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Tuesday, May 26, 2015

Cancer Research: Nanotherapy effective in mice with multiple myelom ♦ Researchers unveil new gene subgroup in prostate canc ♦ Removing mutant p53 significantly regresses tumors



Nanotherapy effective in mice with multiple myeloma A nanoparticle-based therapy is effective in treating mice with multiple myeloma, a cancer of immune cells in the bone marrow. Targeted specifically to the malignant cells, these nanoparticles protect their therapeutic cargo from degradation in the bloodstream and greatly enhance drug delivery into the cancer cells.
36-percent increase in pediatric patients treated with proton therapy, new survey shows survey indicates a steady increase in the number of pediatric patients who are being treated with proton radiation therapy for cancerous and noncancerous tumors. Based on a survey of all proton therapy centers in the U.S, the number of pediatric patients treated with proton therapy grew to 722 in 2013
Ovarian cancer-specific markers set the stage for early diagnosis, personalized treatments Six mRNA isoforms (bits of genetic material) produced by ovarian cancer cells but not normal cells have been identified by scientists, opening up the possibility that they could be used to diagnose early-stage ovarian cancer
Researchers unveil new gene subgroup in prostate cancer Prostate cancer researchers have drawn a molecular portrait that provides the first complete picture of localized, multifocal disease within the prostate and also unveils a new gene subgroup driving it.
Removing mutant p53 significantly regresses tumors, improves cancer survival For two decades cancer researchers have looked unsuccessfully for ways to develop compounds to restore the function of mutant p53 proteins. Now a team of researchers has discovered that eliminating the abnormally stabilized mutant p53 protein in cancer in vivo has positive therapeutic effects, showing that tumors regress significantly and survival increases.

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