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Thursday, October 31, 2013

10/31/2013 Daily Health News: Virus Fights Immune System, Flu Shots Help Heart, Skid Row Cancer Study,

Flu Virus Wipes Out First Wave of Immune Response
The immune system has the capacity to "remember" particular viruses and store those details in B memory cells that reside in the lungs to help ward off future infections. But a new study shows the flu virus takes advantage of this and uses the way the memory cells store its details to recognize and kill them, thus wiping out the immune system's first wave of defense against virus re-infection.Continue Reading
Flu Shots Tied to Lower Risk of Cardiac Events
Influenza vaccination was associated with a reduced risk of major adverse cardiovascular events among patients at high risk for heart disease, a meta-analysis showed.continue Reading


New Technology Lets Doctors Watch Patients From Afar
Many people carry or own devices that can act as sensors. Smartphones have accelerometers that can measure physical activities and advanced cameras that can provide evidence for interpretation. These devices are becoming more sophisticated; Microsoft's Kinect camera, for instance, can estimate blood pressure based on how flushed a user appears. Continue Reading


Decades Later, Condemnation for a Skid Row Cancer Study
A medical researcher from Columbia University, Dr. Perry Hudson, made the skid row alcoholics in Lower Manhattan an offer: If they agreed to surgical biopsies of their prostates, they would get a clean bed and three square meals for a few days, plus free medical care and treatment if they had prostate cancer. It was the 1950s, and Dr. Hudson was trying to prove that prostate cancer could be caught early and cured. But he did not warn the men he was recruiting that the biopsies to search for cancer could cause impotence and rectal tears. Or that the treatment should cancer be found — surgery to remove their prostates and, often, their testicles — had not been proven to prolong life.  Continue Reading


Potential Vaccine against early Childhood Pneumonia and Bronchiolitis

An experimental vaccine to protect against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), a leading cause of illness and hospitalization among very young children, elicited high levels of RSV-specific antibodies when tested in animals, according to a report in the journal Science.
Early-stage human clinical trials of the candidate vaccine are planned. The scientist built on their previous findings about the structure of a critical viral protein to design the vaccine. The team was led by Peter D. Kwong, Ph.D., and Barney S. Graham, M.D., Ph.D.
The respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is responsible for a common chidhood illness. There is no vaccine available to prevent RSV infection.
In the United States, RSV infection is the most common cause of bronchiolitis (inflammation of small airways in the lungs) and pneumonia in children less than one year old and the most common cause for hospitalization in children under five. Worldwide, it is estimated that RSV is responsible for nearly 7 percent of deaths in babies aged 1 month to 1 year; only malaria kills more children in this age group. Others at risk for severe disease following RSV infection include adults over age 65 and those with compromised immune systems.
“Many common diseases of childhood are now vaccine-preventable, but a vaccine against RSV infection has eluded us for decades,” said NIAID Director Anthony S. Fauci, M.D. “This work marks a major step forward. Not only does the experimental vaccine developed by our scientists elicit strong RSV-neutralizing activity in animals, but, more broadly, this technique of using structural information to inform vaccine design is being applied to other viral diseases, including HIV/AIDS.”
Viruses are made of proteins.For a vaccine to work there need to be a protein that is the same shape as the virus but will not cause illness. When The immune system comes in contact with the vaccine it learns to attack this protein. That way your immune system will attack the virus when it comes in concact with them.
“Here is a case in which information gained from structural biology has provided the insight needed to solve an immunological puzzle and apply the findings to address a real-world public health problem,” said Dr. Graham. He and the VRC scientists are continuing to refine the engineered F glycoproteins and hope to launch early-stage human clinical trials of a candidate RSV vaccine as soon as clinical grade material can be manufactured, a process that takes about 18 to 24 months.
“Previously, structure-based vaccine design held promise at a conceptual level,” said Dr. Kwong. “This advance delivers on that promise and sets the stage for similar applications of structure-guided design to effective vaccines against other pathogens.”
Dr. Fauci added, “This latest advance underscores the advantages of the VRC’s organizational design, where experts in RSV virology, vaccinology and clinical studies, such as Dr. Graham, are in daily contact with Dr. Kwong and others who are experts in structural biology. Such close collaboration across disciplines allows for rapid testing of new approaches to a given problem.”
Source NIH

