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Saturday, September 19, 2015

, Alzheimer's Research: Major breakthrough in understanding Alzheimer's disease ♦ Tracing the triggers of late-onset Alzheimer's ♦ Patterns in the progression towards Alzheimer's disease

Some evidence of link between stress, Alzheimer's disease discovered More evidence of a link between the brain's stress response and a protein related to Alzheimer's disease has been uncovered by a team of researchers. The research, conducted on a mouse model and in human cells, found that a stress-coping hormone released by the brain boosts the production of protein fragments.
Major breakthrough in understanding Alzheimer's disease Researchers believe that periodic clearance of a specific protein across the blood brain barrier could hold tremendous potential for new therapies.
Identifying typical patterns in the progression towards Alzheimer's disease  How the brain progresses from mild cognitive impairment (MCI) to Alzheimer's-type dementia has been an enigma for the scientific community. However, a recent study has shed light on this progression by showing the typical patterns of the brain's progression to dementia.
Tracing the triggers of late-onset Alzheimer's In a sprawling review of more than 200 articles examining the suggested link between infections of the mouth and Alzheimer's disease (AD), two researchers -- one, an original mapper of the oral microbiome; the other, a scientist who has worked considerably on the connection between oral infection and AD -- have surveyed the current body of research, and point to potential oral microbial culprits.

Down syndrome research untangles therapeutic possibilities for Alzheimer's More than five million Americans are living with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Of them, 400,000 also have Down syndrome. Both groups have similar looking brains with higher levels of the protein beta amyloid. In fact, patients with Down syndrome develop the abnormal protein at twice the rate. Results of a pilot study confirms the pathogenic role of beta amyloid in dementia as seen in both AD and Down syndrome.

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