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Saturday, May 30, 2015

Brain research: Magnetic milli robots offer hope for less-invasive surgery ♦ Scientists retrieve lost memories using Light ♦ Brain signals contain the code for your next move


Brain signals contain the code for your next move Is it possible to tap into the signalling in the brain to figure out what you will choose to do next? Researchers can now say yes, and have published a description of how this happens.
Study identifies brain regions activated when pain intensity doesn't match expectation Picture yourself in a medical office, anxiously awaiting your annual flu shot. The nurse casually states, "This won't hurt a bit." But when the needle pierces your skin it hurts, and it hurts a lot. Your expectations have been violated, and not in a good way
Scientists retrieve lost memories using Light Researchers have found that memories that have been 'lost' as a result of amnesia can be recalled by activating brain cells with light. They reactivated memories that could not otherwise be retrieved, using a technology known as optogenetics
How sleep helps us learn and memorize Sleep is important for long lasting memories, particularly during this exam season. New research suggests that sleeping triggers the synapses in our brain to both strengthen and weaken, which prompts the forgetting, strengthening or modification of our memories in a process known as long-term potentiation.
Medical, magnetic milli robots offer hope for less-invasive surgeries Seeking to advance minimally invasive medical treatments, researchers have proposed using tiny robots, driven by magnetic potential energy from magnetic resonance imaging scanners. The potential technology could be used to treat hydrocephalus and other conditions, allowing surgeons to avoid current treatments that require cutting through the skull to implant pressure-relieving shunts.




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