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Thursday, May 28, 2015

Children's Health:Better fine motor skills with delayed cord clamping ♦ Communication made easier for children with cerebral palsy ♦ 'Do' is better than 'don't' when it comes to eating better

Infusions of donor bone marrow cells help children with inherited skin blistering Promising results from a trial of a new stem-cell based therapy for a rare and debilitating skin condition suggest that the therapy, involving infusions of stem cells, provide pain relief and to reduce the severity of this skin condition for which no cure currently exists.
Better fine motor skills with delayed cord clamping The importance of the umbilical cord for both the fetus and for newborn infants was demonstrated by researchers several years ago, in a study that received great international acclaim. In a follow-up study, the researchers have now been able to show an association between delayed cord clamping (DCC) and children's fine motor skills at the age of four years, especially in boys.
Communication made easier for children with cerebral palsy A European initiative has developed a new brain-computer interface system to enhance communication skills of people with cerebral palsy from childhood, improving the relationship with their environment and the expression of emotions.
'Do' is better than 'don't' when it comes to eating better Tell your child or spouse what they can eat and not what they can't, experts advise. Telling your child to eat an apple so they stay healthy will work better than telling them not to eat the cookie because it will make them fat. A new discovery shows that 'Don't' messages don't work for most of us.
Strength-based parenting improves children's resilience and stress levels Children are more likely to use their strengths to effectively cope with minor stress in their life if they have parents who adopt a strength-based approach to parenting. Strength-based parenting is an approach where parents deliberately identify and cultivate positive states, processes and qualities in their children.

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