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Thursday, May 21, 2015

Health Research:High risk of sleep apnea in young veterans with PTSD ♦ Stem cells may improve bone healing in diabetics ♦ Printing 3D graphene structures for tissue engineering

Human stem cells may improve bone healing in diabetics Adding stem cells from human bone marrow to a broken diabetic bone enhances the repair process, increasing the strength of the newly formed bone. The work could potentially lead to more effective treatments for broken bones.
High risk of sleep apnea in young veterans with PTSD The probability of having a high risk of obstructive sleep apnea increased with increasing severity of PTSD, a new study of young US veterans shows. The study involved 195 Iraq and Afghanistan veterans who visited a Veterans' Affairs outpatient PTSD clinic for evaluation. Results show that 69.2 % had a high risk for sleep apnea, and this risk increased with PTSD symptom
How will astronauts keep in shape for extended periods? Run far or run fast? That is one of the questions NASA is trying to answer with one of its latest studies -- and the answers may help keep us in shape on Earth, as well as in space. Even with regular exercise, astronauts who spend an extended period of time in space experience muscle weakening, bone loss, and decreased cardiovascular conditioning.
Printing 3D graphene structures for tissue engineering . With its high electrical conductivity, ability to store energy, and ultra-strong and lightweight structure, graphene has potential for many applications in medicine. Now a new ink formulation has been created that allows for the 3-D printing of large, robust graphene structures with unique mechanical and biological properties
Research boosts evidence for a new class of treatments to help preserve vision A substantial percentage of patients with diabetic macular edema do not have high levels of the VEGF protein in the fluid inside their eyes but do have high levels of a protein called PKal (plasma kallikrein) and associated molecules that are key players in an inflammatory molecular pathway involved in the disease, research concludes. This finding could lead to a new class of treatments to help preserve vision.

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