Malaria Cases in U.S.Reach 40-Year High

Increase underscores importance of taking recommended medicines to prevent malaria when traveling
In 2011, 1,925 malaria cases were reported in the United States, according to data published in a supplement of the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR) released today by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). This number is the highest since 1971, more than 40 years ago, and represents a 14% increase since 2010. Five people in the U.S. died from malaria or associated complications.
Almost all of the malaria cases reported in the U.S. were acquired overseas. More than two-thirds (69%) of the cases were imported from Africa, and nearly two-thirds (63%) of those were acquired in West Africa. For the first time, India was the country from which the most cases were imported. Cases showed seasonal peaks in January and August.
“Malaria isn’t something many doctors see frequently in the United States thanks to successful malaria elimination efforts in the 1940s,” said CDC Director Tom Frieden, M.D, M.P.H. “The increase in malaria cases reminds us that Americans remain vulnerable and must be vigilant against diseases like malaria because our world is so interconnected by travel.”
Malaria is caused by a parasite transmitted by the bite of an infective female Anopheles mosquito. In 2010, it caused an estimated 660,000 deaths and 219 million cases globally. The signs and symptoms of malaria illness are varied, but the majority of patients have fever. Other common symptoms include headache, back pain, chills, increased sweating, muscle pain, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and cough. Untreated infections can rapidly progress to coma, kidney failure, respiratory distress, and death.
“Malaria is preventable. In most cases, these illnesses and deaths could have been avoided by taking recommended precautions,” said Laurence Slutsker, M.D., M.P.H., director of CDC’s Division of Parasitic Diseases and Malaria. “We have made great strides in preventing and controlling malaria around the world. However, malaria persists in many areas and the use of appropriate prevention measures by travelers is still very important.”
Travelers to areas with malaria transmission can prevent the disease by taking steps such as use of antimalarial drugs, insect repellent, insecticide-treated bed nets, and protective clothing.
Travelers in the United States should consult a health-care provider prior to international travel to receive needed information, medications, and vaccines. CDC provides advice on malaria prevention recommendations on-line (http://www.cdc.gov/malaria/travelers/drugs.html). If a traveler has symptoms of malaria, such as fever, headaches, and other flu-like symptoms, while abroad or on returning home, he or she should immediately seek diagnosis and treatment from a health-care provider.
Clinicians should consult the CDC Guidelines for Treatment of Malaria and contact CDC’s Malaria Hotline for case management advice, as needed. Malaria treatment recommendations can be obtained online (http://www.cdc.gov/malaria/diagnosis_treatment) or by calling the Malaria Hotline (770-488-7788 or toll-free at 855-856-4713).

Source CDC

Problems in Diagnosing Epilepsy

Many People with Epilepsy have more than one condition. If more physicians became aware of and understood how often adults with epilepsy reported other medical conditions, these physicians could then screen, diagnose, and treat these conditions to prevent complications in patients with epilepsy.
Epilepsy is a group of disorders all involving recurring seizures but of different types, causes, and severity. Epilepsy affects about 2.3 million U.S. adults. Adults with epilepsy more often report other conditions affecting the heart, lungs, skin, joints, and stomach, as well as pain complications compared to people without epilepsy.
If more physicians became aware of and understood how often adults with epilepsy reported these medical conditions, physicians could then screen, diagnose, and treat these conditions to prevent complications in patients with epilepsy. Physicians can also work with other healthcare providers, public health agencies, the Epilepsy Foundation, and other groups to ensure that adults with epilepsy can manage their epilepsy.
] In many cases a cause of Epilepsy cannot be identified; however, factors that are associated include brain trauma, strokes, brain cancer, and drug and alcohol misuse among others.
Nearly 80% of epilepsy occurs in developing countries. Epilepsy becomes more common as people age. Onset of new cases occurs most frequently in infants and the elderly. Epileptic seizures may occur in recovering patients as a consequence of brain surgery.
Epilepsy is usually controlled, but not cured, with medication. However, more than 30% of people with epilepsy do not have seizure control even with the best available medications. Surgery may be considered in difficult cases Not all epilepsy syndromes are lifelong – some forms are confined to particular stages of childhood. Epilepsy should not be understood as a single disorder, but rather as syndromic with vastly divergent symptoms, all involving episodic abnormal electrical activity in the brain and numerous seizures.
Source CDC

Italy Leading the Way to find Safer Alternative for BPA in Food Packaging


Finding alternatives and safer to replace endocrine disruptors, potentially hazardous substances and used in many areas including the food packaging: Endocrine disruptors are substances such as bisphenol A, (BPA),phthalates and parabens, technologically useful in the production of plastic but equally worrying for their ability to disrupt the endocrine system, putting consumers at risk.
European researchers are working to identify alternatives to the three groups of substances that are safer for the protection of human health and equally valid for industrial uses. There is already a list of potentially substitute, but often lack of data and studies on their possible toxicity.
Precisely for this reason, the first step of the project will be  to evaluate the actual endocrine disrupting activity of candidates for substitution.
The goal is to  identify three to five for each of the three groups of substances under consideration, and to assess the possible impact on product safety in the specific sectors considered (materials in contact with foodstuffs, cosmetics, plastics used in medical devices). The next step will be the evaluation of actual products and prototypes that will be compared with similar products currently in use.
source italy www.ilfattoalimentare.it/




Wednesday, October 30, 2013

Chinese Bats Likely Source of SARS Virus

,Scientists say they've produced "the clearest evidence yet" the SARS virus originated in Chinese horseshoe bats and that direct bat-to-human transmission is "plausible." The 2002 severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) pandemic was one of the most significant public health events in recent history and researchers have been studying the virus to better understand how it is transmitted to prepare for future outbreaks.

