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Wednesday, June 24, 2015

Brain Research: Better outcome prediction of postanoxic coma ♦ Functioning brain follows famous sand pile model ♦ Consciousness has less control than believed,

Better outcome prediction of postanoxic coma EEG-measurements enable better prediction of the outcome of a coma that was caused by a lack of oxygen to the brain. A new method helps to make reliable and correct estimates in about 50% of patients, instead of only 10% of patients with the methods currently used. This involves continuous EEG-measurements focussing on the speed with which the brain's activity recovers. It seems that recovery over time is a better indicator of the severity of brain damage than single brief measurements.
Functioning brain follows famous sand pile model In 1999 Danish scientist Per Bak made the startling proposal that the brain remained stable for much the same reason a sand pile does; many small avalanches hold it at a balance point, where -- in the brain's case -- information processing is optimized. Now scientists have showed for the first time that a brain receiving and processing sensory input follows these dynamics.
Consciousness has less control than believed, according to new theory Consciousness -- the internal dialogue that seems to govern one's thoughts and actions -- is far less powerful than people believe, serving as a passive conduit rather than an active force that exerts control, according to a new theory proposed by a researcher.
Telomere G-tail: Useful marker of endothelial dysfunction, stroke and dementia A promising biomarker for the severity of age-related white matter changes (ARWMCs) and endothelial function was recently evaluated. The researchers investigated the association between the telomere G-tail length of leukocytes and vascular risk, ARWMCs, and endothelial function. They suggested that the telomere G-tail might be a useful marker of endothelial dysfunction, as well as stroke and dementia

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