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Tuesday, December 31, 2013

Russian Herring Filet Recalled Due to Listeria

ZIP INTERNATIONAL GROUP LLC,  160 Raritan Center Parkway #6, Edison, NJ 08837, is recalling herring fillet in oil (FOSFOREL, ATLANTIKA) 200 grams in plastic packaging due to Listeria contamination.
Listeria monocytogenes is an organism which can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems. Although healthy individuals may suffer only short-term symptoms such as high fever, severe headache, stiffness, nausea, abdominal pain and diarrhea, Listeria infection can cause miscarriages and stillbirths among pregnant women.
The recalled herring fillet in oil (FOSFOREL, ATLANTIKA) 200 grams in plastic packaging includes best by dates 18/01/2014 (UPC: 4607106577526). The best by date is located on the round side of the packaging and was sold to retail grocery stores in New York State beginning on 11/07/2013 and ending on 12/12/2013. It is a product of Russia.
The recall was initiated after routine sampling by New York State Department of Agriculture & Markets Food Inspectors and subsequent analysis of the product by Food Laboratory personnel found the product to be positive for Listeria monocytogenes.
No illnesses have been reported to date in connection with this problem. Consumers who have purchased herring fillet in oil (FOSFOREL, ATLANTIKA) should not consume it, but should return it to the place of purchase. Consumers with questions may contact the company @ 732-225-3600, 9:00AM-5:00 PM EST from Monday to Friday.

Friday, December 27, 2013

BJ's Recalls Asiago Risotto Bites Due to Choking Hazard

BJ’s Wholesale Club has been notified by Stuffed Foods LLC that it is voluntarily recalling its Asiago Risotto Bites due to a potential choking hazard. To date, no illnesses or injuries have been reported in connection to this recall. Stuffed Foods issued this voluntary recall after they were notified by Biery Cheese, their Swiss cheese supplier, that the Swiss cheese they purchased may contain small pieces of plastic.
Asiago Risotto Bites that have a best by date of: November 7, 2014, November 13, 2014, November 14, 2014, November 20, 2014, and November 22, 2014 are affected by this recall.
If you purchased any of the recalled products, please discontinue use and discard the remaining Asiago Risotto Bites.  Please do not return the product to BJ’s.
For a full refund, please visit the Member Services Desk at your local BJ’s.
If you have any questions, please contact Stuffed Foods LLC Consumer Hotline at 978-203-0370, Monday – Friday, 9AM – 5PM.

12/27/13 Health News: Shipping Delays Hurt Perishable Foods, Drug Resistant TB Spreading, FDA Looking For new Antibiotic for drug resistant Bacteria

Shipping Debacle poses Threat to Perishable Food Business


A CNN report on shipping delays through UPS and FedEx over the Christmas holiday outlines the complex issues faced by affected businesses.
In a December 26 CNN report about the recent news regarding the widespread problems with shipping delays through UPS and FedEx over the Christmas holiday, the word “loss” stands out like a sore thumb. And businesses that count on a good amount of their online sales are standing on the sidelines awaiting the verdict on how the shipping giants plan to settle up at the end of the day.continue reading

Global Resistance to TB Drugs is 'Ticking Time Bomb'
Increasing resistance to tuberculosis drugs around the world is a "ticking time bomb", says the World Health Organization (WHO). It estimates almost 500,000 people around the world have a type of TB which is resistant to at least two of the main types of drugs used to treat the disease. But most are not diagnosed and are walking around spreading these more deadly strains. More than half the cases are in China, Russia and India.continue reading

FDA Seeks Anti-‘superbug’ Bill
The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) wants Congress to pass a bill to help the agency combat the scourge of germs that have grown resistant to antibiotic drugs. Legislation would allow the agency to create a program to develop special drugs designed to attack so-called “superbugs” that have become resistant to other medicine, the director of FDA's drug evaluation center, Janet Woodcock, said. Though the agency might have the legal power to develop a program on its own, Woodcock said, legislation would be the best way to start the initiative swiftly and forcefully.continue reading

