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Thursday, July 16, 2015

Brain Research: Memory-loss man case 'like nothing we have ever seen before' ♦ Insight into sudden unexpected death in epilepsy ♦ Alzheimer's may affect the brain differently in African-Americans

A new wrinkle: Geometry of brain's outer surface correlates with genetic heritage The three-dimensional shape of the cerebral cortex -- the wrinkled outer layer of the brain controlling many functions of thinking and sensation -- strongly correlates with ancestral background, . The study opens the door to more precise studies of brain anatomy going forward and could eventually lead to more personalized medicine..
Scientists ‘watch’ rats string memories together By using electrode implants to track nerve cells firing in the brains of rats as they plan where to go next, scientists say they have learned that the mammalian brain likely reconstructs memories in a way more like jumping across stepping stones than walking across a bridge. The research sheds light on what memories are and how they form.
Memory-loss man case 'like nothing we have ever seen before' A psychologist has described a unique case, new to science. A 38-year-old fit and healthy man suffered memory loss after a local anesthetic and root-canal treatment at his dentist. There is no evidence that the treatment at the dentist can be blamed for his condition. He is fully aware of his identity and his personality did not change -- but every day the man thinks it is the day of his dental appointment.
Researchers stimulate human amygdala to gain key insight into sudden unexpected death in epilepsy Researchers have identified areas of the human brain in which breathing is controlled and, in some cases, impaired. Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy is becoming increasingly recognized as a very real and devastating problem in which impaired breathing is thought to play a critical role. Researchers believe breathing may be impaired during and after seizures, without the patient's knowledge.

Alzheimer's may affect the brain differently in African-Americans than European-Americans Alzheimer’s disease may cause different changes in the brain, or pathologies, in African-Americans than in white Americans of European descent.

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