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Sunday, May 31, 2015

Cardiovascular Research: Race influences warfarin dose ♦ All forms of smoking are bad for the heart ♦ Blood pressure medications can lead to increased risk of stroke

Before an operation, low blood pressure rather than high is a risk factor for death New research suggests that, before an operation, low blood pressure rather than high blood pressure is an independent risk factor for death.
Blood pressure medications can lead to increased risk of stroke The importance of preventing hypertension is reinforced by a study showing anti-hypertension medicines can increase stroke risk by 248 percent, according to new research.
Anticoagulant medications: Newer, easier to manage medications may not always be the best choice If you are over age 75, and taking an anticoagulant, the old standard may be the gold standard, Mayo Clinic researchers and collaborators have determined.
Race influences warfarin dose A new report demonstrates that clinical and genetic factors affecting dose requirements for warfarin vary by race. The study proposes race-specific equations to help clinicians better calculate warfarin dosage
All forms of smoking are bad for the heart All forms of smoking are bad for the heart, the European Society of Cardiology has warned.

Cancer Research: Pinpointing natural cancer drug's true origins ♦ Controlling typhoid bacterium key to prevent gallbladder cancer♦ Colorectal cancer genetically different in younger patients

Pinpointing natural cancer drug's true origins For decades, scientists have known that ET-743, a compound extracted from a marine invertebrate called a mangrove tunicate, can kill cancer cells. By analyzing the genome of the tunicate along with the microbes that live inside it using advanced sequencing techniques, researchers have been able to isolate the genetic blueprint of the ET-743's producer--which turns out to be a type of bacteria
State regulations for indoor tanning could lead to a national regulatory framework A national regulatory framework designed to prevent and limit indoor tanning is needed to alleviate the cancer burden and reduce the billions in financial costs from preventable skin cancer.
Controlling typhoid bacterium key to prevent gallbladder cancer in India and Pakistan Controlling typhoid fever could dramatically reduce the risk of gallbladder cancer in India and Pakistan. The findings establish the causal link between the bacterial infection and gallbladder cancer, explaining why this type of cancer is rare in the West but common in India and Pakistan, where typhoid fever is endemic.
Phase 2 trial identifies genetic dysfunction that makes many types of cancer vulnerable to an immunotherapy Researchers have identified a genetic malfunction that predicts the effectiveness of response to a groundbreaking immunotherapy. The results of their Phase 2 clinical trial reveal that, regardless of its tissue of origin, tumors whose cells are deficient in repairing mismatched DNA sequences--and so preventing mutations--are far more susceptible to pembrolizumab than those that retain this ability.
Colorectal cancer genetically different in older and younger patients While the overall rate of colorectal cancer (CRC) is declining, CRC specifically among young patients is increasing. Previous studies have shown that CRC in patients younger than 50 years old tends to be more aggressive than CRC in older patients. A new study offers early evidence of genetic differences between CRC in young and old patients, possibly pointing toward different treatments and strategies in combating the young form of the disease.

Pulmonary Research: Inhaled corticosteroids for COPD decrease mortality risk ♦ Treatment for genetically caused emphysema effective ♦ Doctors' checklist help decrease length of COPD treatment

Inhaled corticosteroids for COPD decrease mortality risk from pneumonia and other causes Treatment of COPD with inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) may decrease the risk of dying from pneumonia and from other causes despite being associated with an increase in the occurrence of pneumonia.
New music strategy shows 70% increase in exercise adherence The use of personalized music playlists with tempo-pace synchronization increases adherence to cardiac rehab by almost 70 per cent.
Treatment for genetically caused emphysema effective A landmark clinical study provides convincing evidence that a frequently overlooked therapy for genetically-caused emphysema is effective and slows the progression of lung disease. Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency is an inherited disorder that can cause emphysema even without exposure to tobacco smoke.
Doctors' checklist could help decrease length of COPD patients' hospital stay Patients with worsening chronic obstructive pulmonary disease spend less time in hospital when their doctors manage their care by using a checklist of steps called order sets.