Blue Cheese Recalled Due to Listeria

Flat Creek Farm & Dairy of Swainsboro, GA has recalled 200 pounds of Heavenly Blue cheese, because of potential contamination. As of November 27, 2013 at 11:00am, according to Flat Creek records, all of the purchasers have been notified and more than 90% of the product has been collected or destroyed.
Heavenly Blue was distributed in certain parts of Alabama, Georgia and Florida via and (3) online orders (www.flatcreekdairy.com), which have all been notified. The product is packed in clear plastic and ranges in sizes from 1/2 pound to whole wheels. The recall is specific to product marked with the lot code 130912XHB, which can be found on the front of the package.
The recall was the result of a routine sampling program conducted by the Georgia Department of Agriculture, which revealed that the finished products were contaminated. The company has identified the source of the problem and has eliminated it from future batches.
The product that has been recalled is potentially contaminated with Salmonella enteritidis, an organism which can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems. Healthy individuals may suffer only short-term symptoms such as high fever, severe headache, vomiting, nausea, abdominal pain and diarrhea. Long-term complications can include severe arthritis.
Consumers that have purchased this product are urged to return the product to the place of purchase. They may also call Flat Creek Dairy & Farm at 478-237-0123 from 8:00 a.m to 5:00 p.m. EST for more information.

Thursday, December 26, 2013

PROMISING MEDICAL ADVANCES IN 2013

Findings with Potential for Enhancing Human Health

Insights into Brain Injury
Concussions can have serious and lasting effects. However, the specific damage that occurs in affected brain tissue hasn’t been well understood. A study by NIH researchers provided insight into the damage caused by mild traumatic brain injury and suggested approaches for reducing its harmful effects.

Stem Cells Coaxed To Create Working Blood Vessels
In an NIH-funded study, scientists were able to direct human stem cells to form networks of tiny blood vessels that can connect to the existing circulation in mice. The finding might assist future efforts to repair and regenerate tissues and organs, which need an adequate blood supply to grow and survive.

Genomic Analysis of Endometrial Tumors
Pathologists currently classify endometrial tumors by examining tissue under a microscope. A comprehensive genomic analysis of nearly 400 endometrial tumors revealed 4 novel endometrial tumor subtypes and also found similarities to other cancers. The findings, by an NIH-funded research network, suggest that genomic classification of endometrial tumors could help guide treatment strategies.

Common Genetic Factors Found in 5 Mental Disorders
Autism, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), bipolar disorder, major depression, and schizophrenia were traditionally thought of as distinct mental disorders. However, their symptoms can overlap, making it difficult to distinguish between them. An international research consortium funded by NIH discovered that these disorders share certain genetic glitches. The finding may point to better ways to diagnose and treat these conditions.

Vaccine Clears Away Monkey AIDS Virus
HIV, which causes AIDS in people, and the similar monkey virus SIV are thought to cause permanent infections in the body. Current therapies can control but not eliminate the virus. In an NIH-funded study, an experimental vaccine triggered a lasting immune attack in monkeys that eliminated all traces of SIV infection after a year or more. The finding points to a new strategy in the search for an effective AIDS vaccine.

Method Quickly Assesses Antibiotics
Decades of widespread antibiotic use have encouraged the spread of bacteria with resistance to multiple antibiotics. To combat these -resistant bacteria, researchers have been searching for new classes of antibiotics that work by different mechanisms than current drugs. NIH-funded scientists developed an innovative method to quickly identify antibiotics that can treat multidrug-resistant bacteria—and reveal how these bacteria-killing medications work.

