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Saturday, May 30, 2015

Aging Research: Imaging test may identify biomarker of Alzheimer's disease ♦ Changing activity in the aging brain ♦ Tablets can help elderly cross the 'digital divide'

Researchers discover surprisingly wide variation across species in genetic systems that influence aging A new study focusing on insulin signaling uncovered surprising genetic diversity across reptiles, birds and mammals. Scientists previously assumed the process remained much the same throughout the animal kingdom, but the new research shows that the genetic pathways in reptiles evolved to include protein forms not observed in mammals.
Tablets can help elderly cross the 'digital divide' One way to help the elderly cross what's known as the 'digital divide' is the use of tablets, those smaller, lighter, easy-to-use computers that seem to be taking the place of laptops
Imaging test may identify biomarker of Alzheimer's disease Degeneration of the white matter of the brain may be an early marker of specific types of Alzheimer's disease (AD), including early-onset AD.
Changing activity in the aging brain Normal aging affects our ability to carry out complex cognitive tasks. But exactly how our brain functions change during this process is largely unknown. Now, researchers have demonstrated that aging changes the activity patterns in specific brain regions involved in memory and cognition.
Molecules involved in Alzheimer's have a role in weakening of connections between neurons Molecules that are strongly associated with Alzheimer's disease are important players in a process called long-term depression (LTD), researchers have discovered. LTD is a process through which the strength of synapses, the connections between neurons, is selectively reduced. This new research suggests improperly regulated LTD could cause the degeneration of the connections between neurons that is a core feature of Alzheimer's and other neurodegenerative diseases.

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