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Friday, September 4, 2015

Immune System Research: How a single molecule turns one immune cell into another ♦ Susceptibility to allergies can be reduced ♦ Immune cells in the skin remember

Immune cells in the skin remember, defend against parasite For the first time, researchers have found resident T cells in a tissue in response to a parasite infection. The finding could help inform efforts to develop an effective vaccine for leishmaniasis, as well as other diseases such as tuberculosis and leprosy.
How a single molecule turns one immune cell into another All it takes is one molecule to reprogram an antibody-producing B cell into a scavenging macrophage. This transformation is possible, new evidence shows, because the molecule (C/EBPa, a transcription factor) 'short-circuits' the cells so that they re-express genes reserved for embryonic development.
Cirrhosis, antibodies increase risk of poor outcome for autoimmune hepatitis patients New research reports that cirrhosis at first diagnosis and antibodies for the soluble liver antigen/liver pancreas antigen (SLA/LP) are major risk factors for poor short- and long-term outcome in patients with autoimmune hepatitis. Scientists also found that patients diagnosed in childhood were at higher risk of relapse, need of a liver transplant, and reduced life expectancy

Susceptibility to allergies can be reduced Susceptibility to allergies reduced by increased production of regulatory T cells, researchers report, adding that these new findings could lead to preventive treatments being developed for high risk patients in the future.

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