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Friday, July 24, 2015

Health Research: New smart drug targets, reduces site-specific inflammation ♦ E-cigarettes may be as addictive as traditional ones ♦ Research with dolphins provides hope for prevention of diabetes in humans

Can butter help prevent diabetes? By comparing 55 fatty acids in blood levels of dolphins and their diets, scientists have discovered a specific dietary saturated fat, called heptadecanoic acid, that may help alleviate what's known as 'prediabetes' in humans. This new study supports a growing body of nutritional science showing that perhaps not all dietary saturated fats are bad, and -- in fact -- that some may be good.
The uniqueness of a new novel anti-inflammatory molecule can be found in a singular property. When injected, it is as a non-active drug. However, a localized site with excessive inflammation will activate it. Most other anti-inflammatory agents effectively inhibit inflammatory processes, though in a non-specific manner and in areas that include sites of necessary normal inflammatory homeostasis.
Is it possible that too much iron in infant formula may potentially increase risk for neurodegenerative diseases like Parkinson's in adulthood -- and are teeth the window into the past that can help us tell?
A study of the West Nile virus risk associated with 'dry' water-detention basins in Central Illinois took an unexpected turn when land managers started mowing the basins. The mowing of wetland plants in basins that failed to drain properly led to a boom in populations of Culex pipiens mosquitoes, which can carry and transmit the deadly virus, researchers report.
Electronic cigarettes or 'e-cigs' have been touted as a tool smokers can use to wean themselves off of traditional cigarettes, which many believe are more harmful than their 'e' counterparts. But because e-cig liquid also contains nicotine and emits carcinogens, is that perception really true? One team now reports that much of the nicotine in e-cigarettes is the addictive form of the compound.

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