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Tuesday, November 4, 2014

11/4/14 Health News: MRSA Transfers From Livestock to Humans ♦ Genes associated with autism ♦ Parasite-schizophrenia connection ♦ Clean smell doesn't always mean clean

UK RESEARCH SHOWS MRSA TRANSFERS FROM LIVESTOCK TO HUMANS


New research from the U.K. supports the theory that antibiotic-resistant bacteria in livestock can be transmitted to humans. Scientists at the University of Edinburgh studied the evolutionary history of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) clonal complex 398 (CC398), mapping the full genetic code of the strains from the U.K. and comparing them with published genetic data... Continue Reading
Clean smell doesn't always mean clean air
Scientists are taking a closer look at aerosol formation involving an organic compound -- called limonene -- that provides the pleasant smell of cleaning products and air fresheners. This research will help to determine what byproducts these sweet-smelling compounds are adding to the air while we are using them to remove germs and odors Continue Reading
Dozens of genes associated with autism in new research
Two major genetic studies of autism, involving more than 50 laboratories worldwide, have newly implicated dozens of genes in the disorder. The research shows that rare mutations in these genes affect communication networks in the brain and compromise fundamental biological mechanisms that govern whether, when, and how genes are activated overall Continue Reading
Parasite-connection: One-fifth of schizophrenia cases may involve the parasite T. gondii
Many factors, both genetic and environmental, have been blamed for increasing the risk of a diagnosis of schizophrenia. Some, such as a family history of schizophrenia, are widely accepted. Others, such as infection with Toxoplasma gondii, a parasite transmitted by soil, undercooked meat and cat feces, are still viewed with skepticism. A new study used epidemiological modeling methods to determine the proportion of schizophrenia cases that may be attributable to T. gondii infection. The work suggests that about one-fifth of cases may involve the parasite  Continue Reading

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