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Tuesday, March 31, 2015

Repurposed experimental cancer drug restores brain function in mouse models of Alzheimer’s disease

Scientists have found that a compound originally developed as a cancer therapy potentially could be used to treat Alzheimer’s disease. The team demonstrated that the drug, saracatinib, restores memory loss and reverses brain problems in mouse models of Alzheimer’s, and now the researchers are testing saracatinib’s effectiveness in humans. The study was funded by the National Institutes of Health as part of an innovative crowdsourcing initiative to repurpose experimental drugs.
Alzheimer’s disease is the most common form of dementia, a group of disorders that cause progressive loss of memory and other mental processes. An estimated 5 million Americans have Alzheimer’s disease, which causes clumps of amyloid beta protein to build up in the brain, and these protein clusters damage and ultimately kill brain cells (neurons). Alzheimer’s disease also leads to loss of synapses, which are the spaces between neurons through which the cells talk to each other and form memories. Current Alzheimer’s drug therapies can only ease symptoms without stopping disease progression. New treatments are needed that can halt the condition by targeting its underlying mechanisms.
Image of mouse brain in Alzheimer’s model
In a mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease, amyloid beta clusters (red) build up among neurons (green) in a memory-related area of the brain. (Strittmatter Laboratory, Yale University Photo/Adam Kaufman)
Through NCATS’ New Therapeutic Uses program, Yale neurobiology researcher, neurologist and senior author of the study Stephen Strittmatter, M.D., Ph.D., and his colleagues obtained saracatinib (AZD0530), which the pharmaceutical company AstraZeneca previously developed to treat cancer. Strittmatter and his team knew from previous studies that a protein called Fyn kinase plays a central role in how amyloid beta clusters damage brain cells. Saracatinib targets the same Fyn protein and already had cleared several key steps in the development process, giving Strittmatter team a critical head start on the research.
“The investigational drug already had been developed, optimized and studied in animals as well as tested for safety in humans, so our ability to obtain this asset through NCATS and AstraZeneca gave us an incredible shortcut in the drug development process,” Strittmatter explained.
Typically, drug development can take at least a decade from the discovery of a therapeutic target to an experimental compound’s entry into a Phase 2a human clinical trial to test effectiveness. In the case of saracatinib, the research team completed required preclinical and clinical safety studies and began a Phase 2a trial within about 18 months.
“This work demonstrates what can happen when NIH, the biopharmaceutical industry and academia innovate and collaborate to share resources and knowledge,” said NCATS Director Christopher P. Austin, M.D. “The speed with which this compound moved to human trials validates our New Therapeutic Uses program model and serves NCATS’ mission to deliver more treatments to more patients more quickly.”
“No one individual or group has complete knowledge of disease pathways and treatment targets,” said Craig D. Wegner, Ph.D., head, Boston Emerging Innovations Unit, Scientific Partnering & Alliances within AstraZeneca’s Innovative Medicines and Early Development Biotech Unit. “This program enabled us to pair AstraZeneca’s data on this compound with the Strittmatter group’s specialized Alzheimer’s disease knowledge to uncover a potential new therapeutic use for saracatinib. It’s a great example of how scientists from industry and academia can synergistically work together to push the boundaries of medical science.”
In the animal study, the Yale team gave the experimental drug to mice with Alzheimer’s-like symptoms, such as memory loss and age-related buildup of abnormal amyloid beta clusters, modeling the development of the disease in humans. After four weeks, the Alzheimer’s mice showed complete reversal of spatial learning and memory loss. When the scientists examined the brains of the mice, they found that the characteristic synapse loss had been fully restored, providing a biological explanation for the memory improvement. The treatment also reduced several other Alzheimer’s-related biochemical changes in the mice and did not appear to be toxic.
Already, the Yale scientists have completed a successful Phase 1b safety trial in humans with Alzheimer’s disease (NCT01864655). Now the team is enrolling more participants in a larger, multisite Phase 2a trial (NCT02167256) to assess safety, tolerability and effectiveness of the experimental compound. A total of 152 participants will receive saracatinib or placebo for one year, and the researchers expect to have final results within two years. Individuals interested in participating in the trial can find more information at https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02167256?term=Alzheimer+AND+Fyn&rank=2.

Health Research: Oral hepatitis B vaccine could become a reality ♦ New way to evaluate meniscus tears ♦ Sensor can report conditions from deep in the body

