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Tuesday, December 1, 2015

Immune Research: Immune cells make appendix 'silent hero' of digestive health ♦ A molecular switch to stop inflammation ♦ Alerting the immune system's watchmen to improve vaccines

Immune cells make appendix 'silent hero' of digestive health Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) are crucial for protecting against bacterial infection in people with compromised immune systems, report investigators.A network of immune cells helps the appendix to play a pivotal role in maintaining health of the digestive system, supporting the theory that the appendix isn't redundant
Neutrophils starve fungal invaders The most frequent immune cells in the human blood, so-called neutrophils, efficiently kill invading microorganisms and slowly starve microbes to death by removing crucial trace elements.
A molecular switch to stop inflammation Our immune system is vital to us and can sometimes overreact causing chronic illnesses, such as for instance rheumatism and allergy. Now, researchers have identified a molecular switch – MYSM1 – that can suppress such an overreaction and avoid inflammation
Alerting the immune system's watchmen to improve inflammation As the days get colder and shorter, we carve jack-o-lanterns and drink pumpkin spice lattes. But one fall tradition can actually keep you healthy: getting your flu shot. Like all vaccines, the flu shot trains the immune system to fend off infection, but some need help to produce the full effect. Researchers now report a new way to help improve vaccines using molecules that more effectively direct the immune system

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