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Tuesday, August 11, 2015

Cancer Research:Nerve-guiding protein that aids pancreatic cancer spread ♦ Drug candidate kills cancer cells through over stimulation ♦ Advanced cell screening technology for cancer immunotherapy

Researchers identify nerve-guiding protein that aids pancreatic cancer spread Scientists have identified a molecular partnership in pancreatic cancer cells that might help to explain how the disease spreads -- metastasizes -- in some cases. Their findings reveal urgently needed new targets to treat pancreatic cancer, which strikes nearly 50,000 people in the US each year and has only a 5 percent survival rate five years after diagnosis.
Drug candidate kills cancer cells through overstimulation A drug candidate that overstimulates proteins crucial for tumor growth shows promise as a new strategy to treat a wide range of cancers. The demands of rapid cell division put a strain on cancer cells, and the approach works by tipping cell stress over the edge. Researchers show that the drug candidate inhibits tumor growth in a mouse model of breast cancer and efficiently kills a broad range of human cancer cells.
Poor survival among colorectal cancer patients tied to biomarker csn6 A protein called CSN6 has been found to be correlated with poor survival among patients with colorectal cancer, according to a study. The study revealed that CSN6, a subunit of a protein complex known as COP9 signalsome, is overexpressed in colorectal cancer tissue samples. The finding could be significant in the search for alternative treatment strategies for colorectal cancer.
Researchers develop advanced cell screening technology for cancer immunotherapy Researchers have created a new method for screening cells used in immunotherapy cancer treatments, allowing high-performing immune system cells to be studied in isolation and potentially expanding the number of patients for whom the breakthrough treatment proves successful.

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