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Saturday, May 9, 2015

Health News: FDA, long list of problems at Blue Bell plants ♦ ’Super-cool' way to deliver drugs ♦ Natural killer cell l maturation discovered

FDA  inspectors report long list of problems at Blue Bell plants Inspection teams from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration reported numerous problems after recent visits to three production facilities owned and operated by Blue Bell Creameries The company announced that it was recalling all products (ice cream, frozen yogurt, sherbet and frozen desserts) manufactured at all of its plants after receiving positive Listeria...
New form of DNA modification may carry inheritable information The surprising discovery and function of a new DNA modification in insects, worms, and algae has been described in a new article
’Super-cool' way to deliver drugs Some substances, when they undergo a process called 'rapid-freezing' or 'supercooling,' remain in liquid form -- even at below-freezing temperatures. A new study is the first to break down the rules governing the complex process of crystallization through rapid-cooling. Its findings may revolutionize the delivery of drugs in the human body, providing a way to 'freeze' the drugs at an optimal time and location in the body.
Negative regulator of natural killer cell maturation discovered A new study has identified a regulatory pathway in natural killer cells that inhibits their maturation and homing behavior. Natural killer cells are one of the body's first lines of defense against viruses and cancer. The findings could lead to new strategies for boosting natural-killer cell activity against cancer and viral infections, scientists say.
People with diabetes who enroll in a health plan tailored to their medical condition are more likely to stick to their medication and actively take charge of their own health care, research into the effectiveness of the Diabetes Health Plan finds.


Posted: 07 May 2015 06:31 PM PDT
Researchers have developed artificial membranes with programmable features, enabling studies of cell communication and the molecular basis of disease. The new study demonstrates how researchers can examine the interactions of cell surfaces with other biological molecules, with far ranging applications in medicine, biochemistry and biophysics.
Posted: 07 May 2015 01:54 PM PDT
The difference between life and death in the operating room, on the battlefield or during a police shootout often comes down to the ability to adapt to the unexpected. Sleep deprivation may make it difficult to do so, according to a study that for the first time created a laboratory experiment that simulates how sleep loss affects critical aspects of decision making in high-stakes, real-world situations
Posted: 07 May 2015 01:54 PM PDT
Researchers are reporting a case study in which viable Ebola virus was present in the eye’s aqueous humor — the clear fluid in the front of the eye, between the lens and the cornea — 10 weeks after the virus was no longer detectable in the patient’s blood.
Posted: 07 May 2015 12:41 PM PDT
The popularity of bamboo landscaping could increase the spread of hantavirus, researchers say, with the plant's prolific seed production creating a population boom among seed-eating deer mice that carry the disease.
Posted: 07 May 2015 12:41 PM PDT
The United States makes up less than five percent of the world's population but consumes 80 percent of the global opioid supply and approximately 99 percent of all hydrocodone -- the most commonly prescribed opioid in the world.
Posted: 07 May 2015 12:39 PM PDT
By increasing the stiffness of erythrocytes infected by the causal agent of malaria, Viagra favors their elimination from the blood circulation and may therefore reduce transmission of the parasite from humans to mosquitoes. This astonishing discovery could lead to a treatment to reduce the spread of malaria within a population
Posted: 07 May 2015 11:53 AM PDT
In a study of nearly 26,000 beneficiaries of Tricare, the military health system, those taking statin drugs to control their cholesterol were 87 percent more likely to develop diabetes. The research confirms past findings on the link between the widely prescribed drugs and diabetes risk. But it is among the first to show the connection in a relatively healthy group of people. The study included only people who at baseline were free of heart disease, diabetes, and other severe chronic disease.
Posted: 07 May 2015 11:52 AM PDT
A promising new therapeutic approach for hereditary blindness based on a technology termed 'optogenetics' is to introduce light-sensing proteins into these surviving retinal cells, turning them into 'replacement photoreceptors' and thereby restoring vision. However, several factors limit the feasibility of a clinical optogenetic therapy using traditional light-sensitive proteins, as they require unnaturally high and potentially harmful light intensities and employ a foreign signaling mechanism within the target retinal cells.
Posted: 07 May 2015 11:51 AM PDT
Chagas disease, caused by the Trypanosoma cruzi parasite and transmitted by insects in Latin America is among the most common tropical diseases, and so far without effective vaccine. A new study now shows that a candidate vaccine can induce long-lasting immunity against the parasite in mice
Posted: 07 May 2015 11:51 AM PDT
The Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx) project consortia has now published its results from their first pilot study contributing to a better understanding of genomic variation and give us new clues about disease susceptibility
Posted: 07 May 2015 10:59 AM PDT
Arginine, a common amino acid found naturally in foods, breaks down dental plaque, which could help millions of people avoid cavities and gum disease, researchers have discovered.
Posted: 07 May 2015 10:59 AM PDT
Medications have long been used to treat pain caused by injury or chronic conditions. Unfortunately, most are short-term fixes or cause side effects that limit their use. Researchers have discovered a new compound that offers longer lasting painkilling effects, and shows promise as an alternative to current anesthetics
Posted: 07 May 2015 09:29 AM PDT
Patients undergoing colorectal operations who participated in an enhanced recovery program left the hospital sooner and had significantly lower hospital costs than patients who had the traditional approach to their care, according to a new study, which also found further postoperative improvements after adding an infection prevention protocol
Posted: 07 May 2015 09:29 AM PDT
In patients with primary snoring or mild OSA, oropharyngeal, or mouth and tongue, exercises significantly reduced the frequency of snoring by 36 percent and total power of snoring by 59 percent, a study concludes.
Posted: 07 May 2015 08:42 AM PDT
Compliance with post-treatment surveillance, income level and the travel distance for follow-up care had effects on survival in patients with head and neck squamous cell cancer, according to a report
Posted: 07 May 2015 08:40 AM PDT
Spending on postacute care in skilled nursing facilities (SNFs) provides a key signal of inefficiency in the health care system, leading to higher spending and lower patient survival, experts say in a new report.