New way to evaluate meniscus tears An individual’s meniscus (cushion in the knee providing stability, load bearing and preservation of the knee joint. It is also one of the most easily injured and difficult to heal. Researchers utilized MRI data to determine the potential for biologic healing following a meniscus tear.
Sensor can report conditions from deep in the body Scientists have devised and demonstrated a new, shape-shifting probe, about 100th as wide as a human hair, which is capable of sensitive, high-resolution remote biological sensing that is not possible with current technology. The design could have a major impact on research in medicine, chemistry, biology and engineering.
New genetic link found for alcohol-related liver cirrhosis In most people, any liver damage that might occur from drinking alcohol is reversible. However, in 25 to 30 percent of alcoholics what begins as accumulation of fat in the liver progresses to inflammation, fibrosis and ultimately irreversible cirrhosis, for which the only treatment is a liver transplant..
New compounds could offer therapy for multitude of diseases An international team has demonstrated that the compounds they developed can safely prevent harmful protein aggregation in preliminary tests using animals. The findings raise hope that a new class of drugs may be on the horizon for the over 30 diseases that involve protein aggregation, including diabetes, cancer, spinal cord injury, Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis
Oral hepatitis B vaccine could become a reality In a new study, researchers report progress toward perfecting a radical new method of producing vaccines using genetically modified corn. The approach could lead to an oral hepatitis B vaccine that requires no refrigeration and costs less than $1 per dose to manufacture.

Pregnancy Research: Pacemaker designed for fetal use ♦ Mother's diet influences weight-control neural circuits in offspring ♦ Effects of smoking seen in unborn babies

First fully-implantable micro pacemaker designed for fetal use The first fully implantable micro pacemaker designed for use in a fetus with complete heart block has been designed by researchers. The investigators anticipate the first human use of the device in the near future.
Mother's diet influences weight-control neural circuits in offspring Maternal diet during pregnancy and lactation may prime offspring for weight gain and obesity later in life, according to researchers who looked at rats whose mothers consumed a high-fat diet and found that the offspring's feeding controls and feelings of fullness did not function normally.
High-definition scans suggest effects of smoking seen in unborn babies The harmful effects of smoking during pregnancy may be reflected in the facial movements of mothers' unborn babies, new research has suggested. The researchers say that the reason for this might be that the fetal central nervous system, did not develop at the same rate and in the same manner as in fetuses of mothers who did not smoke during pregnancy
Research on medical abortion, miscarriage may change international routines Two scientific studies are expected to form the basis of new international recommendations for the treatment of medical abortions and miscarriages. One of the studies shows that it is possible to replace the clinical follow-up examinations recommended today with medical abortions that include a home pregnancy test. The other study shows that midwives can safely and effectively treat failed abortions and miscarriages in rural districts of Uganda.

Seniors Health: Hip fracture patients in long-term care ♦ Music to the ears of dementia suffers:♦ Clues to aging from long-lived lemurs + more

Music to the ears of dementia suffers: learning to play saxophone after diagnosis  Researchers have revealed details of an usual case that offers new insights into frontotemporal dementia (FTD). The story revolves around a patient who, with no prior musical training, learned to play the saxophone after being diagnosed with a behavioural variant of FTD.
Hip fracture patients in long-term care are less likely to receive osteoporosis therapy Canadian researchers calculated the proportion of high-risk residents of long-term care homes receiving osteoporosis medications and vitamin D supplementation according to specific high-risk categories. Marked undertreatment was found, especially in hip-fracture patients.
Clues to aging from long-lived lemurs Researchers combed through more than 50 years of medical records on hundreds of lemurs for clues to their longevity. They found that how long these primates live and how fast they age correlates with the amount of time they spend in a state of suspended animation known as torpor. The research may eventually help scientists identify 'anti-aging' genes in humans.
Eating green leafy vegetables keeps mental abilities sharp Something as easy as adding more spinach, kale, collards and mustard greens to your diet could help slow cognitive decline, according to new research. The study also examined the nutrients responsible for the effect, linking vitamin K consumption to slower cognitive decline for the first time.
Alzheimer's: The killer protein, properly explained Researchers hope to be able, one day, to fight the pathogenic action of the amyloid-beta protein, whose buildup is associated with Alzheimer's disease. In the meantime, scientists have synthesized the knowledge acquired about this protein over the last few decades in a review paper that is destined to become a milestone for future research.

Weight Loss Research:Anti-obesity treatment ♦ Highly Processed Foods Dominate U.S. ♦ Compulsive binge eating with hypertension identified ♦ High-intensity exercise before a fatty meal best for vascular health



Anti-obesity treatment in animal models developed A study has been conducted on obese mice and monkeys, using a drug which inhibits the activity of the PI3K enzyme. The body weight loss observed by researchers was exclusively due to a reduction in fat mass, and no toxic effects have been noted. The study also found an improvement in the symptoms of diabetes and hepatic steatosis (fatty liver disease),
Highly Processed Foods Dominate U.S. Grocery Purchases A nation-wide analysis of U.S. grocery purchases reveals that highly processed foods make up more than 60 percent of the calories in food we buy, and these items tend to have more fat, sugar and salt than less processed foods
Mechanisms that link compulsive binge eating with hypertension identified An estimated eight million adults in the U.S. suffer from binge eating disorder. Now, researchers have shown that compulsive binging on foods that are high in fat and sugar can trigger specific molecular changes that can lead to high blood pressure. While others have studied the effects of binge eating on the brain, this study is the first to look at its molecular effects
Short bouts of high-intensity exercise before a fatty meal best for vascular health A short burst of intensive exercise before eating a high fat meal is better for blood vessel function in young people than the currently recommended moderate-intensity exercise, according to a new study. Cardiovascular diseases including heart attacks and stroke a leading cause of death, and the process underlying these diseases start in youth. An impairment in the function of blood vessels is thought to be the earliest event in this process, and this is known to occur in the hours after consuming a high fat meal.

