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Wednesday, April 22, 2015

Health Research: Genetic variance explains poor response asthma medications ♦ mmune cells help 'good bacteria' triumph over 'bad bacteria' ♦ Type 2 diabetes: Understanding regulation of sugar levels

Battle in the gut: Immune cells help 'good bacteria' triumph over 'bad bacteria' The body's immune system may be the keeper of a healthy gut microbiota, report scientists. They found that a binding protein on white blood cells could affect whether or not mice produced a balanced gut microbiota. Without the protein, harmful bacteria were more easily able to infect. Why this happens is unclear, but it may be that the immune system has a way to sense the presence of invading intestinal bacteria.
Type 2 diabetes: Understanding regulation of sugar levels for better treatment A new mechanism that controls glucagon secretion in humans has been described by researchers, making it possible to elucidate this phenomenon and suggesting a modification of this new type of treatment.
How to approach your boss about a treadmill desk People walking on treadmill desks perform cognitive tasks nearly as well as those at sitting desks, new research finds. An exercise science professor and a neuroscientist report their findings after putting treadmill desks to the test. The duo compared the cognitive performance of healthy adults sitting at a desk to those using treadmill desks while carrying out the same tasks
Genetic variance explains poor response to common asthma medications  Researchers have identified a biological basis for asthmatic children who do not respond well to corticosteroid treatment -- currently the most effective treatment for chronic asthma and acute asthma attack. The study also identifies a genetic pathway that could open the possibility of new therapies for difficult-to-treat patients

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