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Thursday, May 7, 2015

Brain Research:Brain chemical may offer new clues in treating chronic pain ♦ Traumatic brain injury linked to increased road rage ♦ How noise changes the way the brain gets information

Traumatic brain injury linked to increased road rage Ontario adult drivers who say they have experienced at least one traumatic brain injury in their lifetime also report significantly higher incidents of serious road-related driving aggression, said a new study. Serious driver aggression includes: making threats to hurt a fellow driver, passenger or vehicle. These individuals also reported significantly higher odds of being involved in a motor vehicle collision that resulted in hurting themselves, their passenger or their vehicle.
How noise changes the way the brain gets information In a study on mice, cells that relay information from the ear to the brain changed their behavior and structure in response to the noise level in the environment. Researchers think the adaptations could aid hearing in different conditions.
Say what? How the brain separates our ability to talk and write The human ability to write evolved from our ability to speak. Writing and talking are now such independent systems in the brain that someone who can't write a grammatically correct sentence may be able say it aloud flawlessly
Brain chemical may offer new clues in treating chronic pain A chemical in the brain typically associated with cognition, movement and reward-motivation behavior -- among others -- may also play a role in promoting chronic pain. The chemical, dopamine, sets the stage for many important brain functions, but the mechanisms that cause it to contribute to chronic pain are less well understood

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