Posted: 07 May 2015 06:31 AM PDT
Obesity and depression – not only lack of sleep – are underlying causes for regular drowsiness, according to researchers. They say the findings could lead to more personalized sleep medicine for those with excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS
Posted: 07 May 2015 06:31 AM PDT
A green dye that sticks to bone grafts becomes antimicrobial with the flick of a light switch and could help reduce the risk of infections during bone-reconstruction surgeries, scientists report. In theory, they explain, the dye could be added to the currently used protocols for sterilizing the bone prior to use in surgery.
Posted: 07 May 2015 05:24 AM PDT
A new device for performing skin biopsies has been created by scientists. With this new tool a skin biopsy can be performed with fewer instruments and the length of the procedure is shortened from thirty minutes to less than five. Neither local anesthesia nor specialized personnel are required. As a result, faster diagnosis of pathologies such as skin cancer is possible
Posted: 07 May 2015 05:24 AM PDT
Tiny, complex scaffolds that mimic the intricate network of collagen fibers that form the human eardrum have been created by an international team of researchers. It is hoped the scaffolds can be used to replace eardrums when they become severely damaged, reducing the need for patients to have their own tissue used in reconstruction surgery.
Posted: 07 May 2015 05:19 AM PDT
Melanoma is aggressive and life-threatening. If it is not detected early, the prospects of recovery drop. Screening is complicated, though. Together with several project partners, researchers have developed an assistance system that helps dermatologists with diagnosis.
Posted: 08 May 2015 11:03 AM PDT
Scientists have been manipulating genes for a while. Now researchers have found a way to control the process with higher precision, by using light.
Posted: 08 May 2015 08:05 AM PDT
New research shows how a single growth factor receptor protein programs the entire genome. The study provides evidence that it all begins with a single "master" growth factor receptor that regulates the entire genome.
Posted: 08 May 2015 07:58 AM PDT
Countless research and self-help books claim that having more sex will lead to increased happiness, based on the common finding that those having more sex are also happier. Scientists now report that simply having more sex did not make couples happier, in part because the increased frequency led to a decline in wanting for and enjoyment of sex.
Posted: 08 May 2015 06:16 AM PDT
Non-suicidal self-injury -- that is, purposefully hurting oneself without conscious suicidal intent -- is relatively common among Iraq and Afghanistan veterans, and it is a strong risk factor for suicidal behavior, according to research.
Posted: 08 May 2015 06:14 AM PDT
A new locator feature on a search and rescue tool can pinpoint the location of a victim to within about five feet – saving rescuers time and increasing chances for locating survivors.
Posted: 08 May 2015 05:26 AM PDT
Scientists have come a step closer to understanding why people exposed to household air pollution (HAP) are at higher risk of lung infections such as pneumonia and tuberculosis. Three billion people worldwide are exposed to HAP from the fuels they burn to cook, light and heat with at home. Frequently, charcoal, wood and food waste are burned and generate high concentrations of smoke particles. This exposure is associated with increased risk of pneumonia, particularly in low and middle income countries where bacterial pneumonia is the biggest cause of infant mortality. This risk is well known, but the reasons are not.
Posted: 08 May 2015 05:26 AM PDT
A revolutionary ‘smart’ cane enabling the visually impaired to instantly identify friends and family could be available soon, thanks to students at a British university. The ‘XploR’ mobility cane uses smartphone technology to recognize familiar faces from up to 10 metres away. The cane also features GPS functionality to aid navigation.
Posted: 08 May 2015 05:26 AM PDT
The ability that some people have to use echoes to determine the position of an otherwise silent object, in a similar way to bats and dolphins, requires good high-pitch hearing in both ears, according to new research. This builds on recent research that demonstrated conclusively that some sighted and blind people could use echoes in this way. What wasn't clear until now was how important high-frequency hearing in both ears is.
Posted: 08 May 2015 05:23 AM PDT
People with PTSD may also be at risk for accelerated aging or premature senescence, research suggests. The researchers noted that there has not been another study that links PTSD, a psychological disorder with no established genetic basis, to a basic biological process such as aging.
Posted: 07 May 2015 06:29 PM PDT
Scientists have identified a protein on the surface of human red blood cells that serves as an essential entry point for invasion by the malaria parasite. This discovery opens up a promising new avenue for the development of therapies to treat and prevent malaria
Posted: 07 May 2015 11:50 AM PDT
Newly evolved genes can rapidly assume control over fundamental functions during early embryonic development. The findings suggest that evolutionary changes to the genetics of fundamental biological processes occur more frequently than previously thought.


































FDA  inspectors report long list of problems at Blue Bell plants Inspection teams from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration reported numerous problems after recent visits to three production facilities owned and operated by Blue Bell Creameries The company announced that it was recalling all products (ice cream, frozen yogurt, sherbet and frozen desserts) manufactured at all of its plants after receiving positive Listeria...
New form of DNA modification may carry inheritable information The surprising discovery and function of a new DNA modification in insects, worms, and algae has been described in a new article
’Super-cool' way to deliver drugs Some substances, when they undergo a process called 'rapid-freezing' or 'supercooling,' remain in liquid form -- even at below-freezing temperatures. A new study is the first to break down the rules governing the complex process of crystallization through rapid-cooling. Its findings may revolutionize the delivery of drugs in the human body, providing a way to 'freeze' the drugs at an optimal time and location in the body.
Negative regulator of natural killer cell maturation discovered A new study has identified a regulatory pathway in natural killer cells that inhibits their maturation and homing behavior. Natural killer cells are one of the body's first lines of defense against viruses and cancer. The findings could lead to new strategies for boosting natural-killer cell activity against cancer and viral infections, scientists say.
People with diabetes who enroll in a health plan tailored to their medical condition are more likely to stick to their medication and actively take charge of their own health care, research into the effectiveness of the Diabetes Health Plan finds.



Posted: 07 May 2015 06:31 PM PDT
Researchers have developed artificial membranes with programmable features, enabling studies of cell communication and the molecular basis of disease. The new study demonstrates how researchers can examine the interactions of cell surfaces with other biological molecules, with far ranging applications in medicine, biochemistry and biophysics.