Childhood Health: Unexplained childhood paralysis ♦ Prebiotic shows promise in regulating kids' appetites ♦ Shoulder and Elbow Injury in Youth Players + more

Scientists link unexplained childhood paralysis to enterovirus D68 Scientists have found the genetic signature of enterovirus D68 in half of the California and Colorado children diagnosed with acute flaccid myelitis -- sudden, unexplained muscle weakness and paralysis -- between 2012 and 2014
Shoulder and Elbow Injury Possibility in Youth Players  Pitching speed, player’s height, and pitching for multiple teams may correlate with a history of shoulder and elbow injuries, according to new research.
Young athletes at greater risk for re-injury after ACL surgery  One in three young athletes who undergo ACL surgery experiences re-injury, according to new research. The study examined the long term success of surgery for patients aged 18 years and younger.
Prebiotic shows promise in regulating kids' appetites  The obesity epidemic among children has caused alarm throughout the United States and Canada. Achieving healthy energy intake among this age group is a widespread health concern. A new method of appetite regulation in children was recently investigated.
Classroom behaviour and dyslexia research  The significance of copying and note-taking in the classroom has been studied by researchers including a view on how it affects the learning of Dyslexic children. "Classroom learning is the bedrock of school education, which relies heavily on copying and note-taking. Copying from a board presents serious difficulties to learners with dyslexia," said the main study's author.

Cancer Research: Less-toxic cancer drug may work as well as chemotherapy ♦ To stop cancer: Block its messages ♦ Cancer-targeting mechanism under development

Panel predicts whether rare leukemia will respond to treatment Patients with chronic myelomonocytic leukemia have limited treatment options, and those that exist are effective only in fewer than half of patients. Now, a new study identifies a panel of genetic markers that predicted which tumor samples would likely respond to treatment
Cancer-targeting mechanism under development Researchers are developing molecules that bind to more than 60 types of cancer. Several are being tested in early-stage clinical trials, including one for brain cancer. These custom-made molecules can carry either a "flag" that shines brightly in standard medical scanners or a bit of radiation to kill the targeted cancer cells.
Fasting and less-toxic cancer drug may work as well as chemotherapy Fasting in combination with chemotherapy has already been shown to kill cancer cells, but a pair of new studies in mice suggests that a less-toxic class of drugs combined with fasting may kill breast, colorectal and lung cancer cells equally wel
To stop cancer: Block its messages A potential drug molecule has been discovered that stops cancer cells, but not healthy ones, from getting their 'mail.' The average living cell needs communication skills: It must transmit a constant stream of messages quickly and efficiently from its outer walls to the inner nucleus, where most of the day-to-day decisions are made. But this rapid, long-distance communication system leaves itself open to mutations that can give rise to a "spam attack" that promotes cancer, the researchers say.

Health News: Seafood company ordered to cease operations ♦ Raw milk benefits don't outweigh health risks ♦ Why popular antacids may increase bone fractures

Seafood company ordered to cease operations A seafood importing and processing company in Los Angeles, CA, has been ordered to cease operations until it can institute safe manufacturing practices. The permanent injunction was announced Monday After a recall of “improperly eviscerated”...
Report to MD government: raw milk benefits don't outweigh health risks Drinking raw milk has an increased risk of foodborne illness, according to a report prepared for the Maryland General Assembly. Last year, the House of Delegates’ Health and Operations Committee was considering a bill to legalize the on-farm sale of unpasteurized milk
Wearable device helps vision-impaired avoid collision An obstacle course was used by researchers to evaluate a wearable collision warning device they developed for patients with peripheral vision loss. They found the device may help patients with a wide range of vision loss avoid colliserationsions with high-level obstacles.
To survive,parasites mixes and matches its disguises Researchers found an unexpected diversity of protein coats within populations of Trypanosoma brucei, challenging the conventional understanding of the dynamics that allow the parasite to persist. Orchestrated costume changes make it possible for certain nasty microbes to outsmart the immune system,
Why popular antacids may increase chance of bone fractures Newly research details a discovery explaining why the 100 million Americans estimated to be taking prescription and over-the-counter antacid and heartburn medications may be at an increased risk of bone fractures.

