to dispose of the recalled product and its container. Please contact 4C Foods at 1-718-272-7800 ext. 176, Monday – Friday, 9:30 AM to 4:30 PM (Eastern Time), for a replacement or full refund and for general inquires.

8/30/14 Health News: Food safety suspect in the UK ♦ Test could determine if your food is really organic ♦ CABBAGE LIKELY CAUSED MINNESOTA’S E. COLI OUTBREAK

Food safety still suspect in the UK
The U.K. government has delayed publication of an official report into the causes of the horse meat scandal until at least the fall. This has prompted fears that it is not doing enough to protect consumers from food security issues and is trying to hide the fact. Continue Reading
A new test could determine if your food is really organic

A new test could determine if your food is really organic AFP Relaxnews | 2014-08-29 10:21:56.0 Researchers could be on their way to a test that could put organic food shoppers at ease. Slapping on the "organic" label to inflate the price of produce might become a thing of the past thanks to researchers from the Bavarian Health and Food Safety Authority and the Wuerzburg …continue reading
CABBAGE LIKELY CAUSED MINNESOTA’S E. COLI O111 OUTBREAK

The 15 cases of E. coli O111 reported in Minnesota this summer were likely linked to green whole head cabbage, says the state’s health department. Health officials’ routine monitoring identified the cases of illness associated with Shiga toxin-producing E. coli O111. Bacterial isolates from all of the cases had the same DNA fingerprint. The illnesses occurred... Continue Reading

Friday, August 29, 2014

Kraft American Singles Recalled

Label, Kraft Singles American Cheese, 16 SlicesKraft Foods Group is voluntarily recalling 7,691 cases of select varieties of regular Kraft American Singles Pasteurized Prepared Cheese Product. A supplier did not store an ingredient used in this product in accordance with Kraft’s temperature standards. While unlikely, this could create conditions that could lead to premature spoilage and/or foodborne illness; therefore, the company is issuing the recall as a precaution. The affected product is limited to four varieties with “Best When Used By” dates of February 20, 2015, and February 21, 2015.
The affected product was shipped to customers across the United States..
The following varieties are being recalled:
Product Size
Name of Product
Units/Case
Best When Used By Code Dates
Package Code
Case Code
12 oz.
12 oz Kraft American Singles (16 slices)
48
20 FEB 2015 and 21 FEB 2015
0 21000 60464 7
00 21000 60464 00
16 oz.
16 oz Kraft American Singles (24 slices) (36 count case)
36
20 FEB 2015
0 21000 61526 1
00 21000 61450 00
16 oz.
16 oz Kraft American Singles (24 slices) (12 count case)
12
20 FEB 2015
0 21000 61526 1
00 21000 61526 00
64 oz.
64 oz (4 lb) Kraft American Singles (4x24 slice)
8
20 FEB 2015
0 21000 63360 9
00 21000 62559 00
Consumers can find the “Best When Used By” dates on the bottom of the product package. No other Kraft Singles products are impacted by this recall.
The affected product was produced at Kraft’s Springfield, MO manufacturing facility.
Consumers who purchased any of these products should not eat them. They should return them to the store where purchased for an exchange or full refund. Consumers also can contact Kraft Foods Consumer Relations at 1-800-396-5512.
Label, Kraft Singles American Cheese, 16 Slices, Best When Used By Date

8/29/14 Health News: US Food Contain Ingredients Banned In Other Countries ♦ CYCLOSPORA LINKED TO CILANTRO ♦

80% of the Food in US Contain Ingredients Banned In Other Countries
In the book, authors Mira and Jason Calton provide a list of banned ingredients which they term "Banned Bad Boys" as well as the countries which have banned them. Among the items is Olestra - commonly used in low/no-fat snack foods and known to cause serious gastrointestinal issues - which has been banned in the United Kingdom and Canada.  Worse is brominated vegetable oil, a substance found in Mountain Dew and Fresca which has been banned in more than 100 countries. As the authors state, brominated vegetable oil "has been linked to basically every form of thyroid disease - from cancer to autoimmune diseases - known to man." Continue Reading
TEXAS CYCLOSPORA CASES LINKED TO MEXICAN CILANTRO
At least 126 Cyclospora-related illnesses in Texas reported this year have now been traced back to fresh cilantro imported from Mexico, according to the Texas Department of State Health Services. State and federal health officials revealed the source of the outbreak at the same time they announced that the outbreak was considered over. The case... Continue Reading
Protein-enriched aquaculture feed from sweet potato pushed
SWEET potato (Ipomoea batatas), locally known as kamote, is an important food crop. In some areas of the Philippines, it is a staple particularly among marginalized families in provinces, as they are easy to cultivate and relatively cost less than a kilo of rice.