Strategy May Improve Survival after Shock
Shock is a life-threatening condition in which blood pressure drops and not enough blood and oxygen can get to organs. Inflammation has been strongly linked with shock, and past research suggests that this inflammation involves the digestive system. An NIH-funded study of rats found that blocking digestive enzymes in intestines increases survival, reduces organ damage, and improves recovery after shock. The approach may lead to new therapies to improve patient outcomes.

Wednesday, December 25, 2013

Recall: Burn 7 Capsules Contain Dangerous Drug.

burn 7 capsule label 1 Deseo Rebajar Inc., is voluntarily recalling lot #MFD: 07.18.2013 (Exp: 07.17.2015) of Burn 7 Capsules to the consumer level. The FDA laboratory analysis of this dietary supplement found theBurn 7 Capsules product to contain undeclared Sibutramine. Sibutramine was a previously approved controlled substance for the treatment of obesity that was removed from the U.S. market in October 2010 for safety reasons.
Sibutramine is known to substantially increase blood pressure and/or pulse rate in some patients and may present a significant risk to patients with a history of coronary artery disease, congestive heart failure, arrhythmias, or stroke. Sibutramine has been withdrawn from U.S marketplace. The active drug ingredient is not listed on the label for these products.
 The recalled products are packaged in 30-count plastic bottles labeled with lot number #MFD: 07.18.2013.
The product lot was sold directly to individual customers in our offices in Fajardo, Caguas and Bayamon and in website www.deseorebajar.com. We sincerely regret any inconvenience to our customers.
Consumers with questions should contact Deseo Rebajar Inc. at 787.961.6464 or via email at sales@adipotrim.com Monday - Friday, 8:00 am - 5:00 pm, [GMT time zone]. Consumers should contact their physician or healthcare provider if they have experienced any problems that may be related to taking or using this drug product.
Adverse events that may be related to the use of this product may be reported to FDA's MedWatch Adverse Event Reporting program either online, by regular mail or by fax.
Deseo Rebajar Inc. is taking this voluntary action because it is committed to the health and safety of its customers and to the quality of its select brands. We are working diligently to make available appropriate natural herbal regulations. We are moving forward with new custom formula. We value our relationship with you and will continue to provide you with the best

Tuesday, December 24, 2013

More May's Chicken Recalled



Palama Holdings, LLC, a Kapolei, HI establishment, is expanding its recall of raw, frozen marinated chicken products to approximately 24,784 pounds because they may have experienced temperature abuse in the distribution chain, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced today. The expanded recall covers all teriyaki chicken products produced at the company’s Kapolei, HI plant with “Best by” dates ranging Sept. 24, 2014 to November 6, 2014.
The products subject to recall include:
10-lb. cardboard boxes, containing four individual cryovac sealed packages of May’s Hawaii “Hawaiian Style, Boneless and Skinless Teriyaki Chicken Thighs.”
5-lb. cardboard boxes, containing two individual cryovac sealed packages of May’s Hawaii “Hawaiian Style, Boneless and Skinless Teriyaki Chicken Thighs.”
2-lb. cardboard boxes, containing one cryovac sealed package of May’s Hawaii “Hawaiian Style, Boneless and Skinless Teriyaki Chicken Thighs.”    
The products were produced on various dates between Sept. 24, 2013 and Nov. 6, 2013 then were distributed for retail sale on the islands of Oahu, Maui, Kauai and Hawaii, and to a nearby military commissary. The packages bear the establishment number “P-11077” in the USDA mark of inspection on the package.
FSIS personnel discovered bloated boxes of the products at a retail location in recent days. The problem was initially discovered during shipment when the company’s distributor observed boxes of product swollen with gases from the bagged chicken, an indication that there may have been temperature abuse during storage prior to distribution.
FSIS and the company have received no reports of adverse reactions due to consumption of these products. Anyone concerned about a reaction should contact a healthcare provider.
Consumers and media with questions about the recall may contact Gary Hanagami, May’s Hawaii vice president of retail sales, at (808) 682-8300.