 
Photo by Dr. Libiao Zhang,
Researchers say the Chinese horseshoe bat is likely the source of the 2002 severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) pandemic.
An international research team - with participants in China, Australia, Singapore and the U.S. - has published its results in the journal Nature. "Our discovery that bats carrying SARS-CoV may be able to directly infect humans has enormous implications for public health control measures," stated co-author Dr. Peter Daszak, president of the New York-based EcoHealth Alliance.
The results are based on genetic analysis of samples taken over the course of a year from members of a horseshoe bat colony in Kunming, China. At least seven different strains of SL-CoVs were found to be circulating within the single group of bats. The findings highlight the importance of research programs targeting high-risk wildlife groups in emerging disease hotspots to predict, prepare for and prevent pandemics, the researchers suggest.
"Our findings suggest that SARS-like coronaviruses are diverse and abundant in bats in Asia, and the potential for future spillover remains high," Daszak noted. "If we add this to the recent finding that Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) originates in Saudi Arabian bats, it's strong evidence that bat coronaviruses remain a substantial global threat to public health."
source: Fogarty International Center

10/30/2013 Daily Health News Crypto Outbreak from Apple Cider, Genital Herpes, Breast Milk Fights HIV , Cholesterol in Womb Effects Adult

Johnson County Iowa- crypto outbreak from apple cider
A cluster of parasitic illnesses have hit Johnson County in the past week, leaving several ill; they were apparently caused by unpasteurized apple cider. Beginning in the week of Oct. 21, 11 outbreaks of cryptosporidiosis — also known as crypto — have been reported in Johnson County by people who have consumed the tainted cider.continue Reading


U.S. Teens More Vulnerable to Genital Herpes, Study Suggests
They may have lower levels of protective antibodies to the virus than in years past This increase in risk may be the result of fewer teens being exposed in childhood to the herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), a common cause of cold sores, researchers reported Oct. 17 in the online edition of the Journal of Infectious Diseases. Continue Reading


Scientists Uncover Breast Milk's Potential Secret Weapon Against HIV
A compound not previously thought to be a germ-killer may help shield babies from the virus. Experts have long suspected that breast milk may have the power to prevent babies from getting infected with HIV, and new research gives insight into why that might be so. Researchers say they've discovered a component of breast milk that appears to kill the virus that causes AIDS, potentially preventing some babies from becoming infected by their mothers.Continue Reading
Iron Supplements for Children Found Beneficial
A recent study found that iron supplements for children may be helpful in safely reducing their risk of anemia.Continue Reading
High Cholesterol in the Womb May Affect Adult Levels

The risk for high cholesterol in adults may be partly explained by intrauterine exposure to high cholesterol, researchers presenting a new study at the Canadian Cardiovascular Congress Using multi generational data from the Framingham Heart Study, they found that if mothers had high prepregnancy LDL levels  their offspring had a fivefold higher risk of having dyslipidemia themselves, as young adults Continue Reading

Syria: 10 Confirmed Cases of Polio

Following reports of a cluster of 22 acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) cases on [17 Oct 2013] in the Syrian Arab Republic, wild poliovirus type 1 (WPV1) has been isolated from 10 of the cases under investigation. Final genetic sequencing results are pending to determine the origin of the isolated viruses. Wild poliovirus had not been detected in the Syrian Arab Republic since 1999.
Most of the cases are very young (below 2 years of age), and were un- or under-immunized. Estimated immunization rates in the Syrian Arab Republic declined from 91 percent in 2010 to 68 percent in 2012.
Even before this laboratory confirmation, health authorities in the Syrian Arab Republic and neighbouring countries had begun the planning and implementation of a comprehensive outbreak response. On [24 Oct 2013], an already-planned large scale supplementary immunization activity (SIA) was launched in the Syrian Arab Republic to vaccinate 1.6 million children against polio, measles, mumps, and rubella, in both government-controlled and contested areas.
Implementation of an SIA in Deir Al Zour [Dayr az Zawr] province commenced promptly when the 1st 'hot cases' were reported. Larger-scale outbreak response across the Syrian Arab Republic and neighbouring countries is anticipated to begin in early November 2013, to last for at least 6 to 8 months depending on the area and based on evolving epidemiology.
Given the current situation in the Syrian Arab Republic, frequent population movements across the region and subnational immunity gaps in key areas, the risk of further international spread of wild poliovirus type 1 across the region is considered to be high. A surveillance alert has been issued for the region to actively search for additional potential cases.
WHO's International Travel and Health recommends that all travellers to and from polio-infected areas be fully vaccinated against polio.
Source http://www.promedmail.org/

