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Saturday, May 30, 2015

Cancer Research:Breast cancer could be stopped in its tracks ♦ Study could explain why ovarian cancer treatments fail ♦ Proteins identified to target in osteosarcoma treatment

Breast cancer could be stopped in its tracks’ by new technique Certain breast cancers spread to the bones using an enzyme that drills “seed holes” for planting new tumours. The discovery could lead to treatments aimed at preventing secondary breast cancers in patients with non-hormone sensitive disease. The enzyme lysyl oxidase (Lox) is released from the primary tumour in the breast. Scientists found that it produces holes
Study could explain why ovarian cancer treatments fail Ovarian cancer cells can lock into survival mode and avoid being destroyed by chemotherapy. The research used whole genome sequencing to analyse tumor DNA samples from 91 patients with high-grade serous ovarian cancer
Researchers identify origin of chromosomal oddity in some cancer cells Surveys of the genomic terrain of cancer have turned up a curious phenomenon in some tumor cells: a massive rearrangement of DNA in one or a few chromosomes, thought to be produced during a single cell cycle. Scientists demonstrate how this sudden, isolated shuffling of genetic material can occur.
Scientists identify key to preventing secondary cancers Breast cancer is a disease that commonly spreads to other areas of the body; the most common site for the disease to spread is the bone. Leading scientists have identified a possible key to preventing secondary cancers in breast cancer patients, after discovering an enzyme that enhances the spread of the disease. They also report that an existing class of drugs for osteoporosis could stop the spread of the disease

Potential proteins identified to target in osteosarcoma treatment The genes and pathways that, when altered, can cause osteosarcoma have been identified by researchers using new models. The information could be used to better target treatments for the often-deadly type of cancer

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