Health Research: Alcohol combined with cannabis increases levels of THC in blood ♦ Flood aftermath linked to post-traumatic stress ♦ New model for identifying total hip replacement candidates

Any dose of alcohol combined with cannabis significantly increases levels of THC in blood Cannabis plus alcohol is one of the most frequently detected drug combinations in car accidents, yet the interaction of these two compounds is still poorly understood. A study shows that the simultaneous use of alcohol and cannabis produces significantly higher blood concentrations of cannabis's main psychoactive constituent, THC,
Flood aftermath linked to post-traumatic stress Brisbane flood victims suffered more psychological distress during the rebuilding phase than as waters inundated their homes and businesses. While the flood was frightening on the day, the most difficult aspect was the aftermath including clean-up, rebuilding process and dealing with insurance companies.
Are antidepressants more effective than usually assumed? Many have recently questioned the efficacy of the most common antidepressant medications, the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. The conclusion that these drugs are ineffective is however partly based on a misinterpretation of the outcome of the clinical trials once conducted to demonstrate their efficacy.
New model for identifying total hip replacement candidates A new model to help doctors and patients decide whether or not to proceed with total hip replacement surgery has been designed. The researchers have also surveyed patient well being after surgery: patients with high education achieve greater outcome scores, while those with antidepressant prescriptions do not.

Homely men who misbehave can't win for losing: Attractiveness influences online daters, jurors Women tolerate an unattractive man up to a point, but beware if he misbehaves. Then they'll easily shun him, researchers report, after finding that a woman's view of a man is influenced by how handsome and law-abiding he is.

Health News:Campylobacter cases linked to raw milk ♦ Zero tolerance for pesticide in baby food ♦ DNA: Expanding code of life with new 'letters'

Several Campylobacter cases linked to raw milk Campylobacter cases have been reported in several children younger than 2. Some of the cases have been linked to drinking unpasteurized, or raw, milk. Bacteria such as E. coli O157, Campylobacter and Salmonella can contaminate milk  
New Zealand group seeks zero tolerance for pesticide in baby food A petition seeking zero tolerance for pesticide residues in baby food was discussed Friday by a committee of the New Zealand parliament, but members reportedly took no action on it. The Safe Food Campaign, which is sponsoring the petition, noted that the European Commission has mandated no detectable pesticide levels.
America's research funding squeeze imperils patient care Constraints in federal funding, compounded by declining clinical revenue, jeopardize more than America's research enterprise. These twin pressures have created a "hostile working environment" that erodes time to conduct research, "discourages innovative high-risk science" and threatens to drive scientists out of the field. And this in turn undermines patient care.
Hallucinations and delusions more common than thought Scientists have found that hearing voices and seeing things (that others cannot) impacts about 5 percent of the general population during their lives.
DNA: Expanding code of life with new 'letters' The DNA encoding all life on Earth is made of four building blocks called nucleotides, commonly known as 'letters,' that line up in pairs and twist into a double helix. Now, two groups of scientists are reporting for the first time that two new nucleotides can do the same thing -- raising the possibility that entirely new proteins could be created for medical uses.

Saturday, May 30, 2015

Aging Research: Imaging test may identify biomarker of Alzheimer's disease ♦ Changing activity in the aging brain ♦ Tablets can help elderly cross the 'digital divide'

Researchers discover surprisingly wide variation across species in genetic systems that influence aging A new study focusing on insulin signaling uncovered surprising genetic diversity across reptiles, birds and mammals. Scientists previously assumed the process remained much the same throughout the animal kingdom, but the new research shows that the genetic pathways in reptiles evolved to include protein forms not observed in mammals.
Tablets can help elderly cross the 'digital divide' One way to help the elderly cross what's known as the 'digital divide' is the use of tablets, those smaller, lighter, easy-to-use computers that seem to be taking the place of laptops
Imaging test may identify biomarker of Alzheimer's disease Degeneration of the white matter of the brain may be an early marker of specific types of Alzheimer's disease (AD), including early-onset AD.
Changing activity in the aging brain Normal aging affects our ability to carry out complex cognitive tasks. But exactly how our brain functions change during this process is largely unknown. Now, researchers have demonstrated that aging changes the activity patterns in specific brain regions involved in memory and cognition.
Molecules involved in Alzheimer's have a role in weakening of connections between neurons Molecules that are strongly associated with Alzheimer's disease are important players in a process called long-term depression (LTD), researchers have discovered. LTD is a process through which the strength of synapses, the connections between neurons, is selectively reduced. This new research suggests improperly regulated LTD could cause the degeneration of the connections between neurons that is a core feature of Alzheimer's and other neurodegenerative diseases.