Posted: 07 May 2015 01:54 PM PDT
The difference between life and death in the operating room, on the battlefield or during a police shootout often comes down to the ability to adapt to the unexpected. Sleep deprivation may make it difficult to do so, according to a study that for the first time created a laboratory experiment that simulates how sleep loss affects critical aspects of decision making in high-stakes, real-world situations
Posted: 07 May 2015 01:54 PM PDT
Researchers are reporting a case study in which viable Ebola virus was present in the eye’s aqueous humor — the clear fluid in the front of the eye, between the lens and the cornea — 10 weeks after the virus was no longer detectable in the patient’s blood.
Posted: 07 May 2015 12:41 PM PDT
The popularity of bamboo landscaping could increase the spread of hantavirus, researchers say, with the plant's prolific seed production creating a population boom among seed-eating deer mice that carry the disease.
Posted: 07 May 2015 12:41 PM PDT
The United States makes up less than five percent of the world's population but consumes 80 percent of the global opioid supply and approximately 99 percent of all hydrocodone -- the most commonly prescribed opioid in the world.
Posted: 07 May 2015 12:39 PM PDT
By increasing the stiffness of erythrocytes infected by the causal agent of malaria, Viagra favors their elimination from the blood circulation and may therefore reduce transmission of the parasite from humans to mosquitoes. This astonishing discovery could lead to a treatment to reduce the spread of malaria within a population
Posted: 07 May 2015 11:53 AM PDT
In a study of nearly 26,000 beneficiaries of Tricare, the military health system, those taking statin drugs to control their cholesterol were 87 percent more likely to develop diabetes. The research confirms past findings on the link between the widely prescribed drugs and diabetes risk. But it is among the first to show the connection in a relatively healthy group of people. The study included only people who at baseline were free of heart disease, diabetes, and other severe chronic disease.
Posted: 07 May 2015 11:52 AM PDT
A promising new therapeutic approach for hereditary blindness based on a technology termed 'optogenetics' is to introduce light-sensing proteins into these surviving retinal cells, turning them into 'replacement photoreceptors' and thereby restoring vision. However, several factors limit the feasibility of a clinical optogenetic therapy using traditional light-sensitive proteins, as they require unnaturally high and potentially harmful light intensities and employ a foreign signaling mechanism within the target retinal cells.
Posted: 07 May 2015 11:51 AM PDT
Chagas disease, caused by the Trypanosoma cruzi parasite and transmitted by insects in Latin America is among the most common tropical diseases, and so far without effective vaccine. A new study now shows that a candidate vaccine can induce long-lasting immunity against the parasite in mice
Posted: 07 May 2015 11:51 AM PDT
The Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx) project consortia has now published its results from their first pilot study contributing to a better understanding of genomic variation and give us new clues about disease susceptibility
Posted: 07 May 2015 10:59 AM PDT
Arginine, a common amino acid found naturally in foods, breaks down dental plaque, which could help millions of people avoid cavities and gum disease, researchers have discovered.
Posted: 07 May 2015 10:59 AM PDT
Medications have long been used to treat pain caused by injury or chronic conditions. Unfortunately, most are short-term fixes or cause side effects that limit their use. Researchers have discovered a new compound that offers longer lasting painkilling effects, and shows promise as an alternative to current anesthetics
Posted: 07 May 2015 09:29 AM PDT
Patients undergoing colorectal operations who participated in an enhanced recovery program left the hospital sooner and had significantly lower hospital costs than patients who had the traditional approach to their care, according to a new study, which also found further postoperative improvements after adding an infection prevention protocol
Posted: 07 May 2015 09:29 AM PDT
In patients with primary snoring or mild OSA, oropharyngeal, or mouth and tongue, exercises significantly reduced the frequency of snoring by 36 percent and total power of snoring by 59 percent, a study concludes.
Posted: 07 May 2015 08:42 AM PDT
Compliance with post-treatment surveillance, income level and the travel distance for follow-up care had effects on survival in patients with head and neck squamous cell cancer, according to a report
Posted: 07 May 2015 08:40 AM PDT
Spending on postacute care in skilled nursing facilities (SNFs) provides a key signal of inefficiency in the health care system, leading to higher spending and lower patient survival, experts say in a new report.
Posted: 07 May 2015 06:31 AM PDT
Obesity and depression – not only lack of sleep – are underlying causes for regular drowsiness, according to researchers. They say the findings could lead to more personalized sleep medicine for those with excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS
Posted: 07 May 2015 06:31 AM PDT
A green dye that sticks to bone grafts becomes antimicrobial with the flick of a light switch and could help reduce the risk of infections during bone-reconstruction surgeries, scientists report. In theory, they explain, the dye could be added to the currently used protocols for sterilizing the bone prior to use in surgery.
Posted: 07 May 2015 05:24 AM PDT
A new device for performing skin biopsies has been created by scientists. With this new tool a skin biopsy can be performed with fewer instruments and the length of the procedure is shortened from thirty minutes to less than five. Neither local anesthesia nor specialized personnel are required. As a result, faster diagnosis of pathologies such as skin cancer is possible
Posted: 07 May 2015 05:24 AM PDT
Tiny, complex scaffolds that mimic the intricate network of collagen fibers that form the human eardrum have been created by an international team of researchers. It is hoped the scaffolds can be used to replace eardrums when they become severely damaged, reducing the need for patients to have their own tissue used in reconstruction surgery.
Posted: 07 May 2015 05:19 AM PDT
Melanoma is aggressive and life-threatening. If it is not detected early, the prospects of recovery drop. Screening is complicated, though. Together with several project partners, researchers have developed an assistance system that helps dermatologists with diagnosis.
Posted: 08 May 2015 11:03 AM PDT
Scientists have been manipulating genes for a while. Now researchers have found a way to control the process with higher precision, by using light.
Posted: 08 May 2015 08:05 AM PDT
New research shows how a single growth factor receptor protein programs the entire genome. The study provides evidence that it all begins with a single "master" growth factor receptor that regulates the entire genome.