Monday, March 30, 2015

Boosting Immunotherapy Against Brain Cancer

Cancer immunotherapies harness the potential of the immune system to seek and destroy cancers. They first came into use in the 1990s, and the field is now quickly advancing. One innovative approach being developed is to use dendritic cells. These are a type of immune cell that captures microorganisms and processes their proteins to present to other immune cells and prompt a response.
Dendritic cell.
An artist’s representation of the surface of a human dendritic cell. Image courtesy of NCI.
Dendritic cells have recently been used for immunotherapy to target a variety of tumor types. Dendritic cells are isolated from the patient’s blood, engineered to express antigens from the tumor, and then injected back into the patient as a vaccine. Once in the patient, the engineered dendritic cells migrate to the lymph node and activate T cells to fight the tumor and create an immune memory to prevent the cancer from coming back.
Researchers led by Drs. Duane A. Mitchell and John H. Sampson at Duke University Medical Center tested whether a strategy to increase dendritic cell migration to lymph nodes would improve the effects of a dendritic cell vaccine against glioblastoma multiforme, the most common form of malignant brain cancer in adults. The vaccine targeted an antigen from cytomegalovirus. The role of this virus in disease progression is unclear, but past studies have found that cytomegalovirus proteins are specifically expressed in glioblastoma tumors but not in normal brain cells.
Twelve patients newly diagnosed with glioblastoma were given standard radiation and chemotherapy, and randomly divided into 2 groups. One group received a tetanus booster shot, designed to set off an inflammatory response at the site of the vaccination and prep the immune system. The other patients were injected with their own unaltered dendritic cells instead of a tetanus shot. All were then treated with the dendritic cell vaccine against the cytomegaloviral antigen. The research was funded in part by NIH’s National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) and National Cancer Institute (NCI).
The results, published on March 19, 2015, in Nature, showed that administering a tetanus booster before the vaccine increased dendritic cell migration to lymph nodes and significantly improved both the time without disease progression and overall survival. Patients who received the tetanus booster lived an average of more than 3 years after diagnosis compared to 1.5 years in those who received dendritic cells alone.
The team used a mouse model to determine how the tetanus booster increased dendritic cell migration to lymph nodes. They found that migration depended on memory T cells specific to the tetanus toxoid. Migration also depended on 2 signaling proteins known to guide cell migration: chemokines CCL3 and CCL21.
“We did not expect that enhancing dendritic cell migration would be associated with such a dramatic improvement on clinical outcomes in our patients,” Mitchell says.
Larger clinical studies will be needed to confirm this approach of boosting immune responses and targeting cytomegalovirus in glioblastomas. Continued research into the mechanisms involved in the response to cancer vaccines—and how best to target cytomegalovirus and other tumor proteins—may also lead to further improvements.

Promoting maternal interaction improves growth, weight gain in preemies

An intervention to teach mothers of preterm infants how to interact with their babies more effectively results in better weight gain and growth for the infants, according to a study funded in part by the National Institutes of Health.
A subsequent study showed that infants who had the benefit of a major component of this intervention more rapidly developed the muscle control needed for feeding successfully from a bottle. The initial findings were published online in the Journal of Perinatology and the subsequent study in Advances in Neonatal Care.
Briefly, the intervention involved teaching mothers to recognize and respond to the subtle cues their preterm infants were hungry — far less pronounced than term infants. Mothers were also taught how to provide appropriate social and physical stimulation — such as soothing talk, and gentle massages — to spur their infants’ neurological development.
Infants born preterm often are not developed enough to feed on their own. Typically, the muscle control needed for infants to feed unassisted does not completely develop until the 34th week of pregnancy. Infants born before this time usually are fed through a nasogastric tube — a line passed through the nose and down the throat into the stomach. The study authors developed the intervention to help mothers stimulate their infant’s alertness before feeding so that the infants would be better able to feed by mouth. The intervention also sought to spur the infants’ social behaviors, such as keeping alert and looking at the mother, and neurological development, in hopes of offsetting at least some of the developmental delays often seen in preterm infants.
“Preterm infants who fail to gain sufficient weight are at a higher risk for delays and even impairments in cognitive ability and motor skills,” said Valerie Maholmes, Ph.D “We are hopeful that this intervention will prove to be an important tool in safeguarding the long-term health of an extremely vulnerable group of infants.”

Health Research: College athletes may have low vitamin D levels ♦ C. difficile doubles hospital readmission rates♦ Mutation explain why flu can kill + more

More than one-third of Division I college athletes may have low vitamin D levels A new study found that more than one-third of elite, Division I college athletes may have low levels of vitamin D, which is critical in helping the body to absorb calcium needed to maintain bone mass, and to minimize injury risk.
C. difficile doubles hospital readmission rates, Patients with Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) are twice as likely to be readmitted to the hospital as patients without the deadly diarrheal infection, according to a new study.
Fracture liaison services prevent fractures and save lives Using a simulation model, researchers have shown that the implementation of Fracture Liaison Services could considerably reduce the human associated with osteoporotic fractures.
What to do with kidneys from older deceased donors? For older patients in need of a kidney transplant, rapid transplantation from an older deceased donor is superior to delayed transplantation from a younger donor. Kidneys from older donors do not have sufficient longevity to provide younger patients with a lifetime of kidney function, but they do have sufficient longevity to provide older patients
Genetic mutation helps explain why, in rare cases, flu can kill A small number of children who catch the influenza virus fall so ill they end up in the hospital even while their family and friends recover easily. New research helps explain why: a rare genetic mutation that prevents the production of a critical protein, interferon, that is needed to fight off the virus.