Immune Research: What causes immune cell migration to wounds ♦ Viral variants helps hepatitis C survive immune system attacks ♦ Some immune cells change to prolong inflammation

How the immune system controls the human biological clock in times of infection An important link between the human body clock and the immune system has relevance for better understanding inflammatory and infectious diseases. Researchers report how a critical white blood cell called the macrophage, when exposed to bacteria, makes the biological clock inside the macrophage stop, allowing it to become inflamed.
Dental researchers find some immune cells change to prolong inflammation One of the mysteries of how a small group of immune cells work has been unraveled by researchers: some inflammation-fighting immune cells may actually convert into cells that trigger disease.
Cooperation among viral variants helps hepatitis C survive immune system attacks Warring armies use a variety of tactics, including use of a decoy force that occupies the defenders while an unseen force launches a separate attack that the defenders fail to notice. A new study suggests that the Hepatitis C virus may employ similar tactics to distract the body's natural defenses.
Scientists discover key to what causes immune cell migration to wounds Immune cells play an important role in the upkeep and repair of our bodies, helping us to defend against infection and disease. Until now, how these cells detect a wounded or damaged site has largely remained a mystery. New research has identified the triggers which lead these cells to react and respond in cell repair.

Health Research: Engineered probiotics detect tumors in liver ♦ Ending Medicaid dental benefit is costly ♦ Very overweight teens risk bowel cancer

'Decoder ring' powers found in microRNA  MicroRNA can serve as a "decoder ring" for understanding complex biological processes, a team of chemists has found. Their study points to a new method for decrypting the biological functions of enzymes and identifying those that drive diseases.
Very overweight teens may double their risk of bowel cancer in middle age Being very overweight in your teens may double the risk of developing bowel cancer by the time you are middle aged, suggests new research.
African-Americans at lower socioeconomic levels have increased risk of heart disease African-Americans, especially women and young adults at lower socioeconomic levels have an increased risk of heart disease and stroke. The findings underscore the need for increased awareness and education about prevention and early detection and treatment of cardiovascular disease in African-American women and younger adults.
Diagnosing cancer with luminescent bacteria: Engineered probiotics detect tumors in liver Engineers have devised a new way to detect cancer that has spread to the liver, by enlisting help from probiotics -- beneficial bacteria similar to those found in yogurt. Using a harmless strain of E. coli that colonizes the liver, the researchers programmed the bacteria to produce a luminescent signal that can be detected with a simple urine test.

Ending Medicaid dental benefit is costly A study finds states gain little when dropping adult dental coverage. Researchers say adults in California made 1,800 more hospital visits annually for dental care after losing the benefit. California spent $2.9 million each year, 68 percent more before eliminating the benefit.

Health News: FBI investigating Johnson & Johnson ♦ Supermarkets with worst records on contaminated chickens ♦ Nearly indestructible virus yields tool to treat diseases

FBI investigating Johnson & Johnson The FBI is questioning makers of a surgical device that can spread cancer cells in female patients, asking Johnson & Johnson officials what the manufacturing giant knew about the tool before yanking it out of service in 2014. The FBI's Newark
Supermarkets with worst records on contaminated chickens THE CONTAMINATION of nearly three-quarters of supermarket chickens with a potentially deadly bug is now the biggest food safety concern in the UK, the Food Standards Agency said. The watchdog said it was putting pressure on supermarkets to take action after a year-long study found all the major retailers failed to reach industry targets for reducing rates of campylobacter
Nearly indestructible virus yields tool to treat diseases By unlocking the secrets of a bizarre virus that survives in nearly boiling acid, scientists have found a blueprint for battling human disease using DNA clad in near-indestructible armor.
Study identifies Ebola virus's Achilles' heel The molecular "lock" that the deadly Ebola virus must pick to gain entry to cells has been identified by researchers. The findings, made in mice, suggest that drugs blocking entry to this lock could protect against Ebola infection
Herpes offers big insights on coughing -- and potential new remedies Cough treatments could change dramatically after the herpesvirus helped researchers discover that the respiratory tract links to two different parts of the nervous system.

