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Tuesday, October 27, 2015

Cancer Research: A new way to starve lung cancer? ♦ Biologists unravel drug-resistance mechanism in tumor cells ♦ Natural protein cage developed for improved cancer drug deliver

A new way to starve lung cancer? Scientists have identified a new way to stop the growth of lung cancer cells, by blocking their ability to use alternative sources of nutrition. The discovery was made possible by identifying the metabolic programs used by cancer cells to fuel their growth. The findings point to possible new avenues for treating lung cancer, which is the second most common cancer and accounts for over one-quarter of all cancer-related deaths.
Biologists unravel drug-resistance mechanism in tumor cells Cancer biologists have discovered that targeting the RNA-binding protein that promotes drug-resistance could lead to better cancer therapies.
Targeting invasive cells not dividing cells to halt cancer Most cancer drugs are designed to target dividing cells, but a new study suggests that targeting invasive cells may be a new strategy to treat metastatic cancer.
Newly discovered tumor-suppressor gene affects melanoma survival Scientists have found a tumor suppressor gene, RASA2, that drives a particularly deadly form of melanoma as well as regulates a key protein, RAS, that is a major oncogene. The discovery is “highly likely to have direct clinical relevance,”
Natural protein cage developed for improved cancer drug delivery A unique, tiny protein cage has been created by scientists to deliver nasty chemotherapy chemicals directly to cancer cells. Direct delivery could improve treatment and lessen what can be horrendous side effects from toxic drugs

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