Posted: 08 May 2015 07:58 AM PDT
Countless research and self-help books claim that having more sex will lead to increased happiness, based on the common finding that those having more sex are also happier. Scientists now report that simply having more sex did not make couples happier, in part because the increased frequency led to a decline in wanting for and enjoyment of sex.
Posted: 08 May 2015 06:16 AM PDT
Non-suicidal self-injury -- that is, purposefully hurting oneself without conscious suicidal intent -- is relatively common among Iraq and Afghanistan veterans, and it is a strong risk factor for suicidal behavior, according to research.
Posted: 08 May 2015 06:14 AM PDT
A new locator feature on a search and rescue tool can pinpoint the location of a victim to within about five feet – saving rescuers time and increasing chances for locating survivors.
Posted: 08 May 2015 05:26 AM PDT
Scientists have come a step closer to understanding why people exposed to household air pollution (HAP) are at higher risk of lung infections such as pneumonia and tuberculosis. Three billion people worldwide are exposed to HAP from the fuels they burn to cook, light and heat with at home. Frequently, charcoal, wood and food waste are burned and generate high concentrations of smoke particles. This exposure is associated with increased risk of pneumonia, particularly in low and middle income countries where bacterial pneumonia is the biggest cause of infant mortality. This risk is well known, but the reasons are not.
Posted: 08 May 2015 05:26 AM PDT
A revolutionary ‘smart’ cane enabling the visually impaired to instantly identify friends and family could be available soon, thanks to students at a British university. The ‘XploR’ mobility cane uses smartphone technology to recognize familiar faces from up to 10 metres away. The cane also features GPS functionality to aid navigation.
Posted: 08 May 2015 05:26 AM PDT
The ability that some people have to use echoes to determine the position of an otherwise silent object, in a similar way to bats and dolphins, requires good high-pitch hearing in both ears, according to new research. This builds on recent research that demonstrated conclusively that some sighted and blind people could use echoes in this way. What wasn't clear until now was how important high-frequency hearing in both ears is.
Posted: 08 May 2015 05:23 AM PDT
People with PTSD may also be at risk for accelerated aging or premature senescence, research suggests. The researchers noted that there has not been another study that links PTSD, a psychological disorder with no established genetic basis, to a basic biological process such as aging.
Posted: 07 May 2015 06:29 PM PDT
Scientists have identified a protein on the surface of human red blood cells that serves as an essential entry point for invasion by the malaria parasite. This discovery opens up a promising new avenue for the development of therapies to treat and prevent malaria
Posted: 07 May 2015 11:50 AM PDT
Newly evolved genes can rapidly assume control over fundamental functions during early embryonic development. The findings suggest that evolutionary changes to the genetics of fundamental biological processes occur more frequently than previously thought.









































FDA  inspectors report long list of problems at Blue Bell plants Inspection teams from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration reported numerous problems after recent visits to three production facilities owned and operated by Blue Bell Creameries The company announced that it was recalling all products (ice cream, frozen yogurt, sherbet and frozen desserts) manufactured at all of its plants after receiving positive Listeria...
New form of DNA modification may carry inheritable information The surprising discovery and function of a new DNA modification in insects, worms, and algae has been described in a new article
’Super-cool' way to deliver drugs Some substances, when they undergo a process called 'rapid-freezing' or 'supercooling,' remain in liquid form -- even at below-freezing temperatures. A new study is the first to break down the rules governing the complex process of crystallization through rapid-cooling. Its findings may revolutionize the delivery of drugs in the human body, providing a way to 'freeze' the drugs at an optimal time and location in the body.
Negative regulator of natural killer cell maturation discovered A new study has identified a regulatory pathway in natural killer cells that inhibits their maturation and homing behavior. Natural killer cells are one of the body's first lines of defense against viruses and cancer. The findings could lead to new strategies for boosting natural-killer cell activity against cancer and viral infections, scientists say.
People with diabetes who enroll in a health plan tailored to their medical condition are more likely to stick to their medication and actively take charge of their own health care, research into the effectiveness of the Diabetes Health Plan finds.



Posted: 07 May 2015 06:31 PM PDT
Researchers have developed artificial membranes with programmable features, enabling studies of cell communication and the molecular basis of disease. The new study demonstrates how researchers can examine the interactions of cell surfaces with other biological molecules, with far ranging applications in medicine, biochemistry and biophysics.
Posted: 07 May 2015 01:54 PM PDT
The difference between life and death in the operating room, on the battlefield or during a police shootout often comes down to the ability to adapt to the unexpected. Sleep deprivation may make it difficult to do so, according to a study that for the first time created a laboratory experiment that simulates how sleep loss affects critical aspects of decision making in high-stakes, real-world situations
Posted: 07 May 2015 01:54 PM PDT
Researchers are reporting a case study in which viable Ebola virus was present in the eye’s aqueous humor — the clear fluid in the front of the eye, between the lens and the cornea — 10 weeks after the virus was no longer detectable in the patient’s blood.
Posted: 07 May 2015 12:41 PM PDT
The popularity of bamboo landscaping could increase the spread of hantavirus, researchers say, with the plant's prolific seed production creating a population boom among seed-eating deer mice that carry the disease.
Posted: 07 May 2015 12:41 PM PDT
The United States makes up less than five percent of the world's population but consumes 80 percent of the global opioid supply and approximately 99 percent of all hydrocodone -- the most commonly prescribed opioid in the world.
Posted: 07 May 2015 12:39 PM PDT
By increasing the stiffness of erythrocytes infected by the causal agent of malaria, Viagra favors their elimination from the blood circulation and may therefore reduce transmission of the parasite from humans to mosquitoes. This astonishing discovery could lead to a treatment to reduce the spread of malaria within a population
Posted: 07 May 2015 11:53 AM PDT
In a study of nearly 26,000 beneficiaries of Tricare, the military health system, those taking statin drugs to control their cholesterol were 87 percent more likely to develop diabetes. The research confirms past findings on the link between the widely prescribed drugs and diabetes risk. But it is among the first to show the connection in a relatively healthy group of people. The study included only people who at baseline were free of heart disease, diabetes, and other severe chronic disease.