Health News: Cancer Risk is Cause for EPA to Act on GMO weed Killer + Mysterious sleeping sickness ♦ How Safe Is Food at Great American Ball Park

A Mysterious sleeping sickness   Photo Credit: Shutterstock.com Hundreds of residents of Kalachi, a small town near a former Soviet Union uranium mine in Kazakhstan, have been suffering from a mysterious sleeping sickness that causes them to fall asleep for two to six days and wake up with significant memory loss.
How Safe Is Food at Great American Ball Park When the baseball world converges on Cincinnati this summer for the All-Star Game, fans will flock to a public place that ranked first in the region last year for food safety violations. Great American Ball Park had 224 violations in seven 2014 inspections, including 69 critical violations, which are problems that could be linked to food-related illness. The records
Green Group Calls For Ban on Nanomaterials in  Food and Packaging  Health campaigners have intensified their calls for Australia to regulate the use of nano-sized silver in everyday products, following the United States peak environmental agency's decision to start doing so. Health campaigners have intensified their calls for Australia to regulate the use of nano-sized silver in everyday products
Cancer Risk is Cause for EPA to Act on GMO weed Killer The Environmental Working Group joined a number of other environmental and consumer rights organizations yesterday to ask the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to stop the rollout of Dow AgroSciences’ new weed killer Enlist DuoTM – a combination of glyphosate and 2,4-D. The groups’ action followed an announcement by the International Agency for Cancer Research,

Women's Health Research: Could a tampon one day help predict endometrial cancer? ♦ Ozone air pollution could harm women's fertility ♦ Women with ovarian cancer gain extra months ♦

Could a tampon one day help predict endometrial cancer? It is possible to detect endometrial cancer using tumor DNA picked up by ordinary tampons, researchers say. The new approach specifically examines DNA samples from vaginal secretions for the presence of chemical “off” switches — known as methylation — that can disable genes that normally keep cancer in check.
Immunotherapy delays recurrence for stage III and IV ovarian cancers  Personalized medicine is getting closer to reality for women with late-stage ovarian cancer. An experimental immunotherapy is in the works that can target an individual woman’s tumor and extend the time period between initial treatment and the cancer’s return.
Women with ovarian cancer gain extra months with addition of drug to standard chemotherapy Overall survival for women who received standard chemotherapy treatment plus bevacizumab was a median five months longer than for women who received the standard chemotherapy treatment alone.
Ozone air pollution could harm women's fertility Many urban and suburban areas have high levels of ground-level ozone, an air pollutant that can adversely affect lung and heart health. New research in mice suggests breathing high levels of ozone could also affect women’s ability to conceive.

Cancer Research: Switch that might tame most aggressive of breast cancers ♦ new blood test to detect colorectal cancer ♦ Natural extract shows promise for preventing breast cancer,

So-called 'triple-negative breast cancers' are two distinct diseases that likely originate from different cell types, researchers have found. They have also found a gene that drives the aggressive disease, and hope to find a way to 'switch it off'.
Bio-marker set forms the basis for new blood test to detect colorectal cancer Colorectal cancer is the second most common cause of cancer deaths. The chance of a cure is high if the cancer is detected early. Researchers have identified biomarkers that can be incorporated in a simple blood test. This should make it possible to detect colorectal cancer early.
MRI based on a sugar molecule can tell cancerous from noncancerous cells Imaging tests like mammograms or CT scans can detect tumors, but figuring out whether a growth is or isn't cancer usually requires a biopsy . Now results of a study suggest that MRI could one day make biopsies more effective or replace them altogether by noninvasively detecting telltale sugar molecules shed by the cancerous cells.
Natural extract shows promise for preventing breast cancer, study suggests In a new study, the extract from rose hips — the fruit of the rose plant — significantly reduced the growth and migration of cells from a type of breast cancer known as triple negative. This particularly aggressive form of cancer does not respond to most available treatments and tends to affect young women

Sunday, March 29, 2015

Health Research: Antibacterial plastic: Plastic plus egg whites ♦ Harmless bacteria helpful against meningococcal outbreaks ♦ Painful knee and hand osteoarthritis


Black patients more likely to be readmitted after hip, knee replacement surgery  A new study found that black and Hispanic patients were 62 and 50 percent, respectively, more likely to be readmitted to the hospital within 30 days after total joint replacement surgery
Harmless bacteria may be helpful against meningococcal outbreaks  Nasal drops of harmless bacteria can inhibit a related bug that sometimes causes meningococcal disease, according to new findings. The study -- conducted among college students, a group at higher risk for this often serious illness -- suggests a new approach that could help suppress outbreaks of the disease,
Recycling histones through transcription  Cells reuse a part of the histones which are used to pack DNA, according to research conducted on yeast cells. However, researchers say that it is likely that similar mechanisms are important for human beings as well.
Recipe for antibacterial plastic: Plastic plus egg whites  Bioplastics made from protein sources such as albumin and whey have shown significant antibacterial properties, findings that could eventually lead to their use in plastics used in medical applications such as wound healing dressings, sutures, catheter tubes and drug delivery, according to a recent study.
Is painful knee and hand osteoarthritis in women associated with excess mortality?  Researchers present a study that compares mortality rates of women with painful knee and hand osteoarthritis with the mortality of unaffected women from the same community; demonstrates higher risk of early death in the group with painful knee osteoarthritis.