Tuesday, October 29, 2013

Reser's Fine Foods RecallsMore Products Due to Listeria

 October 28, 2013 - Reser's Fine Foods, Inc. ("Reser's") initiated a recall of select products on October 22, 2013 due to the potential of those select products being contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes. On October 26, 2013, Reser's expanded its initial recall to cover a broader group of products. In response to that expanded recall, Taylor Farms Florida, Inc. ("TFFL"); Taylor Farms Illinois, Inc. ("TFIL"); Taylor Farms Maryland, Inc. ("TFMD"); Taylor Farms Texas, Inc. ("TFTX"); and Taylor Farms Tennessee, Inc. ("TFTN") are voluntarily issuing a secondary recall on a limited number of deli products that contain components implicated in Reser's expanded recall. The products subject to the recall are limited to the code dates provided. These products are being recalled because they have the potential to be contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes, an organism which can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems. Although healthy individuals may suffer only short-term symptoms such as high fever, severe headache, stiffness, nausea, abdominal pain and diarrhea, Listeria infection can cause miscarriages and stillbirths among pregnant women. To date, there have been no reported illnesses associated with these recalled items.
STORE
ITEM DESCRIPTION
BEST IF USED BY DATE
PRODUCTION FACILITY
STATES PRODUCT WAS DISTRIBUTED TO
Florida Food Service Inc.Broccoli Slaw Crunch Kit (Sold at Deli Counter)11/01/13, 11/03/13TFFLFlorida
SyscoBroccoli Slaw Crunch Kit (Sold at Deli Counter)10/23/13, 10/26/13, 10/27/13, 10/28/13, 11/01/13, 11/02/13, 11/03/13TFFLFlorida
Dominick'sSignature Caf� Italian Pasta Salad Kit (Sold at Deli Counter)10/23/13, 10/25/13, 10/27/13, 10/30/13, 11/1/13TFILIllinois
Ahold Financial ServicesBroccoli Crunch Salad Kit (Sold at Deli Counter)10/25/13, 10/26/13, 10/27/13, 10/28/13, 11/01/13, 11/02/013, 11/03/13TFMDMassachusetts
All Island Food Distributors CorpBroccoli Crunch Salad Kit (Sold at Deli Counter)10/25/13, 11/01/13TFMDNew York
All Island Food Distributors CorpDiced Summer Slaw Kit (Sold at Deli Counter)10/25/13, 11/01/13TFMDNew York
Associated Wholesalers Inc.Broccoli Crunch Salad Kit (Sold at Deli Counter)10/24/13, 10/26/13, 10/27/13, 10/31/13, 11/02/13, 11/03/13TFMDPennsylvania
Associated Wholesalers Inc.Diced Summer Slaw Kit (Sold at Deli Counter)10/24/13, 10/26/13, 10/27/13, 10/31/13, 11/02/13, 11/03/13TFMDPennsylvania
Big Y FoodsDiced Summer Slaw Kit (Sold at Deli Counter)10/25/13, 10/27/13, 10/28/13, 11/01/13, 11/03/13TFMDMassachusetts
C&S Wholesale Grocers Inc.Broccoli Crunch Salad Kit (Sold at Deli Counter)10/24/13, 10/25/13 10/26/13, 10/27/13, 10/28/13, 11/02/13, 11/03/13TFMDNew York, Massachusetts, Maryland
C&S Wholesale Grocers Inc.Broccoli Cheddar Kit (Sold at Deli Counter)10/25/13, 10/27/13, 11/03/13TFMDNew York, Massachusetts, Maryland
C&S Wholesale Grocers Inc.Cole Slaw Kit (Sold at Deli Counter)10/24/13, 10/26/13, 10/28/13, 10/31/13, 11/02/13TFMDNew York, Massachusetts, Maryland