Posted: 07 May 2015 11:52 AM PDT
A promising new therapeutic approach for hereditary blindness based on a technology termed 'optogenetics' is to introduce light-sensing proteins into these surviving retinal cells, turning them into 'replacement photoreceptors' and thereby restoring vision. However, several factors limit the feasibility of a clinical optogenetic therapy using traditional light-sensitive proteins, as they require unnaturally high and potentially harmful light intensities and employ a foreign signaling mechanism within the target retinal cells.
Posted: 07 May 2015 11:51 AM PDT
Chagas disease, caused by the Trypanosoma cruzi parasite and transmitted by insects in Latin America is among the most common tropical diseases, and so far without effective vaccine. A new study now shows that a candidate vaccine can induce long-lasting immunity against the parasite in mice
Posted: 07 May 2015 11:51 AM PDT
The Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx) project consortia has now published its results from their first pilot study contributing to a better understanding of genomic variation and give us new clues about disease susceptibility
Posted: 07 May 2015 10:59 AM PDT
Arginine, a common amino acid found naturally in foods, breaks down dental plaque, which could help millions of people avoid cavities and gum disease, researchers have discovered.
Posted: 07 May 2015 10:59 AM PDT
Medications have long been used to treat pain caused by injury or chronic conditions. Unfortunately, most are short-term fixes or cause side effects that limit their use. Researchers have discovered a new compound that offers longer lasting painkilling effects, and shows promise as an alternative to current anesthetics
Posted: 07 May 2015 09:29 AM PDT
Patients undergoing colorectal operations who participated in an enhanced recovery program left the hospital sooner and had significantly lower hospital costs than patients who had the traditional approach to their care, according to a new study, which also found further postoperative improvements after adding an infection prevention protocol
Posted: 07 May 2015 09:29 AM PDT
In patients with primary snoring or mild OSA, oropharyngeal, or mouth and tongue, exercises significantly reduced the frequency of snoring by 36 percent and total power of snoring by 59 percent, a study concludes.
Posted: 07 May 2015 08:42 AM PDT
Compliance with post-treatment surveillance, income level and the travel distance for follow-up care had effects on survival in patients with head and neck squamous cell cancer, according to a report
Posted: 07 May 2015 08:40 AM PDT
Spending on postacute care in skilled nursing facilities (SNFs) provides a key signal of inefficiency in the health care system, leading to higher spending and lower patient survival, experts say in a new report.
Posted: 07 May 2015 06:31 AM PDT
Obesity and depression – not only lack of sleep – are underlying causes for regular drowsiness, according to researchers. They say the findings could lead to more personalized sleep medicine for those with excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS
Posted: 07 May 2015 06:31 AM PDT
A green dye that sticks to bone grafts becomes antimicrobial with the flick of a light switch and could help reduce the risk of infections during bone-reconstruction surgeries, scientists report. In theory, they explain, the dye could be added to the currently used protocols for sterilizing the bone prior to use in surgery.
Posted: 07 May 2015 05:24 AM PDT
A new device for performing skin biopsies has been created by scientists. With this new tool a skin biopsy can be performed with fewer instruments and the length of the procedure is shortened from thirty minutes to less than five. Neither local anesthesia nor specialized personnel are required. As a result, faster diagnosis of pathologies such as skin cancer is possible
Posted: 07 May 2015 05:24 AM PDT
Tiny, complex scaffolds that mimic the intricate network of collagen fibers that form the human eardrum have been created by an international team of researchers. It is hoped the scaffolds can be used to replace eardrums when they become severely damaged, reducing the need for patients to have their own tissue used in reconstruction surgery.
Posted: 07 May 2015 05:19 AM PDT
Melanoma is aggressive and life-threatening. If it is not detected early, the prospects of recovery drop. Screening is complicated, though. Together with several project partners, researchers have developed an assistance system that helps dermatologists with diagnosis.
Posted: 08 May 2015 11:03 AM PDT
Scientists have been manipulating genes for a while. Now researchers have found a way to control the process with higher precision, by using light.
Posted: 08 May 2015 08:05 AM PDT
New research shows how a single growth factor receptor protein programs the entire genome. The study provides evidence that it all begins with a single "master" growth factor receptor that regulates the entire genome.
Posted: 08 May 2015 07:58 AM PDT
Countless research and self-help books claim that having more sex will lead to increased happiness, based on the common finding that those having more sex are also happier. Scientists now report that simply having more sex did not make couples happier, in part because the increased frequency led to a decline in wanting for and enjoyment of sex.
Posted: 08 May 2015 06:16 AM PDT
Non-suicidal self-injury -- that is, purposefully hurting oneself without conscious suicidal intent -- is relatively common among Iraq and Afghanistan veterans, and it is a strong risk factor for suicidal behavior, according to research.
Posted: 08 May 2015 06:14 AM PDT
A new locator feature on a search and rescue tool can pinpoint the location of a victim to within about five feet – saving rescuers time and increasing chances for locating survivors.
Posted: 08 May 2015 05:26 AM PDT
Scientists have come a step closer to understanding why people exposed to household air pollution (HAP) are at higher risk of lung infections such as pneumonia and tuberculosis. Three billion people worldwide are exposed to HAP from the fuels they burn to cook, light and heat with at home. Frequently, charcoal, wood and food waste are burned and generate high concentrations of smoke particles. This exposure is associated with increased risk of pneumonia, particularly in low and middle income countries where bacterial pneumonia is the biggest cause of infant mortality. This risk is well known, but the reasons are not.
Posted: 08 May 2015 05:26 AM PDT
A revolutionary ‘smart’ cane enabling the visually impaired to instantly identify friends and family could be available soon, thanks to students at a British university. The ‘XploR’ mobility cane uses smartphone technology to recognize familiar faces from up to 10 metres away. The cane also features GPS functionality to aid navigation.