Health News: Why did Gov’t OK notorious Monsanto pesticide ♦ Critics call White House antibiotic resistance inadequate ♦ Nearly 100 people sickened after banquet


Why did Gov’t give big thumbs up to notorious Monsanto pesticide  The World Health Organization, the U.N.'s public health agency, said on Friday that glyphosate, an herbicide widely used on genetically modified crops such as corn and soybeans, The report presents the findings of 17 biochemists, 

Arrowhead, Kauffman stadiums’ food service fires manager who complained about dirty conditions  A food safety manager at Kauffman and Arrowhead stadiums in Kansas City says he was fired after complaining about dirty conditions.

Critics call White House Antibiotic resistance action plan a missed opportunity The White House released its National Action Plan for Combating Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria on Friday, but some critics say it doesn’t do enough to tackle antibiotic use on farms. Antibiotic resistance causes tens of thousands of deaths and millions of illnesses every year

Nearly 100 people sickened after attending Philadelphia banquet  Dozens of lawyers and law students fell ill after attending a Feb. 27 banquet in Philadelphia, and the incident is now a suspected foodborne illness outbreak, according to the Philadelphia Inquirer. The restaurant, Joy Tsin Lau, a dim-sum hotspot, reportedly has..

Stem cells may improve tendon healing, reduce retear risk in rotator cuff surgery An injection of a patient's bone marrow stem cells during rotator cuff surgery significantly improved healing and tendon durability, according to a new study