One of the problems facing the aquaculture industry today is the high cost of fish feed. Nutritionists all over the world are constantly searching for the dietary protein sources of fish to maximize growth and increase production within the shortest possible time and at lowest Continue reading

New Zealand:Recalled Tartare Sauce

Groenz Ltd French Maid brand Tartare Sauce with a batch code of AB2403 and a Best Before Date of 01 January 2015 is recalled The tartare sauce was sold in a 2.3 kg plastic container for food service. It was sold throughout the North Island.
Pieces of clear plastic were discovered in the sauce. The sauce should not be consumed. return the sauce for a full refund.
Groenz Ltd,131 Gracefield Road, Lower Hutt
Ph: 04 5707634

picture of french maid tartare sauce

Psoriasis Treatments Are Getting More Personalized

The more scientists learn about psoriasis, the more therapeutic options are becoming available for patients with this skin disease.
“As we better understand the disease, researchers know more about what specific factors to target in order to develop effective treatments,” says Melinda L. McCord, M.D., a dermatologist at the Food and Drug Administration.
The treatment for psoriasis has changed from the previous gradual step-by-step approach. Today, doctors seek to optimize treatment from the first visit—whether with phototherapy or systemic therapies—based on the specific needs of each patient.
“Tomorrow’s treatments will become even more personalized because the drugs in development now are targeting different aspects of the immune system,” McCord notes.
Psoriasis is an immune system disorder characterized by inflammation and the rapid overproduction of skin cells, creating scaling, pain, swelling, heat and redness. About 7.5 million Americans have psoriasis, a skin condition that can create significant physical and emotional discomfort.
Therapies for psoriasis include:
  • Medicines applied to the skin (topical treatment)
  • Light treatment (phototherapy)
  • Drugs taken by mouth or injection (systemic therapy)
There is no cure for psoriasis, so the main goals of treatment are to reduce inflammation and to stop the skin cells from growing so quickly.
In the past, doctors treated psoriasis using a “step-wise approach.” Patients with mild to moderate psoriasis would start with topical therapies and, if they did not respond well to that, move on to other treatments, such as systemic therapy or phototherapy. This approach called for treating people with moderate to severe psoriasis with phototherapy or traditional systemic therapies—drugs such as methotrexate and cyclosporine—before offering them biologic therapies (a type of treatment that works with your immune system).
That strategy has changed to a more patient-specific approach. Today, patients and their doctors can choose a treatment based on its effectiveness, the severity of their disease, lifestyle considerations, risk factors, and associated diseases (co-morbidities).
The most recent biologic product approved by the FDA for the treatment of psoriasis is Stelara (ustekinumab). Ustekinumab contains an antibody that’s produced in a laboratory and designed to bind to a specific target in the immune system. “When given to patients, this antibody blocks the action of two proteins (interleukin 12 and 23) that contribute to the inflammation and the overproduction of skin cells. By targeting these proteins, ustekinumab can interrupt the inflammatory pathway,” McCord says.
“Looking forward, the drugs in development are targeting different pathways in the immune system that lead to inflammation. Researchers are exploring the importance of interleukin 17,” McCord says. “They’re also looking at proteins and molecules that can interrupt cellular signaling, which can increase the spreading of the inflammation.”
“As we learn more about the immune pathways that lead to the development of psoriasis, we can target specific molecules for treatment and make more therapeutic options available to patients,” McCord says. “Understanding the disease gives us the opportunity to target specific factors.”
McCord recommends a team approach to treating psoriasis. Patients, families and their health care providers need to work together to address the multiple diseases that may occur in association with psoriasis, including the risk of developing metabolic syndrome (the occurrence of obesity, high blood pressure, high cholesterol and diabetes in one patient), lymphoma, heart disease and/or depression. “We do not completely understand the relationship of these co-morbidities to psoriasis, but it is an area of active research,” she adds.
Because psoriasis is a chronic disease with no cure, patients may need to use treatments for a long time. Many therapies approved by FDA have been evaluated for extended time periods.
Psoriasis has environmental and genetic components. It is more common in adults and can run in families. What triggers it? A virus? Bacteria? Stress? Other environmental factors? “We just don’t know,” McCord says.
The good news is that patients can treat some of the signs and symptoms of psoriasis with simple measures. For example, regular use of moisturizers may improve the itching and scaling. Reducing or limiting tobacco use and alcohol consumption may decrease the number of flares of psoriasis. Lifestyle changes—such as maintaining a healthy weight and being physically active—may help lessen or prevent the development of associated diseases.
McCord advises patients to seek treatment early from a doctor experienced with the disease. A dermatologist can provide patients with the correct diagnosis and information to manage the disease. “If you are diagnosed and treated early, you may avoid the pitfalls of ineffective and inappropriate therapy,” she adds.
Some patients become easily discouraged about treatments, but newer therapies may make them more comfortable. That’s why McCord says patients should investigate treatment options early and educate themselves about their condition. Even if patients have a mild case of psoriasis and decide they don’t want a particular treatment option, there are ways they can decrease their symptoms.
“Psoriasis has a great emotional impact on some patients. But it doesn't have to, given the right care and treatment,” she says.