Don’t Let Your Children Read This Post


Don’t Let Your Children Read This Post
Christmas has been canceled in several states. Santa is afraid to go into houses in states where they have  the Stand Your Ground Law. Especially in Florida where has to go in through the window because they do not have chimneys.
Mrs Claus suggested he get a bulletproof vest but santa felt that they could still hit him in the knee. Plus he has not had the time to sign up for Obama care yet. Mrs Claus is very upset. She wants all the presents out of the house so she can do her cleaning.
One of the elves suggested they could get the states to ban the use of the Stand Your Ground Law on Christmas but there was not the time, plus it is impossible to get politicians to agree on anything these days.
Another elves suggested they get the children to hide their eyes and come in the day time but you know they would peek. Well Maybe next year they will figure something out

Merry Christmas


CLINICAL BREAKTHROUGHS in 2013

Prevention, Diagnosis, and Treatment of Human Disease
Malaria kills hundreds of thousands of people each year, most of them young children in Sub-Saharan Africa. While scientists have made significant gains in understanding, treating, and preventing the disease, a vaccine has remained elusive. NIH researchers reported that a candidate malaria vaccine is safe and protected against infection in an early-stage clinical trial.

Women at risk for breast cancer may take certain types of medications that reduce the chance of developing the cancer. But in rare cases, the drugs can cause dangerous side effects. Many women decide that the chance of success doesn’t outweigh the risks. An international research team, with NIH support, found genetic variations that can be used to identify women who are most likely to benefit from this potentially life-saving strategy—and who should avoid it.

After a kidney transplant, patients must take medications with toxic side effects to keep their immune system from attacking the new organ. If doctors could track rejection status over time, they could adjust drug doses for more effective treatment. NIH-funded researchers found that certain molecules in urine can provide an early sign of transplant rejection. The test could allow doctors to act early to protect transplanted kidneys.

When adult patients with B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia have remission followed by relapse, the prognosis is poor. An NIH-funded team used a type of targeted immunotherapy to induce remission in 5 patients with this aggressive form of leukemia. The early results of the ongoing trial highlight the potential of this approach.

After a stroke, treatment for patients at high risk for a second stroke typically involves a medical program that includes blood-thinning medications and control of blood pressure and cholesterol. In hopes of improving the odds, doctors over the past decade began to also use an intracranial artery stent. An NIH-funded clinical trial confirmed earlier findings that stenting adds no benefits over aggressive medical treatment alone for most of these patients.

Warfarin is often prescribed to prevent blood clots in people with certain conditions. But determining the best dose can be tricky. Too much can cause excess bleeding; too little can lead to dangerous clots. Past research suggested that adding genetic data to clinical information would improve initial dosing. But an NIH-funded study contradicted that result, highlighting the importance of using clinical trials to assess the role of genetics in optimizing treatments.

Autism symptoms first appear during early childhood, and a definitive diagnosis can often be made by 2 years of age. Scientists have long been searching for ways to identify the condition at even younger ages, since outcomes tend to be better with earlier intervention. NIH-funded researchers found evidence that infants later diagnosed with autism show a steady decline in eye contact beginning as young as 2 months of age.

Past research has linked obesity to heart disease risk. But few studies have examined how the duration of obesity affects heart disease. NIH researchers found that how long a young adult is obese may affect that person’s heart disease risk in middle age. The finding suggests that not only preventing but also delaying the onset of obesity can help reduce heart disease later in life.