Cancer Research:Breast cancer could be stopped in its tracks ♦ Study could explain why ovarian cancer treatments fail ♦ Proteins identified to target in osteosarcoma treatment

Breast cancer could be stopped in its tracks’ by new technique Certain breast cancers spread to the bones using an enzyme that drills “seed holes” for planting new tumours. The discovery could lead to treatments aimed at preventing secondary breast cancers in patients with non-hormone sensitive disease. The enzyme lysyl oxidase (Lox) is released from the primary tumour in the breast. Scientists found that it produces holes
Study could explain why ovarian cancer treatments fail Ovarian cancer cells can lock into survival mode and avoid being destroyed by chemotherapy. The research used whole genome sequencing to analyse tumor DNA samples from 91 patients with high-grade serous ovarian cancer
Researchers identify origin of chromosomal oddity in some cancer cells Surveys of the genomic terrain of cancer have turned up a curious phenomenon in some tumor cells: a massive rearrangement of DNA in one or a few chromosomes, thought to be produced during a single cell cycle. Scientists demonstrate how this sudden, isolated shuffling of genetic material can occur.
Scientists identify key to preventing secondary cancers Breast cancer is a disease that commonly spreads to other areas of the body; the most common site for the disease to spread is the bone. Leading scientists have identified a possible key to preventing secondary cancers in breast cancer patients, after discovering an enzyme that enhances the spread of the disease. They also report that an existing class of drugs for osteoporosis could stop the spread of the disease

Potential proteins identified to target in osteosarcoma treatment The genes and pathways that, when altered, can cause osteosarcoma have been identified by researchers using new models. The information could be used to better target treatments for the often-deadly type of cancer

Brain research: Magnetic milli robots offer hope for less-invasive surgery ♦ Scientists retrieve lost memories using Light ♦ Brain signals contain the code for your next move


Brain signals contain the code for your next move Is it possible to tap into the signalling in the brain to figure out what you will choose to do next? Researchers can now say yes, and have published a description of how this happens.
Study identifies brain regions activated when pain intensity doesn't match expectation Picture yourself in a medical office, anxiously awaiting your annual flu shot. The nurse casually states, "This won't hurt a bit." But when the needle pierces your skin it hurts, and it hurts a lot. Your expectations have been violated, and not in a good way
Scientists retrieve lost memories using Light Researchers have found that memories that have been 'lost' as a result of amnesia can be recalled by activating brain cells with light. They reactivated memories that could not otherwise be retrieved, using a technology known as optogenetics
How sleep helps us learn and memorize Sleep is important for long lasting memories, particularly during this exam season. New research suggests that sleeping triggers the synapses in our brain to both strengthen and weaken, which prompts the forgetting, strengthening or modification of our memories in a process known as long-term potentiation.
Medical, magnetic milli robots offer hope for less-invasive surgeries Seeking to advance minimally invasive medical treatments, researchers have proposed using tiny robots, driven by magnetic potential energy from magnetic resonance imaging scanners. The potential technology could be used to treat hydrocephalus and other conditions, allowing surgeons to avoid current treatments that require cutting through the skull to implant pressure-relieving shunts.




Antibiotic Resistance: Wastewater treatment may be creating antibiotic resistance ♦ Vulnerability found in some drug-resistant bacteria ♦ Drug resistant strain of typhoid spreading

New chip makes testing for antibiotic-resistant bacteria faster, easier Now, researchers have designed a diagnostic chip to reduce testing time of antibiotics from days to one hour, allowing doctors to pick the right antibiotic the first time
Genomic data reveals emergence in Africa of drug resistant strain of typhoid The emergence of a novel strain of Typhoid fever in Malawi,The H58-strain, which is likely to have emerged in Asia approximately thirty years ago, is now rapidly spreading across Africa, where it has been introduced on several separate occasions. This strain appears to be its ability to acquire resistance to commonly available antibiotics
New online tool to predict genetic resistance to tuberculosis drugs A new TB-Profiler tool analyses and interprets genome sequence data to predict resistance to 11 drugs used to fight TB. This tool finds which drugs to use for a patient with TB can be sped up by days or even weeks, increasing the likelihood of a cure.
Vulnerability found in some drug-resistant bacteria Analyzing the physical dynamics of all currently mapped structures in an important group of antibiotic-destroying enzymes has found a common structural feature. The apparently universal nature of this complex structural dynamic implies that it is critical to the antibiotic destroying properties of the enzyme and points to the possibility of finding a way to chemically disable the enzymes and bacterial antibiotic resistance.
Wastewater treatment may be creating new antibiotics Scientists have been aware of the potential problems of antibiotics being present in wastewater, and new research is showing that treatments to clean wastewater may actually be creating new antibiotics and further contributing to the development of antibiotic resistance in the environment