Thursday, August 28, 2014

Canada:L'Alpette cheese recalled due to a toxin produced by Staphylococcus bacteria

L'Alpette brand Soft ripened sheep cheese - 160 g Ferme Floralpe Inc. is recalling L'Alpette cheese from the marketplace because it may contain the toxin produced by Staphylococcus bacteria. Consumers should not consume the recalled product described below.
Recalled products
L'Alpette brand Soft ripened sheep cheese - Ingredients
Brand Name
Common Name
Size
Code(s) on Product
L'Alpette
Soft ripened sheep cheese
160 g
Lot 333
Best before: 14 10 31
This cheese was distributed in Ontario, Quebec
Check to see if you have recalled product in your home. Recalled product should be thrown out or returned to the store where it was purchased.
Food contaminated with Staphylococcus toxin may not look or smell spoiled. The toxin produced by Staphylococcus bacteria is not easily destroyed at normal cooking temperatures. Common symptoms of Staphylococcus poisoning are nausea, vomiting, abdominal cramping and fever. In severe cases of illness, headache, muscle cramping and changes in blood pressure and pulse rate may occur.


NIH to Launch Human Safety Study of Ebola Vaccine

Trial is First in Series of Accelerated Safety Studies of Ebola Vaccines
Initial human testing of an investigational vaccine to prevent Ebola virus disease will begin next week by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health.
The early-stage trial will begin initial human testing of a vaccine co-developed by NIAID and GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) and will evaluate the experimental vaccine’s safety and ability to generate an immune system response in healthy adults. Testing will take place at the NIH Clinical Center in Bethesda, Maryland.
The study is the first of several Phase 1 clinical trials that will examine the investigational NIAID/GSK Ebola vaccine and an experimental Ebola vaccine developed by the Public Health Agency of Canada and licensed to NewLink Genetics Corp. The others are to launch in the fall. These trials are conducted in healthy adults who are not infected with Ebola virus to determine if the vaccine is safe and induces an adequate immune response.
In parallel, NIH has partnered with a British-based international consortium that includes the Wellcome Trust and Britain’s Medical Research Council and Department for International Development to test the NIAID/GSK vaccine candidate among healthy volunteers in the United Kingdom and in the West African countries of Gambia (after approval from the relevant authorities) and Mali.
Additionally, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has initiated discussions with Ministry of Health officials in Nigeria about the prospects for conducting a Phase 1 safety study of the vaccine among healthy adults in that country.
The pace of human safety testing for experimental Ebola vaccines has been expedited in response to the ongoing Ebola virus outbreak in West Africa. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), more than 1,400 suspected and confirmed deaths from Ebola infection have been reported in Guinea, Liberia, Nigeria, and Sierra Leone since the outbreak was first reported in March 2014.
“There is an urgent need for a protective Ebola vaccine, and it is important to establish that a vaccine is safe and spurs the immune system to react in a way necessary to protect against infection,” said NIAID Director Anthony S. Fauci, M.D. “The NIH is playing a key role in accelerating the development and testing of investigational Ebola vaccines.”
“Today we know the best way to prevent the spread of Ebola infection is through public health measures, including good infection control practices, isolation, contact tracing, quarantine, and provision of personal protective equipment,” added Dr. Fauci. “However, a vaccine will ultimately be an important tool in the prevention effort. The launch of Phase 1 Ebola vaccine studies is the first step in a long process.”
“Tried and true public health interventions, strong supportive medical care and the rapid testing of Ebola vaccines and antiviral treatments can help to reduce suffering now and in the future,” said CDC Director Thomas R. Frieden, M.D., M.P.H.
The investigational vaccine now entering Phase 1 trials was designed by Nancy J. Sullivan, Ph.D., chief of the Biodefense Research Section in NIAID’s Vaccine Research Center (VRC). She worked in collaboration with researchers at the VRC, the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases, and Okairos, a Swiss-Italian biotechnology company acquired by GSK in 2013.
Phase 1 clinical trials are the first step in what is typically a multi-stage clinical trials process). During Phase 1 studies, researchers test an investigational vaccine in a small group of people to evaluate its safety and the immune response it provokes. Phase 2 clinical trials of investigational vaccines are designed to further assess safety and immune response in larger numbers of volunteers. Under certain circumstances, the vaccine’s ability to prevent infection or disease (called efficacy) can be determined in a Phase 2 trial. Phase 3 clinical trials are directed predominantly at determining efficacy.
