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Friday, June 12, 2015

Cardiovascular Research: Heart attack risk increases 16-21% with use of common antacid ♦ Faulty gene can trigger fatal heart condition ♦ Antibiotic-laced sponges reduce exsternal infections in cardiac surgery

Heart attack risk increases 16-21% with use of common antacid Adults who use proton pump inhibitors are between 16 and 21 percent more likely to experience a heart attack than people who don't use the commonly prescribed antacid drugs
Obesity linked to adrenal disorder in teens may increase risk for cardiovascular disease Adolescents and young adults with congenital adrenal hyperplasia have significantly increased amounts of abdominal fat tissue, placing them at greater risk for harmful conditions linked to obesity, including cardiovascular disease.
How a faulty gene can trigger fatal heart condition New research has revealed how a faulty gene can cause fatal abnormal heart rhythms that are brought on by exercise.
Stroke education helps patients recognize stroke symptoms, encourages fast response Clear, simple preparedness messages can help patients recognize symptoms of a subsequent stroke and speed up emergency room arrival times. Stroke education materials dramatically improved hospital arrival times, specifically among Hispanic stroke patients.
Implantable antibiotic-laced sponges reduce exsternal infections in cardiac surgery Cardiac surgeons often "crack open" the flat bone that forms the middle front section of the chest, known as the sternum, in order to reach important structures. When a sternal wound infection occurs, serious complications and even death may result. Implanting antibiotic-laden sponges between the sternal halves before closure has been adapted to prevent infections. While a recent report questioned this practice, a meta-analysis clearly established that the sponges do work.

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