C&S Wholesale Grocers Inc.Diced Summer Slaw Kit (Sold at Deli Counter)10/24/13, 10/25/13, 10/26/13, 10/27/13, 10/28/13, 10/31/13, 11/01/13, 11/02/13, 11/03/13TFMDNew York, Massachusetts, Maryland
Crescent Packing Corp.Broccoli Crunch Salad Kit (Sold at Deli Counter)10/28/2013TFMDNew York
DPI Mid Atlantic Inc.Broccoli Crunch Salad Kit (Sold at Deli Counter)10/25/13, 11/01/13TFMDMaryland
DPI Mid Atlantic Inc.Diced Summer Slaw Kit (Sold at Deli Counter)10/25/13, 10/26/13, 10/28/13, 11/01/13, 11/02/13TFMDMaryland
Market BasketBroccoli Crunch Salad Kit (Sold at Deli Counter)10/26/13, 10/28/13, 11/02/13TFMDMassachusetts
Market BasketDiced Summer Slaw Kit (Sold at Deli Counter)10/26/13, 10/28/13, 11/02/13TFMDMassachusetts
Mars Super Markets Inc.Broccoli Crunch Salad Kit (Sold at Deli Counter)10/25/13, 11/01/13TFMDMaryland
Mars Super Markets Inc.Diced Summer Slaw Kit (Sold at Deli Counter)10/25/01, 11/01/13TFMDMaryland
Price Chopper / Golub CorporationBroccoli Crunch Salad Kit (Sold at Deli Counter)10/24/13, 10/26/13, 10/31/13, 11/02/13TFMDNew York
Price Chopper / Golub CorporationDiced Summer Slaw Kit (Sold at Deli Counter)10/24/13, 10/26/13, 10/28/13, 10/31/13, 11/02/13TFMDNew York
Redner's MarketBroccoli Crunch Salad Kit (Sold at Deli Counter)10/26/13, 11/02/13TFMDPennsylvania
RLB Food DistributorsCole Slaw Kit (Sold at Deli Counter)10/25/13, 10/27/13, 10/28/13, 11/01/13, 11/03/13TFMDNew Jersey
RLB Food DistributorsDiced Summer Slaw Kit (Sold at Deli Counter)10/25/13, 11/01/13TFMDNew Jersey
RLB Food DistributorsKings Summer Slaw Kit (Sold at Deli Counter)10/27/13, 10/28/13, 11/03/13TFMDNew Jersey
Shaw'sBroccoli Crunch Salad Kit (Sold at Deli Counter)10/25/13, 10/27/13, 10/28/13, 11/01/13, 11/03/13TFMDMassachusetts
Shaw'sCole Slaw Kit (Sold at Deli Counter)10/25/13, 10/27/13, 10/28/13, 11/01/13, 11/03/13TFMDMassachusetts
Shaw'sDiced Summer Slaw Kit (Sold at Deli Counter)10/25/13, 10/27/13, 10/28/13, 11/01/13, 11/03/13TFMDMassachusetts
Supervalu Inc.Broccoli Crunch Salad Kit (Sold at Deli Counter)10/25/13, 10/27/13, 10/28/13, 11/01/13, 11/03/13TFMDVirginia, Pennsylvania
Supervalu Inc.Cole Slaw Kit (Sold at Deli Counter)10/27/13, 11/01/13, 11/03/13TFMDVirginia, Pennsylvania
Supervalu Inc.Diced Summer Slaw Kit (Sold at Deli Counter)10/25/13, 10/27/13, 10/28/13, 11/01/13, 11/03/13TFMDVirginia, Pennsylvania
C&S Upper MarlboroG&G Italian Pasta SGCAF (Sold at Deli Counter)10/25/13, 10/26/13, 10/27/13, 10/28/13, 11/01/13, 11/02/13, 11/03/13TFMDMaryland
Trucchi's SupermarketsBroccoli Cheddar Kit (Sold at Deli Counter)10/25/13, 11/01/13TFMDMassachusetts
Trucchi's SupermarketsBroccoli Crunch Salad Kit (Sold at Deli Counter)10/25/13, 11/01/13TFMDMassachusetts
Trucchi's SupermarketsDiced Summer Slaw Kit (Sold at Deli Counter)10/25/13, 11/01/13TFMDMassachusetts
Wakefern Food CorporationBroccoli Crunch Salad Kit (Sold at Deli Counter)10/25/13, 10/27/13, 10/28/13, 11/01/13, 11/03/13TFMDNew Jersey
Wakefern Food CorporationBroccoli Cheddar Kit (Sold at Deli Counter)10/25/13, 10/27/13, 10/28/13, 11/01/13, 11/03/13TFMDNew Jersey
Wakefern Food CorporationCole Slaw Kit (Sold at Deli Counter)10/25/13, 10/27/13, 10/28/13, 11/01/13, 11/03/13TFMDNew Jersey
Wakefern Food CorporationDiced Summer Slaw Kit (Sold at Deli Counter)10/25/13, 10/27/13, 10/28/13, 11/01/13, 11/03/13TFMDNew Jersey