Posted: 08 May 2015 05:26 AM PDT
The ability that some people have to use echoes to determine the position of an otherwise silent object, in a similar way to bats and dolphins, requires good high-pitch hearing in both ears, according to new research. This builds on recent research that demonstrated conclusively that some sighted and blind people could use echoes in this way. What wasn't clear until now was how important high-frequency hearing in both ears is.
Posted: 08 May 2015 05:23 AM PDT
People with PTSD may also be at risk for accelerated aging or premature senescence, research suggests. The researchers noted that there has not been another study that links PTSD, a psychological disorder with no established genetic basis, to a basic biological process such as aging.
Posted: 07 May 2015 06:29 PM PDT
Scientists have identified a protein on the surface of human red blood cells that serves as an essential entry point for invasion by the malaria parasite. This discovery opens up a promising new avenue for the development of therapies to treat and prevent malaria
Posted: 07 May 2015 11:50 AM PDT
Newly evolved genes can rapidly assume control over fundamental functions during early embryonic development. The findings suggest that evolutionary changes to the genetics of fundamental biological processes occur more frequently than previously thought.









































FDA  inspectors report long list of problems at Blue Bell plants Inspection teams from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration reported numerous problems after recent visits to three production facilities owned and operated by Blue Bell Creameries The company announced that it was recalling all products (ice cream, frozen yogurt, sherbet and frozen desserts) manufactured at all of its plants after receiving positive Listeria...
New form of DNA modification may carry inheritable information The surprising discovery and function of a new DNA modification in insects, worms, and algae has been described in a new article
’Super-cool' way to deliver drugs Some substances, when they undergo a process called 'rapid-freezing' or 'supercooling,' remain in liquid form -- even at below-freezing temperatures. A new study is the first to break down the rules governing the complex process of crystallization through rapid-cooling. Its findings may revolutionize the delivery of drugs in the human body, providing a way to 'freeze' the drugs at an optimal time and location in the body.
Negative regulator of natural killer cell maturation discovered A new study has identified a regulatory pathway in natural killer cells that inhibits their maturation and homing behavior. Natural killer cells are one of the body's first lines of defense against viruses and cancer. The findings could lead to new strategies for boosting natural-killer cell activity against cancer and viral infections, scientists say.
People with diabetes who enroll in a health plan tailored to their medical condition are more likely to stick to their medication and actively take charge of their own health care, research into the effectiveness of the Diabetes Health Plan finds.



Posted: 07 May 2015 06:31 PM PDT
Researchers have developed artificial membranes with programmable features, enabling studies of cell communication and the molecular basis of disease. The new study demonstrates how researchers can examine the interactions of cell surfaces with other biological molecules, with far ranging applications in medicine, biochemistry and biophysics.
Posted: 07 May 2015 01:54 PM PDT
The difference between life and death in the operating room, on the battlefield or during a police shootout often comes down to the ability to adapt to the unexpected. Sleep deprivation may make it difficult to do so, according to a study that for the first time created a laboratory experiment that simulates how sleep loss affects critical aspects of decision making in high-stakes, real-world situations
Posted: 07 May 2015 01:54 PM PDT
Researchers are reporting a case study in which viable Ebola virus was present in the eye’s aqueous humor — the clear fluid in the front of the eye, between the lens and the cornea — 10 weeks after the virus was no longer detectable in the patient’s blood.
Posted: 07 May 2015 12:41 PM PDT
The popularity of bamboo landscaping could increase the spread of hantavirus, researchers say, with the plant's prolific seed production creating a population boom among seed-eating deer mice that carry the disease.
Posted: 07 May 2015 12:41 PM PDT
The United States makes up less than five percent of the world's population but consumes 80 percent of the global opioid supply and approximately 99 percent of all hydrocodone -- the most commonly prescribed opioid in the world.
Posted: 07 May 2015 12:39 PM PDT
By increasing the stiffness of erythrocytes infected by the causal agent of malaria, Viagra favors their elimination from the blood circulation and may therefore reduce transmission of the parasite from humans to mosquitoes. This astonishing discovery could lead to a treatment to reduce the spread of malaria within a population
Posted: 07 May 2015 11:53 AM PDT
In a study of nearly 26,000 beneficiaries of Tricare, the military health system, those taking statin drugs to control their cholesterol were 87 percent more likely to develop diabetes. The research confirms past findings on the link between the widely prescribed drugs and diabetes risk. But it is among the first to show the connection in a relatively healthy group of people. The study included only people who at baseline were free of heart disease, diabetes, and other severe chronic disease.
Posted: 07 May 2015 11:52 AM PDT
A promising new therapeutic approach for hereditary blindness based on a technology termed 'optogenetics' is to introduce light-sensing proteins into these surviving retinal cells, turning them into 'replacement photoreceptors' and thereby restoring vision. However, several factors limit the feasibility of a clinical optogenetic therapy using traditional light-sensitive proteins, as they require unnaturally high and potentially harmful light intensities and employ a foreign signaling mechanism within the target retinal cells.
Posted: 07 May 2015 11:51 AM PDT
Chagas disease, caused by the Trypanosoma cruzi parasite and transmitted by insects in Latin America is among the most common tropical diseases, and so far without effective vaccine. A new study now shows that a candidate vaccine can induce long-lasting immunity against the parasite in mice
Posted: 07 May 2015 11:51 AM PDT
The Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx) project consortia has now published its results from their first pilot study contributing to a better understanding of genomic variation and give us new clues about disease susceptibility
Posted: 07 May 2015 10:59 AM PDT
Arginine, a common amino acid found naturally in foods, breaks down dental plaque, which could help millions of people avoid cavities and gum disease, researchers have discovered.
