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Tuesday, August 4, 2015

Children's Health: Exercise during adolescence linked to lowered risk of death later ♦ Computer games can pick up dyslexia ♦ Study sheds surprising light on the causes of cerebral palsy

Exercise during adolescence linked to lowered risk of death later Women who participated in exercise as adolescents had a reduced risk of death from cancer and all causes in their middle and older ages. After adjusting for socioeconomic factors in adult life, the researchers found that women who participated in exercise as adolescents for 1.33 hours a week or less had a 16 percent lowered risk for death from cancer, and a 15 percent lowered risk for death from all causes; those who participated in exercise as adolescents for more than 1.33 hours a week had a 13 percent lowered risk for death from all causes.
Computer games can pick up dyslexia in minority pupils While pupils from minority groups are over-represented in Norwegian special needs education, practically no children from these groups are diagnosed with dyslexia. As a consequence many miss out on important help. Researchers are studying whether a computer game can pick up dyslexia in pupils from minority groups
New survey enhances precision of distinguishing between expectable vs. worrisome early childhood misbehavior Researchers are using a novel dimensional method for distinguishing misbehavior that is expectable in early childhood versus that which is cause for clinical concern. Using a survey developed by the researchers to enhance precision of clinical identification in early childhood the Multidimensional Assessment Profile of Disruptive Behavior (MAP-DB), scientists obtained mothers' reports of their preschoolers' irritability at multiple time points. They used these irritability patterns to predict which preschoolers would exhibit problems that interfered with their behavior.
Study sheds surprising light on the causes of cerebral palsy Cerebral palsy is the most common cause of physical disability in children. It has historically been considered to be caused by factors such as birth asphyxia, stroke and infections in the developing brain of babies. In a new game-changing study, a research team has uncovered strong evidence for genetic causes of cerebral palsy.

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