Weis Markets Inc.Broccoli Cheddar Kit (Sold at Deli Counter)10/24/13, 10/26/13, 10/27/13, 10/28/13, 10/31/13, 11/02/13TFMDPennsylvania
Randalls / Tom ThumbCabbage Coleslaw Kit with Dressing (Sold at Deli Counter)10/24/13, 10/27/13, 10/29/13, 10/31/13, 11/03/13TFTXTexas
Randalls / Tom ThumbBroccoli Crunch Salad Kit (Sold at Deli Counter)10/25/13, 10/27/13, 10/29/13TFTXTexas
Randalls / Tom ThumbItalian Pasta Salad Kit (Sold at Deli Counter)10/25/13, 10/27/13, 1029/13, 11/01/13TFTXTexas
Priceless FoodsBroccoli Crunch Salad Kit (Sold at Deli Counter)10/24/13, 10/25/13, 10/28/13, 11/07/13TFTNTennessee, Georgia, Kentucky, Indiana
Cooke's Food StoreBroccoli Crunch Salad Kit (Sold at Deli Counter)10/24/13, 10/25/13, 10/28/13, 11/07/13TFTNTennessee, Georgia, Kentucky, Indiana
Food WorldBroccoli Crunch Salad Kit (Sold at Deli Counter)10/24/13, 10/25/13, 10/28/13, 11/07/13TFTNTennessee, Georgia, Kentucky, Indiana
BILOSpinach Antipasti Salad Kit (Sold at Deli Counter)10/29/2013TFTN 
Winn DixieBroccoli Crunch Salad Kit (Sold at Deli Counter)10/23/13, 10/24/13, 10/27/13, 10/29/13, 11/05/13, 11/06/13TFTNFlorida, Georgia, Alabama, Louisiana, Mississippi
Winn DixieSpinach Antipasti Salad Kit (Sold at Deli Counter)10/23/13, 10/24/13, 10/27/13, 10/29/13, 10/30/13, 10/31/13, 11/03/13, 11/05/13, 11/06/13TFTNFlorida, Georgia, Alabama, Louisiana, Mississippi
Houchen's MarketBroccoli Crunch Salad Kit (Sold at Deli Counter)10/24/13, 10/25/13, 11/07/13TFTNKentucky
MeijerBroccoli Crunch Salad Kit (Sold at Deli Counter)10/23/13 ,10/24/13, 10/25/13, 10/28/13, 10/30/13, 11/06/13, 11/07/13TFTNIllinois, Indiana, Michigan, Ohio, Kentucky
MeijerSpinach Antipasti Salad Kit (Sold at Deli Counter)10/23/13, 10/24/13, 10/27/13, 10/29/13, 10/30/13, 10/31/13, 11/03/13, 11/05/13, 11/06/13TFTNIllinois, Indiana, Michigan, Ohio, Kentucky
Performance Food GroupBroccoli Crunch Salad Kit (Foodservice Kit)10/27/13, 10/29/13, 11/05/13TFTNKentucky, Tennessee, Alabama
Performance Food GroupSpinach Antipasti Salad Kit (Foodservice Kit)10/27/13, 10/29/13, 11/05/12TFTNKentucky, Tennessee, Alabama
Performance Food GroupGiardiniera Vegetable Salad Kit (Foodservice Kit)10/27/2013TFTNKentucky, Tennessee, Alabama
Piggly Wiggly Carolina CoBroccoli Crunch Salad Kit (Sold at Deli Counter)10/23/13, 10/25/13, 10/28/13TFTNSouth Carolina, Georgia
SchnuckSpinach Antipasti Salad Kit (Sold at Deli Counter)10/23/13, 10/27/13, 10/30/13, 10/31/13, 11/03/13, 11/06/13TFTNMissouri, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Wisconsin, Iowa
SyscoBroccoli Crunch Salad Kit (Foodservice Kit)10/28/13, 11/02/13TFTNGeorgia, Alabama, Florida, Tennessee, North Carolina, South Carolina, Mississippi, Arkansas, Kentucky, Virginia, Indiana, West Virginia
SyscoBroccoli Slaw Kit (Foodservice Kit)10/23/13, 10/26/13, 10/27/13, 10/28/13, 11/04/13, 11/05/13TFTNGeorgia, Alabama, Florida, Tennessee, North Carolina, South Carolina, Mississippi, Arkansas, Kentucky, Virginia, Indiana, West Virginia
US FoodserviceBroccoli Slaw Kit (Foodservice Kit)10/26/13, 11/05/13TFTNNorth Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Ohio, Kentucky, Indiana

