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Friday, July 17, 2015

Brain Research: Magnetic nanoparticles could be key to effective immunotherapy ♦ New antibody treats traumatic brain injury ♦ New approach to spinal cord, brain injury research

New antibody treats traumatic brain injury (TBI) and prevents long-term neurodegeneration New research provides the first direct evidence linking traumatic brain injury to Alzheimer's disease and chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) -- and offers the potential for early intervention TBI can result from repetitive contact sport injuries or from exposure to military blasts, and is one of the most significant risk factors for both Alzheimer's disease and CTE
New evidence linking brain mutation to autism, epilepsy and other neuro disorders The extent a mutation associated with autism and epilepsy plays in impairing a biochemical process in the brain has been revealed by researchers. The study  could provide a new target for treating neurological disorders
Gene associated with thinking skills Researchers have identified a gene that underlies healthy information processing -- a first step on a complicated road to understand cognitive aging and age-related diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease.
New approach to spinal cord, brain injury research Many an injury will heal, but the damaged spinal cord is notoriously recalcitrant. There's new hope on the horizon, though. Researchers has reported an innate repair mechanism in central nervous system axons that might be harnessed to regenerate nerves after brain or spinal cord injuries.
Magnetic nanoparticles could be key to effective immunotherapy In recent years, researchers have hotly pursued immunotherapy, a promising form of treatment that relies on harnessing and training the body's own immune system to better fight cancer and infection. Now, results of a new study suggests that a device composed of a magnetic column paired with custom-made magnetic nanoparticles may hold a key to bringing immunotherapy into widespread and successful clinical use.

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