Friday, May 29, 2015

Great Britain: Mount Hood Porter beer recalled

Wiper and True is recalling bottles of its Mount Hood Porter beer because a manufacturing fault means the bottles might shatter. If you have this product, do not drink it. The FSA has issued a Product Recall Information Notice.
Bottle size: 500ml
Batch: 01
Barcode: 5060408200445
‘Best before’ date: 5 March 2016
The company is recalling the product, and has contacted its retail customers and collected remaining stock from local (Bristol) retail customers. The company has also updated its website and social media channels with the product recall notice. They have halted production until they feel confident that the issue has been resolved.
If you have any unopened bottles, do not attempt to transport or return them but dispose of the product immediately. Details on how to do this safely can be found in the product recall notice below.
If you have already consumed your purchase of Mount Hood Porter there is no need to be concerned.
In order to claim a full refund, please contact the retailer you bought it from. Any other questions can be addressed to the company by emailing hello@wiperandtrue.com  or by calling 01179 412 501.

Canada: Iron Cross Blister Beetles in packaged Vegetables

Iron Cross Blister Beetles in Imported Pre-packaged Leafy Vegetables
The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) is conducting an investigation into the presence of Iron Cross Blister beetles (Tegrodera spp.) in imported leafy vegetables following recent consumer complaints of these beetles in pre-packaged salads. There have been no confirmed illnesses or injuries associated with the consumption of these products.
Fresh produce can harbour insects that may be injurious to consumers, but this is rare. The Iron Cross Blister beetle is very distinctively coloured, with a bright red head and bright yellow markings on the wings, separated by a black "cross". This particular beetle should be treated with caution as it may release an irritating chemical called "cantharidin". This chemical may cause blisters at the point of contact.
Consumers are advised to wash and visually inspect their leafy vegetables thoroughly. The beetle should be removed without touching or crushing it. If found, please advise your local CFIA office.
More information will be shared with the public as it becomes available. The CFIA will take all necessary steps to protect the safety of the Canadian food supply.

Iron Cross Blister Beetle

Antibiotic approved for treating infant abdominal infections

The antibiotic was approved by the U. S. Food and Drug Administration for treating abdominal infections in children less than 3 months of age. The approval came after a study by a National Institutes of Health research network evaluated the drug in treating children in this age group.
The May 28 issue of The Federal Register described the study which supported the approval of meropenem for “complicated intra-abdominal infections” in children under 3 months of age. Among preterm infants, intestinal perforation or leakage — which is part of complicated intra-abdominal infection — may be life threatening. The study was undertaken under the terms of the Best Pharmaceuticals for Children Act, which directed NIH to conduct studies on drugs used in children but not previously tested in children or in specific pediatric age groups.
Meropenem is a broad spectrum antibiotic — effective against a wide variety of bacteria. The drug has been previously approved to treat complicated intra-abdominal infections and complicated skin infections in adults and older children, and for treating children 3 months of age and older with bacterial meningitis — an infection of the fluid bathing the brain and spinal cord. During the last several years, physicians have begun prescribing meropenem for preterm infants with serious abdominal infections. Because they lacked an effective alternative, many physicians had prescribed the drug for a use other than what the FDA had approved. The NIH study was undertaken in response to a written request from the FDA to evaluate the dosing and safety of meropenem in the treatment of complicated intra-abdominal infections in infants under 3 months of age.
“This study shows that meropenem is appropriate for treating complicated intra-abdominal infections in very young infants. In addition, we now have dosing guidelines for various age groups of premature infants,” said Anne Zajicek, M.D., Pharm.D., chief of the Obstetric and Pediatric Pharmacology and Therapeutics Branch at NIH’s Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), which funded the study.
Dr. Zajicek explained that physicians often need to extrapolate from studies of adults when prescribing for pediatric patients, because many drugs have never been tested specifically for use in children. However, because of their smaller size, differences in metabolism, and other physical differences from adults, many drugs may affect children differently than they do adults. Under the Best Pharmaceuticals for Children Act, NICHD works with FDA to identify drugs not tested in children to determine if they are appropriate for use in children.
The NICHD commissioned the study to investigate meropenem use in 200 infants under 3 months of age, including premature infants. Researchers examined how the drug was absorbed and distributed throughout the body, and used that information to develop dosing recommendations for different age groups of infants, including premature infants of different ages. In addition, the study evaluated side effects. Based on this study, treatment of infants with meropenem was safe and was not associated with increased risk for serious side effects.