The grocers involved have been instructed to remove any remaining product from their deli case and to dispose of any of the remaining product in their inventory. No other products or code dates are affected by this recall. Customers who have purchased these products are urged not to consume the products and should dispose of the recalled products immediately. Consumers may call for further information at 1-866-508-7048 between the hours of 9 am (PST) and 5 pm (PST) -Monday through Friday. Consumers with concerns about an illness from consumption of this product should contact a health care provider.

 

Taylor Farms Recalls More Broccoli Salad Kits

Taylor Farms Maryland, Inc. in Jessup, Md. and Taylor Farms Texas Inc. in Dallas are recalling approximately 22,849 pounds of broccoli salad kit products due to concerns about possible Listeria monocytogenes contamination in the salad dressing, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced today. The salad dressing in the packets is the subject of a Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recall
The salad kits were shipped to distributors and retail locations for consumer purchase in Maryland, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Texas and Virginia. The company is recalling these products in addition to the 5,084 pounds of similar products that were recalled on Oct. 25, 2013.
The products listed below are being recalled as part of this expansion:
  • 6.06-lb. boxes labeled “TAYLOR FARMS BROCCOLI CRUNCH WITH BACON AND DRESSING” with the case code 310151, produced on Oct. 14 through Oct. 24, 2013.
  • 12.13-lb. boxes labeled “TAYLOR FARMS BROCCOLI CRUNCH WITH BACON AND DRESSING” with the case code 310153, produced Oct. 14 through Oct. 24, 2013.
  • 6.33-lb boxes labeled “Kit, Broc PPC” with case code 5900067, produced Oct. 15 through Oct. 20, 2013.
The products listed below were announced as part of the recall on
Oct. 25, 2013:
  • 6.06-lb. boxes labeled “TAYLOR FARMS BROCCOLI CRUNCH WITH BACON AND DRESSING” with the case code 310151, produced on Oct. 21 and Oct. 22, 2013.
  • 12.13-lb. boxes labeled “TAYLOR FARMS BROCCOLI CRUNCH WITH BACON AND DRESSING” with the case code 310153, produced Oct. 21 through Oct. 23, 2013.
Case labels bear the establishment number “EST. 34522” or “EST. 34733” inside the USDA mark of inspection. Retail consumers and the general public will not typically see the boxes and labels, because the product is typically unboxed by retailers (such as deli counters and restaurants) and the kit used to make salads for retail sale.  The boxes and labels would be more likely to be seen by distributors and retailers.
Taylor Farms informed FSIS that salad dressing subject to an FDA recall was contained in the salad kits produced on the dates listed above.  FSIS, FDA and the company have received no reports of illnesses associated with consumption of these products.  Anyone concerned about an illness should contact a healthcare provider.
Consumption of food contaminated with L. monocytogenes can cause listeriosis, a serious infection that primarily affects older adults, persons with weakened immune systems, and pregnant women and their newborns. Less commonly, persons outside these risk groups are affected.
Listeriosis can cause fever, muscle aches, headache, stiff neck, confusion, loss of balance and convulsions sometimes preceded by diarrhea or other gastrointestinal symptoms. An invasive infection spreads beyond the gastrointestinal tract. In pregnant women, the infection can cause miscarriages, stillbirths, premature delivery or life-threatening infection of the newborn. In addition, serious and sometimes fatal infections in older adults and persons with weakened immune systems. Listeriosis is treated with antibiotics. Persons in the higher-risk categories who experience flu-like symptoms within two months after eating contaminated food should seek medical care and tell the health care provider about eating the contaminated food.
Consumers with questions regarding the recall should contact Taylor Farms Customer Services at 866-508-7048 between the hours of 9-5 Pacific Time.

