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Wednesday, January 13, 2016

Brain Research: Cocaine addiction: Scientists discover 'backdoor' into the brain ♦ People who experience rage attacks have smaller 'emotional brains'

Changes in brain connectivity protect against developing bipolar disorder Naturally occurring changes in brain wiring can help patients at high genetic risk of developing bipolar disorder avert the onset of the illness
Beneficial effects of blocking brain inflammation in an experimental model of Alzheimer's Blocking a receptor in the brain responsible for regulating immune cells could protect against the memory and behavior changes seen in the progression of Alzheimer's disease. It was originally thought that Alzheimer's disease disturbs the brain's immune response, but this latest study adds to evidence that inflammation in the brain can in fact drive the development of the disease. The findings suggest that by reducing this inflammation, progression of the disease could be halted.
Cocaine addiction: Scientists discover 'backdoor' into the brain Individuals addicted to cocaine may have difficulty in controlling their addiction because of a previously-unknown 'back door' into the brain, circumventing their self-control,
People who experience rage attacks have smaller 'emotional brains' Neuroimaging studies suggest that frontolimbic regions of the brain, structures that regulate emotions, play an important role in the biology of aggressive behavior. A new article reports that individuals with intermittent explosive disorder (IED) have significantly lower gray matter volume in these frontolimbic brain structures. In other words, these people have smaller "emotional brains."

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