Posted: 07 May 2015 10:59 AM PDT
Medications have long been used to treat pain caused by injury or chronic conditions. Unfortunately, most are short-term fixes or cause side effects that limit their use. Researchers have discovered a new compound that offers longer lasting painkilling effects, and shows promise as an alternative to current anesthetics
Posted: 07 May 2015 09:29 AM PDT
Patients undergoing colorectal operations who participated in an enhanced recovery program left the hospital sooner and had significantly lower hospital costs than patients who had the traditional approach to their care, according to a new study, which also found further postoperative improvements after adding an infection prevention protocol
Posted: 07 May 2015 09:29 AM PDT
In patients with primary snoring or mild OSA, oropharyngeal, or mouth and tongue, exercises significantly reduced the frequency of snoring by 36 percent and total power of snoring by 59 percent, a study concludes.
Posted: 07 May 2015 08:42 AM PDT
Compliance with post-treatment surveillance, income level and the travel distance for follow-up care had effects on survival in patients with head and neck squamous cell cancer, according to a report
Posted: 07 May 2015 08:40 AM PDT
Spending on postacute care in skilled nursing facilities (SNFs) provides a key signal of inefficiency in the health care system, leading to higher spending and lower patient survival, experts say in a new report.
Posted: 07 May 2015 06:31 AM PDT
Obesity and depression – not only lack of sleep – are underlying causes for regular drowsiness, according to researchers. They say the findings could lead to more personalized sleep medicine for those with excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS
Posted: 07 May 2015 06:31 AM PDT
A green dye that sticks to bone grafts becomes antimicrobial with the flick of a light switch and could help reduce the risk of infections during bone-reconstruction surgeries, scientists report. In theory, they explain, the dye could be added to the currently used protocols for sterilizing the bone prior to use in surgery.
Posted: 07 May 2015 05:24 AM PDT
A new device for performing skin biopsies has been created by scientists. With this new tool a skin biopsy can be performed with fewer instruments and the length of the procedure is shortened from thirty minutes to less than five. Neither local anesthesia nor specialized personnel are required. As a result, faster diagnosis of pathologies such as skin cancer is possible
Posted: 07 May 2015 05:24 AM PDT
Tiny, complex scaffolds that mimic the intricate network of collagen fibers that form the human eardrum have been created by an international team of researchers. It is hoped the scaffolds can be used to replace eardrums when they become severely damaged, reducing the need for patients to have their own tissue used in reconstruction surgery.
Posted: 07 May 2015 05:19 AM PDT
Melanoma is aggressive and life-threatening. If it is not detected early, the prospects of recovery drop. Screening is complicated, though. Together with several project partners, researchers have developed an assistance system that helps dermatologists with diagnosis.
Posted: 08 May 2015 11:03 AM PDT
Scientists have been manipulating genes for a while. Now researchers have found a way to control the process with higher precision, by using light.
Posted: 08 May 2015 08:05 AM PDT
New research shows how a single growth factor receptor protein programs the entire genome. The study provides evidence that it all begins with a single "master" growth factor receptor that regulates the entire genome.
Posted: 08 May 2015 07:58 AM PDT
Countless research and self-help books claim that having more sex will lead to increased happiness, based on the common finding that those having more sex are also happier. Scientists now report that simply having more sex did not make couples happier, in part because the increased frequency led to a decline in wanting for and enjoyment of sex.
Posted: 08 May 2015 06:16 AM PDT
Non-suicidal self-injury -- that is, purposefully hurting oneself without conscious suicidal intent -- is relatively common among Iraq and Afghanistan veterans, and it is a strong risk factor for suicidal behavior, according to research.
Posted: 08 May 2015 06:14 AM PDT
A new locator feature on a search and rescue tool can pinpoint the location of a victim to within about five feet – saving rescuers time and increasing chances for locating survivors.
Posted: 08 May 2015 05:26 AM PDT
Scientists have come a step closer to understanding why people exposed to household air pollution (HAP) are at higher risk of lung infections such as pneumonia and tuberculosis. Three billion people worldwide are exposed to HAP from the fuels they burn to cook, light and heat with at home. Frequently, charcoal, wood and food waste are burned and generate high concentrations of smoke particles. This exposure is associated with increased risk of pneumonia, particularly in low and middle income countries where bacterial pneumonia is the biggest cause of infant mortality. This risk is well known, but the reasons are not.
Posted: 08 May 2015 05:26 AM PDT
A revolutionary ‘smart’ cane enabling the visually impaired to instantly identify friends and family could be available soon, thanks to students at a British university. The ‘XploR’ mobility cane uses smartphone technology to recognize familiar faces from up to 10 metres away. The cane also features GPS functionality to aid navigation.
Posted: 08 May 2015 05:26 AM PDT
The ability that some people have to use echoes to determine the position of an otherwise silent object, in a similar way to bats and dolphins, requires good high-pitch hearing in both ears, according to new research. This builds on recent research that demonstrated conclusively that some sighted and blind people could use echoes in this way. What wasn't clear until now was how important high-frequency hearing in both ears is.
Posted: 08 May 2015 05:23 AM PDT
People with PTSD may also be at risk for accelerated aging or premature senescence, research suggests. The researchers noted that there has not been another study that links PTSD, a psychological disorder with no established genetic basis, to a basic biological process such as aging.
Posted: 07 May 2015 06:29 PM PDT
Scientists have identified a protein on the surface of human red blood cells that serves as an essential entry point for invasion by the malaria parasite. This discovery opens up a promising new avenue for the development of therapies to treat and prevent malaria
Posted: 07 May 2015 11:50 AM PDT
Newly evolved genes can rapidly assume control over fundamental functions during early embryonic development. The findings suggest that evolutionary changes to the genetics of fundamental biological processes occur more frequently than previously thought.









































FDA  inspectors report long list of problems at Blue Bell plants Inspection teams from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration reported numerous problems after recent visits to three production facilities owned and operated by Blue Bell Creameries The company announced that it was recalling all products (ice cream, frozen yogurt, sherbet and frozen desserts) manufactured at all of its plants after receiving positive Listeria...
New form of DNA modification may carry inheritable information The surprising discovery and function of a new DNA modification in insects, worms, and algae has been described in a new article
’Super-cool' way to deliver drugs Some substances, when they undergo a process called 'rapid-freezing' or 'supercooling,' remain in liquid form -- even at below-freezing temperatures. A new study is the first to break down the rules governing the complex process of crystallization through rapid-cooling. Its findings may revolutionize the delivery of drugs in the human body, providing a way to 'freeze' the drugs at an optimal time and location in the body.