Lucky 13' Tips for a Safe Halloween


Whether you’re goblin or ghoul, vampire or witch, poor costume choices—including decorative contact lenses and flammable costumes—and face paint allergies can haunt you long after Halloween if they cause injury.
Enjoy a safe and happy Halloween by following the “lucky 13” guidelines from FDA, the Consumer Product Safety Commission, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention:
  1. Wear costumes made of fire-retardant materials; look for “flame resistant” on the label. If you make your costume, use flame-resistant fabrics such as polyester or nylon.
  2. Wear bright, reflective costumes or add strips of reflective tape so you’ll be more visible; make sure the costumes aren’t so long that you’re in danger of tripping.
  3. Wear makeup and hats rather than masks that can obscure your vision.
  4. Test the makeup you plan to use by putting a small amount on the arm of the person who will be wearing it a couple of days in advance. If a rash, redness, swelling, or other signs of irritation develop where the makeup was applied, that's a sign of a possible allergy.
  5. Check FDA’s list of color additives to see if makeup additives are FDA approved. If they aren’t approved for their intended use, don’t use it.
  6. Don’t wear decorative contact lenses unless you have seen an eye care professional and gotten a proper lens fitting and instructions for using the lenses.
Safe Treats
Eating sweet treats is also a big part of the fun on Halloween. If you’re trick-or-treating, health and safety experts say you should remember these tips:
  1. Don’t eat candy until it has been inspected at home.
  2. Trick-or-treaters should eat a snack before heading out, so they won’t be tempted to nibble on treats that haven’t been inspected.
  3. Tell children not to accept—or eat—anything that isn’t commercially wrapped.
  4. Parents of very young children should remove any choking hazards such as gum, peanuts, hard candies, or small toys.
  5. Inspect commercially wrapped treats for signs of tampering, such as an unusual appearance or discoloration, tiny pinholes, or tears in wrappers. Throw away anything that looks suspicious.
For partygoers and party throwers, FDA recommends the following tips for two seasonal favorites:
  1. Look for the warning label to avoid juice that hasn’t been pasteurized or otherwise processed, especially packaged juice products that may have been made on site. When in doubt, ask! Always ask if you are unsure if a juice product is pasteurized or not. Normally, the juice found in your grocer’s frozen food case, refrigerated section, or on the shelf in boxes, bottles, or cans is pasteurized.
  2. Before bobbing for apples—a favorite Halloween game—reduce the amount of bacteria that might be on apples by thoroughly rinsing them under cool running water. As an added precaution, use a produce brush to remove surface dirt.
Eye Safety
FDA joins eye care professionals—including the American Academy of Ophthalmology, the American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus, the Contact Lens Association of Ophthalmologists and the American Optometric Association—in discouraging consumers from using decorative contact lenses.
These experts warn that buying any kind of contact lenses without an examination and a prescription from an eye care professional can cause serious eye disorders and infections, which may lead to permanent vision loss. Despite the fact that it’s illegal to sell decorative contact lenses without a valid prescription, FDA says the lenses are sold on the Internet and in retail shops and salons—particularly around Halloween.
The decorative lenses make the wearer’s eyes appear to glow in the dark, create the illusion of vertical “cat eyes,” or change the wearer’s eye color.
"Although unauthorized use of decorative contact lenses is a concern year-round, Halloween is the time when people may be inclined to use them, perhaps as costume accessories," says FDA eye expert Bernard Lepri, O.D., M.S., M.Ed.. "What troubles us is when they are bought and used without a valid prescription, without the involvement of a qualified eye care professional, or without appropriate follow-up care. This can lead to significant risks of eye injuries, including blindness."

Australia—Pall Mall and Dunhill Cigarettes Recalled



Certain variants and packs of Pall Mall and Dunhill cigarettes featuring the "Smoking Causes Heart Disease" Graphic Health Warning have been recalled.
The following Cigerettes are included in the recall.
Pall Mall Smooth Amber 40s - EAN 9310797271653.
Dunhill 2x25 Distinct Blue (twin pack carton, not individual packets) - EAN 9310797265829.
Dunhill 2x25 Infinite White (twin pack carton, not individual packets) - EAN 9310797267458.
Dunhill 2x25 Premier Red (twin pack carton, not individual packets) - EAN 9310797267434.
Dunhill 2x25 Refined Grey (twin pack carton, not individual packets) - EAN 9310797267441.
Pall Mall Slims 23/138 Fine Silver (cartons, not individual packets) - EAN 9310797277983.
Pall Mall Slims 23/138 Menthol Green (cartons, not individual packets) - EAN 9310797278027.
Pall Mall Slims 23/138 Smooth Amber (cartons, not individual packets) - EAN 9310797277969.
Pall Mall Slims 23/138 Rich Blue (cartons, not individual packets) - EAN 9310797277945.
Dunhill Fine Cut 20/200 Navy (cartons, and individual packets) - EAN 9310797256223.
Dunhill Fine Cut 20/200 White (cartons, and individual packets) - EAN 9310797256506.
What are the defects?
One of the seven Set B Graphic Health Warnings (the "Smoking Causes Heart Disease" GHW), features the previously mandated image, not the current one, which was replaced by the Competition and Consumer (Tobacco) Amendment Information Standard 2012.
The required Graphic Health Warnings have been specifically developed to assist in preventing deaths and illness attributable to tobacco products by preventing uptake or relapse and encouraging cessation of tobacco use.
These cigarettes were sold nationally by various tobacco retailers. They were supplied by British American Tobacco Australia
Consumers can return the product to the place of purchase for a full refund or a replacement product.