Monday, December 23, 2013

New Autism Screening Tool Offers More Precise Assessment

Testing during routine checkups indicates earlier diagnosis possible
An updated screening tool that physicians administer to parents to help determine if a very young child has autism has been shown to be much more accurate than earlier versions at identifying children who could benefit from further evaluation, according to researchers supported by the National Institutes of Health.
The Modified Checklist for Autism in Toddlers — Revised, with Follow-Up (M-CHAT–R/F) — is a free, two-step screening tool used to detect children likely to have autism. It is intended for use at regular well-child checkups for children 16 to 30 months old. With the M-CHAT-R/F, health care providers can classify a child’s risk of having autism as low, medium or high, on the basis of parents’ answers to 20 questions.
“This checklist can more accurately identify children likely to have autism so they can get the treatment and support they need,” said Alice Kau, Ph.D., of the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), the NIH institute that funded the study. “Given that the typical autism diagnosis occurs at age 4, it also offers the possibility of detecting autism much earlier — during regular doctor’s visits when a child is 18 months or 2 years old. And earlier intervention has been shown to improve outcomes for children with autism.”
A score in the high-risk range warrants a referral for further evaluation for possible autism. For a child determined to be at medium risk, M-CHAT R/F includes a follow-up questionnaire used soon after the original evaluation to obtain additional information needed to more definitively classify the child as either high risk or low risk.
Based on the M-CHAT-R/F classifications, the researchers found that a smaller proportion of children received a medium- or high-risk assessment (7 percent) than with earlier versions of the checklist (9 percent). However, more total cases of autism were detected with the revised checklist than with earlier versions (67 cases per 10,000 screened vs 45 cases per 10,000 screened).
Of the more than 16,000 children evaluated with the screening tool, 93 percent of the children screened were considered low-risk, 6 percent were in the medium-risk range and 1 percent were considered high-risk.
Of all the children who determined by the test to be at risk after the M-CHAT-R/F follow-up, 95 percent were eventually found to have some form of developmental delay, including more than 47 percent with autism spectrum disorder.
First author Diana L. Robins, Ph.D., of Georgia State University (GSU), in Atlanta, conducted the research with GSU colleague KarĂ­s Casagrande, and Marianne Barton, Ph.D., Chi-Ming Chen, Ph.D., Thyde Dumont-Mathieu, M.D., M.P.H., and Deborah Fein, Ph.D., all of the University of Connecticut in Storrs. Dr. Fein was the study’s senior author.
The findings appear in Pediatrics.
The researchers updated an earlier version of the autism screening tool, adding examples, rephrasing some questions and dropping others that previously did not elicit strong responses. Using the revised tool, the researchers worked with healthcare providers to screen more than 15,000 toddlers considered at low risk for autism.
“Earlier tools cast a wider net, but these refinements will allow healthcare providers to focus energy where it is needed most and will reduce the number of families who go through additional testing but which ultimately do not need treatment interventions,” said Dr. Fein.
The free autism screening tool  is available online in more than 45 languages.

12/23/13 Health News: H1N1 Flu Kills 6, Food Poisoning Hit the Military, Apples Decrease Heart Attacks in Elderly

H1N1 Flu Kills 6 People, Leaves 14 Critically Ill in Greater Houston Area
HOUSTON Health officials say there have been six confirmed deaths from H1N1 in the Houston area recently, KHOU 11 News confirmed Thursday afternoon. That includes the four deaths at Conroe Regional Medical Center.
At least 14 people have become critically ill in Harris, Montgomery and Jefferson counties, including the four patients at Conroe Regional Medical Center. This is the same strain of H1N1 that caused a pandemic in 2009 Continue Reading

STAPHYLOCOCCAL FOOD POISONING HIT MILITARY UNIT IN 2012
A total of 22 people fell ill with Staphylococcal food poisoning after an undisclosed military unit luncheon in July 2012, according to information made available in the latest Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The newly revealed outbreak serves as a reminder of the importance of properly... Continue Reading

Apple-a-day Call for All Over-50’s

If everyone over the age of 50 ate an apple a day, 8,500 deaths from heart attacks and strokes could be avoided every year in the UK, say researchers. Apples would give a similar boost to cardiovascular health as medicines, such as statins, yet carry none of the side-effects, the University of Oxford researchers say in the BMJ. Continue reading

Sunday, December 22, 2013

Italy: Iranian Pistachios are recalled Due To Aflatoxin

The company Murano Spa informs us that he had asked supermarkets to withdraw the lot from the shelves of Iranian pistachios C234 Crunchy Snack Fairy brand Quality & Convenience, due to the excessive presence of aflatoxins.
The company announced the withdrawal in accordance with the precautionary principle, even if the limits are exceeded analytical detected is modest and there is an ongoing review of the analysis at the National Institute of Health. The batch of pistachios under indictment, was distributed to small and medium-sized supermarket chains located throughout the country. The consumers who have home-packs of pistachios with this lot are advised not to consume them.

