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Friday, September 4, 2015

Cancer Research:Aspirin could hold key to supercharged cancer immunotherapy ♦ Variations in cell programs control cancer ♦Low-risk prostate cancer not likely to succumb to the disease

Some with low-risk prostate cancer not likely to succumb to the disease Men with relatively unaggressive prostate tumors and whose disease is carefully monitored by urologists are unlikely to develop metastatic prostate cancer or die of their cancers, according to results of a study that analyzed survival statistics up to 15 years.
Researchers develop a likely new combo treatment for the deadliest form of brain cancer Scientists have developed a potentially promising new combination therapy for glioblastoma, the deadliest form of brain cancer. Glioblastoma, also known as grade IV glioma, is the most aggressive primary brain tumor in humans. Approximately 23,000 people in the U.S. are diagnosed with glioblastoma (GBM) every year.
Targeting newly discovered pathway sensitizes tumors to radiation and chemotherapy In some patients, aggressive cancers can become resistant to chemotherapy and radiation treatments. In a new paper, researchers identified a pathway that causes the resistance and a new therapeutic drug that targets this pathway
Aspirin could hold key to supercharged cancer immunotherapy Giving cancer patients aspirin at the same time as immunotherapy could dramatically boost the effectiveness of the treatment, according to new research. Aspirin is part of a group of molecules called COX inhibitors, which stop the production of PGE2 and help reawaken the immune system. Combining immunotherapy with aspirin or other COX inhibitors substantially slowed bowel and melanoma skin cancer growth in mice, compared to immunotherapy alone, authors say.
Variations in cell programs control cancer and normal stem cells In the breast, cancer stem cells and normal stem cells can arise from different cell types and tap into distinct yet related stem cell programs, according to researchers. The differences between these stem cell programs may be significant enough to be exploited by future therapeutics.

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