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Tuesday, August 25, 2015

children's Health: Sexting and internet safety ♦ Maltreated children's brains show 'encouraging' ability to regulate emotions ♦ Teen smokers struggle with body-related shame, guilt

Sexting and internet safety climb top 10 list of health concerns for children across the U. S. With more kids online and using cell phones at increasingly younger ages, two issues have quickly climbed higher on the public's list of major health concerns for children across the U.S: sexting and Internet safety.
Teen smokers struggle with body-related shame, guilt Are teen smokers who pick up the habit doing so because they have a negative self-image? Does the typical teenaged smoker try to balance out this unhealthy habit with more exercise? And if so, then why would an adolescent smoke, yet still participate in recommended levels of physical activity?
Complete resection of high-grade brain cancer yields better survival in children -- especially girls For children with aggressive brain cancers called high-grade gliomas, the chances of survival are improved when surgery is successful in eliminating all visible cancer.
High sugar consumption among children relates to poor family functioning, The quality of general family functioning is a major determinant of healthy dietary habits, according to new research. A British study found that a mother's perception of effective general family functioning has a significant effect on limiting the intake of sugary foods and drinks by their three and four year old children. In contrast, less effective family functioning leads to high frequency intake of sugary foods and drinks by three and four year old children in the family.

Maltreated children's brains show 'encouraging' ability to regulate emotions There's a common assumption that children subjected to abuse or trauma will have problematic emotions across the board -- muted responses to positive situations and extreme reactions to negative ones. But a new study's findings suggest that maltreated children are perhaps more resilient and adaptable than previously thought. Given the right strategies, abused children have a surprising ability to regulate their emotions.

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