Aflatoxins are toxic and among the most carcinogenic substances known. It is produced by fungi.

Zika Fever Spreading Outside Africa

The French Polynesia Department of Health said as of 3 Dec 2013, there have been 99 laboratory confirmed cases and 35 000 suspected cases of Zika fever reported. No hospitalizations or deaths have been reported.
Zika fever is an illness caused by a virus that spreads through mosquito bites.
Zika virus (ZIKV) is a flavivirus related to yellow fever, dengue, West Nile, and Japanese encephalitis viruses; but it produces a comparatively mild disease in humans. It was first isolated from an infected rhesus monkey in the Zika Forest of Uganda in 1947.
Symptoms of Zika fever may include fever, headache, red eyes, rash, muscle aches, and joint pains. The illness is usually mild and lasts 4-7 days.
Some experts note that because the virus has spread outside Africa and Asia, ZIKV should be considered an emerging pathogen.
ZIKV illness to date has been mild and self-limited, but before West Nile virus caused large outbreaks of neuroinvasive disease in Romania and in North America, it was also considered to be a relatively innocuous pathogen, some experts warn.
There is currently no vaccine or medicine to prevent Zika fever. Travelers can protect themselves by preventing mosquito bites.
The extent and intensity of the Zika virus outbreak on French Polynesia is much greater than in previous reports.  Cases have occurred in New Caledonia, and it would not be surprising if cases begin to appear in other Pacific Islands as well.
A CDC report states the extent that Zika virus transmission is occurring in French Polynesia: "The French Polynesia Department of Health has confirmed an outbreak of Zika fever in Tahiti and the other islands that make up the country (Tahaa, Uturoa, Bora-Bora, Taiohae, and Arutua). Several hundred cases are suspected. No hospitalizations or deaths have been reported." (http://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/notices/watch/zika-fever-french-polynesia-tahiti).

Sesame Hummus Recalled Due to Listeria

Spokane Produce, Inc., of Spokane Washington is recalling approximately 59 lbs of Victor’s Sesame Hummus due to concerns about possible Listeria Monocytogenes, an organism which can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems. Although healthy individuals may suffer only short-term symptoms such as high fever, severe headache, stiffness, nausea, abdominal pain and diarrhea, listeria infection can cause miscarriages and stillbirths among pregnant women.
The following product is subject to the voluntary recall:
11oz labeled “Victor™ - Toasted Sesame Hummus” with UPC 6 09722 76501 5, best by 12/29/13.
The hummus was distributed to retail locations (Rosauers, Brewster Market, SuperOne) in Washington and Montana.
Listeria Species were discovered during routine testing of the newly released product. The listeria test utilized is an indicator of several species of listeria and does not specifically indicate listeria monocytogenes.
Consumers who have purchased Victor™ - Toasted Sesame Hummus are urged not to eat it and to dispose of it or return it to the place of purchase for a full refund.

