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Wednesday, June 17, 2015

Cancer Research: Drug trials in pet dogs with cancer may speed advances in human oncology ♦ new stem cell population important in the growth of colon cancer ♦ HPV-positive oropharyngeal cancer survival

Scientists are first to see elements transform at atomic scale Chemists have witnessed atoms of one chemical element morph into another for the first time ever -- a feat that produced an unexpected outcome that could lead to a new way to safely treat cancer with radiation.
ALK1 protein may play a role in breast cancer metastasis Breast cancer patients with high levels of the protein activin-like receptor kinase (ALK1) in the blood vessels of their tumors were more likely to develop metastatic disease, research shows. This makes inhibition of the ALK1 pathway a possible new target for the treatment of metastatic breast cancer
Blood antibodies may predict HPV-positive oropharyngeal cancer survival The presence of certain human papillomavirus (HPV)-16 antibodies in the blood was associated with improved rates of survival among patients with HPV-related oropharyngeal carcinoma.
Drug trials in pet dogs with cancer may speed advances in human oncology Pet dogs may be humans' best friends in a new arena of life: cancer treatment, says a veterinary clinical medicine. Physiological similarities between dogs and humans, and conserved genetics between some dog and human cancers, can allow pet dogs to serve as useful models for studying new cancer drugs.
Researchers identify new stem cell population important in the growth of colon cancer A previously unknown, long-lived radiation-resistant stem cell population in the colon has been identified by researchers. Most importantly, they also found that these stem cells can give rise to colonic tumors and sustain their growth. The findings will significantly change the way we study and treat colon cancer.

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