Saturday, March 28, 2015

Numerous Brands of Walnuts and Trail Mix recalled

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE — March 27, 2015 — Orange, CT — Aurora Products, Inc. is expanding its voluntary nationwide recall of certain lots of NATURAL WALNUTS and TRAIL MIXES CONTAINING WALNUTS, because they have the potential to contain Salmonella.
Salmonella can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems. Healthy persons infected with Salmonella often experience fever, diarrhea (which may be bloody), nausea, vomiting and abdominal pain. In rare circumstances, infection with Salmonella can result in the organism getting into the bloodstream and producing more severe illnesses such as arterial infections (i.e., infected aneurysms), endocarditis and arthritis.
Product was distributed nationwide through retail stores. Product was also distributed in Canada and Bermuda.
The affected products listed below were produced by Aurora Products, Inc. The potential for contamination was noted after routine testing by an outside company contracted by the FDA revealed the presence of Salmonella in one container of natural walnuts product. Organic walnuts are not affected.
Consumers that have the products listed below are urged to not eat it and destroy the product or return it to the point of purchase. Customers with questions can contact Aurora Products, Inc. for further information at (800)-898-1048 between the hours of 9:00AM to 5:00 PM EST Monday – Friday.
Private Label Products That Use Store Branded Labeling Include: America Choice, Belmont Market, Boiceville Market, Gaul’s Market, Green Hills Market, Harvest Co – Op Market, Hurley Ridge, Lees, Miles Market, Palmers Market, Union Market, Walter Stewart , Windfall Market and Wild Acorns.
America Choice Brand Products
AFFECTED PRODUCT
PACKAGE SIZE
UPC CODE
BEST IF USED BY DATE CODE RANGE
Walnuts
12 oz. Plastic Pouch
75480779049
10/29/15 – 12/7/15
Cranberry Health Mix
12 oz. Plastic Pouch
75480779046
10/30/15 – 12/13/15
Belmont Market Brand Products
AFFECTED PRODUCT
PACKAGE SIZE
UPC CODE
BEST IF USED BY DATE CODE RANGE
Walnuts
6.5 oz. Plastic Cup
65585200097
10/29/15 – 12/7/15
Cranberry Health Mix
9.25 oz. Plastic Cup
65585200288
10/30/15 – 12/13/15
Cranberry Health Mix
21 oz. Plastic Cup
65585200585
10/30/15 – 12/13/15
Roasted Salt Mixed Nuts
20 oz. Plastic Tub
65585200340
11/4/15 – 12/13/15
5 K Omega Trail Mix
10 oz. Plastic Cup
65585200703
11/3/15 – 11/16/15
Boiceville Market Brand Products
AFFECTED PRODUCT
PACKAGE SIZE
UPC CODE
BEST IF USED BY DATE CODE RANGE
Roasted No Salt Mixed Nuts
9.0 oz. Plastic Cup
65585200243
11/10/15 – 12/10/15
Citarella Brand Products
AFFECTED PRODUCT
PACKAGE SIZE
UPC CODE
BEST IF USED BY DATE CODE RANGE
Cranberry Health Mix
9.25 oz. Plastic Cup
79084505949
10/30/15 – 12/19/15
Cranberry Health Mix
Bulk
NO UPC
10/30/15 – 12/13/15
Food Emporium Brand Products
AFFECTED PRODUCT
PACKAGE SIZE
UPC CODE
BEST IF USED BY DATE CODE RANGE
6 – Section Nut Tray Assortment
26 oz. Plastic Tray
01119079012
11/6/15 – 12/10/15
4 – Section Nut Tray Assortment
13 oz. Plastic Tray
01119079011
11/6/15 – 12/10/15
Cranberry Health Mix
7.5 oz. Gift Bag
01119079044
10/30/15 – 12/13/15
Raisin Nut Party Mix
7.5 oz. Gift Bag
01119079050
11/10/15 – 12/10/15
Roasted Salt Mixed Nuts
6.5 oz. Gift Bag
01119079042
11/4/15 – 12/10/15
Roasted Salt Mixed Nuts
20 oz. Plastic Tub
01119079095
11/4/15 – 12/10/15
Roasted No Salt Mixed Nuts
20 oz. Plastic Tub
01119079039
11/10/15 – 12/10/15
Cranberry Health Mix
21 oz. Plastic Cup
01119079010
10/30/15 – 12/19/15
Walnuts
14.0 oz. Plastic Tub
01119079096
10/29/15 – 12/7/15
Walnuts
12.0 oz. Plastic Pouch
72297451004
10/29/15 – 12/7/15
Gaul’s Market Brand Products
AFFECTED PRODUCT
PACKAGE SIZE
UPC CODE
BEST IF USED BY DATE CODE RANGE
Walnuts
6.5 oz. Plastic Cup
65585200097
10/29/15 – 12/7/15
Cranberry Health Mix
9.25 oz. Plastic Cup
65585200288
10/30/15 – 12/13/15
Cranberry Health Mix
21 oz. Plastic Cup
65585200585
10/30/15 – 12/13/15
Raisin Nut Party Mix
11.0 oz. Plastic Cup
65585200094
11/10/15 – 12/10/15
Roasted No Salt Mixed Nuts
9.0 oz. Plastic Cup
65585200243
11/10/15 – 12/10/15
Roasted Salt Mixed Nuts
9.0 oz. Plastic Cup
65585200084
11/4/15 – 12/13/15
Roasted Salt Mixed Nuts
20 oz. Plastic Tub
65585200340
11/4/15 – 12/13/15
Gourmet Garage Brand Products
AFFECTED PRODUCT
PACKAGE SIZE
UPC CODE
BEST IF USED BY DATE CODE RANGE
Walnuts
6.5 oz. Plastic Cup
79084505931
10/29/15 – 12/7/15
Walnuts
14.0 oz. Plastic Tub