The NIAID/GSK Ebola vaccine candidate is based on a type of chimpanzee cold virus, called chimp adenovirus type 3 (ChAd3). The adenovirus is used as a carrier, or vector, to deliver segments of genetic material derived from two Ebola virus species: Zaire Ebola and Sudan Ebola. Hence, this vaccine is referred to as a bivalent vaccine. The Zaire species of the virus is responsible for the current Ebola outbreak in West Africa.
The vaccine candidate delivers one part of Ebola’s genetic material to human cells, but the adenovirus vector does not replicate. Rather, the Ebola gene that it carries allows the cells of the vaccine recipient to express a single Ebola protein, and that protein prompts an immune response in the individual. It is important to know that the Ebola genetic material contained in the investigational vaccine cannot cause a vaccinated individual to become infected with Ebola.
“The experimental NIAID/GSK vaccine performed extremely well in protecting nonhuman primates from Ebola infection,” Dr. Fauci noted.
The candidate vaccine builds upon three earlier NIAID-developed investigational Ebola vaccines that began Phase 1 clinical trial testing in 2003.
“The knowledge gained from each of those trials has contributed to the development of the candidate vaccine we are now studying, as well as our improved understanding of human immune responses to investigational Ebola vaccines,” said John R. Mascola, M.D., director of NIAID’s Vaccine Research Center.
The Phase 1 clinical trial, called VRC 207, will be led by principal investigator Julie E. Ledgerwood, D.O., chief of the VRC’s clinical trials program, and will be conducted among 20 healthy adults ages 18 to 50 years. Participants will be divided into two groups of 10 participants each. One group will receive an intramuscular injection of the NIAID/GSK experimental vaccine. The second group will receive a single injection of the same vaccine but at a higher dose.
A number of safety features are built into the study’s design, including daily and weekly reviews of patient data by clinical staff and the study protocol team. Additionally, the trial features a staged enrollment plan that requires interim safety reviews after three participants have been vaccinated and have undergone three days of follow up before enrolling additional study participants into the group. Participants in both groups will be seen and evaluated by clinical staff nine times over a 48-week period.
Additional Phase 1 Tests of the NIAID/GSK Vaccine
As part of the VRC 207 trial, NIAID will also test a version of the NIAID/GSK vaccine that contains genetic material from only the Zaire Ebola species. Hence, this vaccine is referred to as a monovalent vaccine. This portion of the Phase 1 safety study, which will also involve 20 healthy adults, is expected to begin in October at the NIH Clinical Center and potentially another U.S. location. Dr. Ledgerwood will also lead that effort. The VRC 207 clinical trial is being conducted based on expedited review and approval by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.
In parallel, NIH has partnered with an international consortium that includes the British-based Wellcome Trust, as well as Britain’s Medical Research Council and Department for International Development to test the same NIAID/GSK monovalent vaccine candidate. The vaccine candidate will be tested among 60 healthy volunteers at the University of Oxford in England and among 40 healthy volunteers in Mali by the University of Maryland School of Medicine Center for Vaccine Development and its Center for Vaccine Development in Mali (a joint enterprise of the University of Maryland School of Medicine and the Ministry of Health of Mali). Additionally, the vaccine candidate is expected to be tested among 40 healthy volunteers in Gambia after approval from the relevant authorities.
The Oxford trial is expected to launch in mid-September pending ethical and regulatory approval.
“Today’s announcement shows how private and public partners can pull together to quickly respond to this critical public health emergency. Developing a new vaccine is complex with no guarantees of success, and we are still in the early days for our Ebola vaccine candidate. But we are encouraged by progress so far and will do the best we can, along with WHO and our partners, to speed up development and explore ways in which the vaccine could contribute to this or future Ebola outbreaks,” said Dr. Moncef Slaoui, chairman of Global R&D and Vaccines at GSK.
Initial safety and immunogenicity data from the Phase 1 trials of the NIAID/GSK investigational Ebola vaccine are expected in late 2014.
Vesicular Stomatitis Virus (VSV) Ebola Vaccine Testing
The NIH will also collaborate with the U.S. Department of Defense in support of efforts by NewLink Genetics Corp., a biopharmaceutical company in Ames, Iowa, to conduct Phase 1 safety studies of the investigational recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus Ebola vaccine (called VSV-EBOV) developed by and licensed from the Public Health Agency of Canada. Those clinical trials are expected to begin in the fall at the Clinical Trials Center of Walter Reed Army Institute of Research in Silver Spring, Maryland.
For more information about these early-stage Ebola vaccine clinical trials, see Questions and Answers: Phase 1 Clinical Trials of NIAID/GSK Investigational Ebola Vaccine.

