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Saturday, June 13, 2015

Brain Research:New vision on amygdala after study on testosterone and fear ♦ Cell density remains constant as brain shrinks with age ♦ More complete picture of sleep and memory

Neuroscience and psychology paint more complete picture of sleep and memory A new study integrates neuroscience and psychological research to reveal how sleep suppresses certain nerve cell activity that promotes forgetting, insuring that at least some memories will last.
Longitudinal brain changes during transition from adolescence to adulthood found in ASD The atypical trajectory of cortical/brain development in autism spectrum disorder extends well beyond young childhood and into late adolescence and young adulthood, a new study demonstrates.
Cell density remains constant as brain shrinks with age New, ultra-high-field magnetic resonance images (MRI) of the brain provide the most detailed images to date to show that while the brain shrinks with age, brain cell density remains constant.
New vision on amygdala after study on testosterone and fear The activity of the emotion centres in the brain – the amygdalae – is influenced by motivation rather than by the emotions themselves. This can be concluded from research carried out into the hormone testosterone. Testosterone increases amygdala activity in a person who is approaching a socially threatening situation and decreases the activity when such a situation is avoided. It was already known that the amygdala response to images of angry faces was stronger in a person who had received testosterone. This new study shows that this only happens when people approach angry faces and not when they avoid them.

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