79084505371
10/29/15 – 12/7/15
Roasted Mixed Nuts with sea salt
9 oz. Plastic Cup
79084505922
11/4/15 – 12/19/15
Roasted Mixed Nuts No Salt
9 oz. Plastic Cup
79084506010
11/10/15 – 12/19/15
Roasted Salted Mixed Nuts Deluxe
9 oz. Plastic Cup
79084505945
11/18/15 – 12/19/15
Roasted Salt Mixed Nuts with sea salt
20 oz. Plastic Tub
79084505842
11/4/15 – 12/19/15
San Fernando Sunshine Mix
11 oz. Plastic Cup
79084505936
11/10/15 – 12/19/15
5 K Omega Trail Mix
10 oz. Plastic Cup
79084505947
11/3/15 – 12/19/15
Cranberry Health Mix
9.25 oz. Plastic Cup
79084505949
10/30/15 – 12/19/15
Cranberry Health Mix
21 oz. Plastic Cup
79084505603
10/30/15 – 12/19/15
Green Hills Market Brand Products
AFFECTED PRODUCT
PACKAGE SIZE
UPC CODE
BEST IF USED BY DATE CODE RANGE
Cranberry Health Mix
9.25 oz. Plastic Cup
65585200288
10/30/15 – 12/13/15
Cranberry Health Mix
21 oz. Plastic Cup
65585200585
10/30/15 – 12/13/15
Harvest Co – Op Market Brand Products
AFFECTED PRODUCT
PACKAGE SIZE
UPC CODE
BEST IF USED BY DATE CODE RANGE
Walnuts
6.5 oz. Plastic Cup
65585200097
10/29/15 – 12/7/15
Cranberry Health Mix
9.25 oz. Plastic Cup
65585200288
10/30/15 – 12/13/15
Raisin Nut Party Mix
11.0 oz. Plastic Cup
65585200094
11/10/15 – 12/10/15
Roasted No Salt Mixed Nuts
9.0 oz. Plastic Cup
65585200243
11/10/15 – 12/10/15
Roasted Salt Mixed Nuts
9.0 oz. Plastic Cup
65585200084
11/4/15 – 12/13/15
Hurley Ridge Brand Products
AFFECTED PRODUCT
PACKAGE SIZE
UPC CODE
BEST IF USED BY DATE CODE RANGE
Walnuts
6.5 oz. Plastic Cup
65585200097
10/29/15 – 12/7/15
Walnuts
12 oz. Plastic Pouch
65585200316
10/29/15 – 12/7/15
Raisin Nut Party Mix
11.0 oz. Plastic Cup
65585200094
11/10/15 – 12/10/15
Roasted No Salt Mixed Nuts
9.0 oz. Plastic Cup
65585200243
11/10/15 – 12/10/15
Roasted Salt Mixed Nuts
9.0 oz. Plastic Cup
65585200084
11/4/15 – 12/13/15
Cranberry Health Mix
9.25 oz. Plastic Cup
65585200288
10/30/15 – 12/13/15
Cranberry Health Mix
21 oz. Plastic Cup
65585200585
10/30/15 – 12/13/15
Lees Market Brand Products
AFFECTED PRODUCT
PACKAGE SIZE
UPC CODE
BEST IF USED BY DATE CODE RANGE
Walnuts
6.5 oz. Plastic Cup
65585200097
10/29/15 – 12/7/15
Cranberry Health Mix
9.25 oz. Plastic Cup
65585200288
10/30/15 – 12/13/15
Cranberry Health Mix
21 oz. Plastic Cup
65585200585
10/30/15 – 12/13/15
Miles Market Brand Products (Bermuda)
AFFECTED PRODUCT
PACKAGE SIZE
UPC CODE
BEST IF USED BY DATE CODE RANGE
Cranberry Health Mix
9.25 oz. Plastic Cup
65585200288
10/30/15 – 12/13/15
Palmers Market Brand Products
AFFECTED PRODUCT
PACKAGE SIZE
UPC CODE
BEST IF USED BY DATE CODE RANGE
Walnuts
6.5 oz. Plastic Cup
65585200097
10/29/15 – 12/7/15
Roasted Salt Mixed Nuts
9.0 oz. Plastic Cup
65585200084
11/4/15 – 12/13/15
Roasted No Salt Mixed Nuts
9.0 oz. Plastic Cup
65585200243
11/10/15 – 12/10/15
Union Market Brand Products
AFFECTED PRODUCT
PACKAGE SIZE
UPC CODE
BEST IF USED BY DATE CODE RANGE
Walnuts
6.5 oz. Plastic Cup
65585200097
10/29/15 – 12/7/15
Cranberry Health Mix
9.25 oz. Plastic Cup
65585200288
10/30/15 – 12/13/15
5 K Omega Trail Mix
10 oz. Plastic Cup
65585200703
11/3/15 – 11/16/15
Walter Stewart Market Brand Products
AFFECTED PRODUCT
PACKAGE SIZE
UPC CODE
BEST IF USED BY DATE CODE RANGE
Walnuts
14.0 oz. Plastic Tub
65585200070
10/29/15 – 12/7/15
Roasted No Salt Mixed Nuts
9.0 oz. Plastic Cup
65585200243
11/10/15 – 12/10/15
Windfall Market Brand Products
AFFECTED PRODUCT
PACKAGE SIZE
UPC CODE
BEST IF USED BY DATE CODE RANGE
Walnuts
6.5 oz. Plastic Cup
65585200097
10/29/15 – 12/7/15
Cranberry Health Mix
9.25 oz. Plastic Cup
65585200288
10/30/15 – 12/13/15
Wild Acorns Brand Products
AFFECTED PRODUCT
PACKAGE SIZE
UPC CODE
BEST IF USED BY DATE CODE RANGE
Walnuts
6.5 oz. Plastic Cup
81957401075
10/29/15 – 12/7/15
Roasted Salt Mixed Nuts
9.0 oz. Plastic Cup
81957401052
11/4/15 – 12/13/15
Roasted No Salt Mixed Nuts
9.0 oz. Plastic Cup
81957401040
11/10/15 – 12/10/15
Raisin Nut Party Mix
11.0 oz. Plastic Cup
81957401031
11/10/15 – 12/10/15
Cranberry Health Mix
9.25 oz. Plastic Cup
81957401025
10/30/15 – 12/13/15
Cranberry Health Mix
16.0 oz. Plastic Pouch
81957401114
10/30/15 – 12/13/15
Wild By Nature Brand Products
AFFECTED PRODUCT
PACKAGE SIZE
UPC CODE
BEST IF USED BY DATE CODE RANGE
Cranberry Health Mix
9.25 oz. Plastic Cup
65585270288
10/30/15 – 12/13/15
Roasted Salt Mixed Nuts
9.0 oz. Plastic Cup
65585270084
11/4/15 – 12/10/15
Roasted No Salt Mixed Nuts
9.0 oz. Plastic Cup
65585270243
11/10/15 – 12/10/15
Walnuts
6.5 oz. Plastic Cup
65585270097
10/29/15 – 12/7/15