Google+ Badge

Wednesday, July 15, 2015

Autism Research: Brain study reveals insights into genetic basis of autism ♦ Can autism be measured in a sniff? ♦ Cesarean section delivery, autism spectrum disorder

Autistic children improved reading, brain activity after 10-week reading intervention Ten weeks of intensive reading intervention for children with autism spectrum disorder was enough to strengthen the activity of loosely connected areas of their brains that work together to comprehend reading, researchers have found
Study examines Cesarean section delivery, autism spectrum disorder The initial results of a study suggested that children born by Cesarean section were 21 percent more likely to be diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder but that association did not hold up in further analysis of sibling pairs, implying the initial association was not causal and was more likely due to unknown genetic or environmental factors.
Can autism be measured in a sniff? Imagine the way you might smell a rose. You'd take a nice big sniff to breathe in the sweet but subtle floral scent. Upon walking into a public restroom, you'd likely do just the opposite -- abruptly limiting the flow of air through your nose. Now, researchers have found that people with autism spectrum disorder don't make this natural adjustment like other people do.
Brain study reveals insights into genetic basis of autism A link between autism and genetic changes in some segments of DNA that are responsible for switching on genes in the brain has been uncovered by researchers. The finding is the result of a world-first study of the human brain that identified more than 100 of these DNA segments, known as enhancers, which are thought to play a vital role in normal development by controlling gene activity in the brain.
Lower-intensity treatment as effective as high-intensity for children with high-functioning autism, Researchers have found that reducing the intensity of their comprehensive summer treatment yielded improvements for high-functioning children with autism spectrum disorder that were comparable to the original high-intensity program.

No comments:

Post a Comment