Oregon confirms seventh meningococcal disease case

State confirms seventh meningococcal disease case
Oregon Public Health officials are confirming a seventh case of meningococcal disease linked to a University of Oregon outbreak – a 52-year-old man who visited his daughter on the UO campus May 2-3. They say it’s proof the illness lingers on campus, and students should immediately get vaccinated.
The university worked quickly to provide preventive antibiotic treatment to the man’s close contacts. Oregon Public Health and Lane County Public Health continue to work closely with UO to investigate this outbreak.
Parents and other campus visitors are not at increased risk of exposure to meningococcal B disease by simply visiting the UO campus. However, they can help reduce the transmission risk by covering their cough; washing and sanitizing their hands often; not sharing drinks, utensils, cigarettes or other smoking equipment or personal cosmetics that touch the lips; and knowing that kissing poses a risk.
UO students should get vaccinated against the disease right away, and be sure to complete the dose series, which is offered in two- and three-dose courses. So far, more than 10,000 UO students have received the first dose of the meningitis B vaccine. The goal is to vaccinate all University of Oregon undergraduate students. Additional information:

Thursday, May 28, 2015

Canada: President's Choice brand hummus and dip products recalled

The food recall warning issued on May 25, 2015 has been updated to include additional product information. This additional information was identified during the Canadian Food Inspection Agency's (CFIA) food safety investigation.
Loblaw Companies Limited is recalling President's Choice brand hummus and dip products from the marketplace because they may contain the toxin produced by Staphylococcus bacteria. Consumers should not consume the recalled products described below.
Recalled products
Brand Name
Common Name
Size
UPC
President's Choice
Roasted Garlic Hummus
454 g
0 60383 03583 9
President's Choice
Hummus
454 g
0 60383 03582 2
President's Choice
Spicy Hummus
227 g
0 60383 03598 3
President's Choice
Hummus
227 g
0 60383 03580 8
President's Choice
Spicy Hummus
454 g
0 60383 03597 6
President's Choice
Caramelized Vidalia Onion Hummus
227 g
0 60383 06051 0
President's Choice
Roasted Garlic Hummus
227 g
0 60383 03581 5
President's Choice
Roasted Garlic Red Pepper and Cumin Hummus
280 g
0 60383 13518 8
President's Choice
Roasted Pepper and Paprika Hummus
280 g
0 60383 13517 1
President's Choice
Roasted Red Pepper and Chipotle Hummus
280 g
0 60383 13519 5
President's Choice
Butter Bean & Roasted Garlic Hummus
280 g
0 60383 13392 4
President's Choice
Moroccan-Style Hummus
280 g
0 60383 13387 0
President's Choice
Olive Tapenade Hummus
280 g
0 60383 13388 7
President's Choice
Red Harissa Hummus
280 g
0 60383 13390 0
President's Choice
Sweet Potato and Harissa Dip
280 g
0 60383 13391 7
Check to see if you have recalled products in your home. Recalled products should be thrown out or returned to the store where it was purchased.
Food contaminated with Staphylococcus toxin may not look or smell spoiled. The toxin produced by Staphylococcus bacteria is not easily destroyed at normal cooking temperatures. Common symptoms of Staphylococcal poisoning are nausea, vomiting, abdominal cramping and fever. In severe cases of illness, headache, muscle cramping and changes in blood pressure and pulse rate may occur.
Loblaw Companies Limited: customerservice@presidentschoice.ca or 1-888-495-5111
  • President's Choice brand Hummus - 227 g
  •  
  • President's Choice brand Roasted Garlic Hummus - 227 g
  •  
  • President's Choice brand Spicy Hummus - 454 g
  • President's Choice brand Caramelized Vidalia Onion Hummus - 227 g
  •  
  • President's Choice brand Moroccan-Style Hummus - 280 g
  •  
  • President's Choice brand Olive Tapenade Hummus - 280 g
  • President's Choice brand Red Harissa Hummus - 280 g
  •  
  • President's Choice brand Sweet Potato and Harissa Dip - 280 g
  •  
  • President's Choice brand Butter Bean and Roasted Garlic Hummus - 280 g
  • President's Choice brand Roasted Garlic Red Pepper and Cumin Hummus - 280 g
  •  
  • President's Choice brand Roasted Pepper and Paprika Hummus - 280 g
  •  
  • President's Choice brand Roasted Red Pepper and Chipotle Hummus - 280 g