PEDIGREE® Adult Complete Nutrition Dry Dog Food Recalled

Label, Pedigree Adult Complete Nutrition Dog Food, Chicken Flavor, 15lb.Mars Petcare US announced a voluntary recall of 22 bags of PEDIGREE® Adult Complete Nutrition dry dog food products due to the possible presence of a foreign material. The bags were produced in one manufacturing facility, and shipped to one retail customer. The facility production line has been shut down until this issue is resolved.
Affected bags, which were sold between August 18 and August 25 in 12 Dollar General stores* in Mississippi, Arkansas, Tennessee and Louisiana, may contain small metal fragments, which could have entered the packages during the production process. The foreign material is not embedded in the food itself, but may present a risk of injury if consumed. We encourage consumers who have purchased affected product to discard the food or return it to the retailer for a full refund or exchange.The lot codes indicated below should not be sold or consumed.
Only 15-pound bags of PEDIGREE® Adult Complete Nutrition dry dog food sold at Dollar General in Mississippi, Arkansas, Tennessee and Louisiana with the production code shown below are included in this voluntary recall. Each product will have a lot code printed on the back of the bag near the UPC code that reads 432C1KKM03 and a Best Before date of 8/5/15. No other PEDIGREE® products are affected, including any other variety of dry dog food, wet dog food or dog treats.
UPC
DESCRIPTION
23100 10944
PEDIGREE® Brand Adult Complete Nutrition dry dog food in 15 pound bags
At Mars Petcare US, we take our responsibility to pets and their owners seriously. We sincerely apologize for any inconvenience caused by this recall. Pet owners who have questions about the recall should call 1-800-305-5206 or visit www.pedigree.com/update
*Affected product would only have been sold in Dollar General Stores in these cities:
  • Arkansas:
    • Perryville
    • cabot
  • Louisiana
    • Baton Rouge
    • Calhoun
    • Hineston
    • Jonesville
    • Pineville
    • Slaughter
  • Mississippi
    • Magnolia
    • Vicksburg
  • Tennessee
    • Memphis