12/22/2013 Health News: Grizzly Bears Studied In Obesity Research, Dogs Help Infants with Asthma, Vitamin D Studys


To Learn About Obesity, Researchers Turn to Grizzly Bears
On a recent visit to a laboratory where he researches obesity, Kevin Corbit walked over to one of the patients he is studying to say hello. He believes insights gleaned from the animals, who can take in as much as 58,000 calories in a day and weigh 1,000 pounds, could reshape understanding of obesity and identify new treatments for a condition that has stymied doctors and drug developers.continue reading
Dogs May Guard Babies Against Asthma, Allergies
Researchers say they've discovered why infants who live in homes with a dog are less likely to develop asthma and allergies later in childhood. The team conducted experiments with mice and found that exposing them to dust from homes where dogs live triggered changes in the community of microbes that live in the infant's gut and reduced immune system response to common allergens. The scientists also identified a specific species of gut bacteria that's crucial in protecting the airways against allergens and viruses that cause respiratory infections.continue reading
Limits of Vitamin D Supplements

A large review of studies has found that vitamin D supplements have little or no benefit beyond the low levels required for bone health. continue reading

Friday, December 20, 2013

Marinated Chicken Recalled

Palama Holdings, LLC, a Kapolei, HI establishment, is recalling approximately 3,600 pounds of raw, frozen marinated chicken products because they may have experienced temperature abuse in the distribution chain, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced today.
Label, recalled productThe products subject to recall include a 10-lb. cardboard boxes, containing 4 individual cryovac sealed packages of May’s Hawaii “Hawaiian Style, Boneless and Skinless Teriyaki Chicken Thighs.”
The products were produced Oct. 15, 2013 and Nov. 5, 2013 then were distributed for retail sale in the Hawaiian islands of Oahu, Maui and Kauai and to a nearby military commissary. The packages bear the establishment number “EST. P-11077” in the USDA mark of inspection on the package.
The problem was discovered during shipment when the company’s distributor observed boxes of product swollen with gases from the bagged chicken, an indication that there may have been temperature abuse during storage prior to product distribution.
FSIS and the company have received no reports of adverse reactions due to consumption of these products. Anyone concerned about a reaction should contact a healthcare provider.
Consumers with questions about the recall may contact Gary Hanagami, May’s Hawaii vice president of retail sales, at (808) 682-8300.
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12/20/2013 health News: 416 People Sick From Foster Farms, Will Your Grandchildren have Oranges, AG-GAG Law Attacked.

CDC REPORTS 416 PEOPLE SICK IN FOSTER FARMS SALMONELLA OUTBREAK
As the safe food project of The Pew Charitable Trusts released its report on weaknesses in Salmonella regulation on Thursday, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention offered an update on the ongoing outbreak of multidrug-resistant Salmonella Heidelberg linked to chicken produced by Foster Farms. At least 416 people in 23 states and Puerto Rico have been sickened,... Continue Reading


USDA STEPS UP CITRUS GREENING FIGHT AS GMO FIX LOOKS PROMISING

CENTER FOR FOOD SAFETY SUPPORTS LEGAL CHALLENGE TO UTAH’S ‘AG-GAG’ LAW
Since an animal activist arrested last spring under Utah’s new “agricultural operation interference” statute had the charges quickly dismissed because she was on public property at the time of the incident, Utah’s attorney general wants a constitutional challenge to the law tossed as well. But a major food safety group Wednesday argued the benefit of...Continue Reading

Ireland: Gouda Cheese Made From Raw Milk Recalled

Verocytotoxigenic Escherichia coli (VTEC) has been detected in several batches of gouda cheese produced by Kilshanny Farmhouse Cheese using raw milk.  The company has been ordered by the Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine to withhold placing any further batches on the market. The approval number is IE 1859 EC. All batches produced since August 29, 2013 are included in the recall.
Consumers are advised not to eat the implicated cheese.
VTEC may cause severe bloody diarrhoea and abdominal cramps, although sometimes the infection causes non-bloody diarrhoea or no symptoms. In some groups, particularly children under 5 years of age and the elderly. The infection can also cause a complication called haemolytic uraemic syndrome (HUS),which can lead to kidney failure.
Inspectors:Food businesses who have been selling the implicated gouda cheese are requested to remove them from sale and clearly display a point of sale notice informing customers not to eat it.