Google+ Badge

Tuesday, July 21, 2015

Cancer Research:'Pill on a string' could help spot early signs of cancer ♦ Immune system linked with cancer survival rates ♦ Precision medicine for most common type of lymphoma

Life-saving breast cancer drugs going untaken in Appalachia Nearly one-third of breast cancer survivors in Appalachia are not taking the critical, potentially life-saving follow-up treatment -- despite having insurance that would pay for
'Pill on a string' could help spot early signs of cancer of the gullet A 'pill on a string' could help doctors detect esophageal cancer -- cancer of the gullet -- at an early stage, helping them overcome the problem of wide variation between biopsies.
Gene expression, immune system linked with cancer survival rates Physicians have long sought a way to accurately predict cancer patients' survival outcomes by looking at biological details of the specific cancers they have. But despite concerted efforts, no such clinical crystal ball exists for the majority of cancers. Now researchers have compiled a database that integrates gene expression patterns of 39 types of cancer from nearly 18,000 patients with data about how long those patients lived.
T-cell receptor therapy achieves encouraging clinical responses in multiple myeloma Results from a clinical trial investigating a new T cell receptor therapy that uses a person's own immune system to recognize and destroy cancer cells demonstrated a clinical response in 80 percent of multiple myeloma patients with advanced disease after undergoing autologous stem cell transplants.

Study shows promise of precision medicine for most common type of lymphoma Patients with a specific molecular sub type of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma are more likely to respond to the drug ibrutinib (Imbruvica) than patients with another molecular subtype of the disease.

No comments:

Post a Comment