Negative regulator of natural killer cell maturation discovered A new study has identified a regulatory pathway in natural killer cells that inhibits their maturation and homing behavior. Natural killer cells are one of the body's first lines of defense against viruses and cancer. The findings could lead to new strategies for boosting natural-killer cell activity against cancer and viral infections, scientists say.
People with diabetes who enroll in a health plan tailored to their medical condition are more likely to stick to their medication and actively take charge of their own health care, research into the effectiveness of the Diabetes Health Plan finds.



Posted: 07 May 2015 06:31 PM PDT
Researchers have developed artificial membranes with programmable features, enabling studies of cell communication and the molecular basis of disease. The new study demonstrates how researchers can examine the interactions of cell surfaces with other biological molecules, with far ranging applications in medicine, biochemistry and biophysics.
Posted: 07 May 2015 01:54 PM PDT
The difference between life and death in the operating room, on the battlefield or during a police shootout often comes down to the ability to adapt to the unexpected. Sleep deprivation may make it difficult to do so, according to a study that for the first time created a laboratory experiment that simulates how sleep loss affects critical aspects of decision making in high-stakes, real-world situations
Posted: 07 May 2015 01:54 PM PDT
Researchers are reporting a case study in which viable Ebola virus was present in the eye’s aqueous humor — the clear fluid in the front of the eye, between the lens and the cornea — 10 weeks after the virus was no longer detectable in the patient’s blood.
Posted: 07 May 2015 12:41 PM PDT
The popularity of bamboo landscaping could increase the spread of hantavirus, researchers say, with the plant's prolific seed production creating a population boom among seed-eating deer mice that carry the disease.
Posted: 07 May 2015 12:41 PM PDT
The United States makes up less than five percent of the world's population but consumes 80 percent of the global opioid supply and approximately 99 percent of all hydrocodone -- the most commonly prescribed opioid in the world.
Posted: 07 May 2015 12:39 PM PDT
By increasing the stiffness of erythrocytes infected by the causal agent of malaria, Viagra favors their elimination from the blood circulation and may therefore reduce transmission of the parasite from humans to mosquitoes. This astonishing discovery could lead to a treatment to reduce the spread of malaria within a population
Posted: 07 May 2015 11:53 AM PDT
In a study of nearly 26,000 beneficiaries of Tricare, the military health system, those taking statin drugs to control their cholesterol were 87 percent more likely to develop diabetes. The research confirms past findings on the link between the widely prescribed drugs and diabetes risk. But it is among the first to show the connection in a relatively healthy group of people. The study included only people who at baseline were free of heart disease, diabetes, and other severe chronic disease.
Posted: 07 May 2015 11:52 AM PDT
A promising new therapeutic approach for hereditary blindness based on a technology termed 'optogenetics' is to introduce light-sensing proteins into these surviving retinal cells, turning them into 'replacement photoreceptors' and thereby restoring vision. However, several factors limit the feasibility of a clinical optogenetic therapy using traditional light-sensitive proteins, as they require unnaturally high and potentially harmful light intensities and employ a foreign signaling mechanism within the target retinal cells.
Posted: 07 May 2015 11:51 AM PDT
Chagas disease, caused by the Trypanosoma cruzi parasite and transmitted by insects in Latin America is among the most common tropical diseases, and so far without effective vaccine. A new study now shows that a candidate vaccine can induce long-lasting immunity against the parasite in mice
Posted: 07 May 2015 11:51 AM PDT
The Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx) project consortia has now published its results from their first pilot study contributing to a better understanding of genomic variation and give us new clues about disease susceptibility
Posted: 07 May 2015 10:59 AM PDT
Arginine, a common amino acid found naturally in foods, breaks down dental plaque, which could help millions of people avoid cavities and gum disease, researchers have discovered.
Posted: 07 May 2015 10:59 AM PDT
Medications have long been used to treat pain caused by injury or chronic conditions. Unfortunately, most are short-term fixes or cause side effects that limit their use. Researchers have discovered a new compound that offers longer lasting painkilling effects, and shows promise as an alternative to current anesthetics
Posted: 07 May 2015 09:29 AM PDT
Patients undergoing colorectal operations who participated in an enhanced recovery program left the hospital sooner and had significantly lower hospital costs than patients who had the traditional approach to their care, according to a new study, which also found further postoperative improvements after adding an infection prevention protocol
Posted: 07 May 2015 09:29 AM PDT
In patients with primary snoring or mild OSA, oropharyngeal, or mouth and tongue, exercises significantly reduced the frequency of snoring by 36 percent and total power of snoring by 59 percent, a study concludes.
Posted: 07 May 2015 08:42 AM PDT
Compliance with post-treatment surveillance, income level and the travel distance for follow-up care had effects on survival in patients with head and neck squamous cell cancer, according to a report
Posted: 07 May 2015 08:40 AM PDT
Spending on postacute care in skilled nursing facilities (SNFs) provides a key signal of inefficiency in the health care system, leading to higher spending and lower patient survival, experts say in a new report.
Posted: 07 May 2015 06:31 AM PDT
Obesity and depression – not only lack of sleep – are underlying causes for regular drowsiness, according to researchers. They say the findings could lead to more personalized sleep medicine for those with excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS
Posted: 07 May 2015 06:31 AM PDT
A green dye that sticks to bone grafts becomes antimicrobial with the flick of a light switch and could help reduce the risk of infections during bone-reconstruction surgeries, scientists report. In theory, they explain, the dye could be added to the currently used protocols for sterilizing the bone prior to use in surgery.
Posted: 07 May 2015 05:24 AM PDT
A new device for performing skin biopsies has been created by scientists. With this new tool a skin biopsy can be performed with fewer instruments and the length of the procedure is shortened from thirty minutes to less than five. Neither local anesthesia nor specialized personnel are required. As a result, faster diagnosis of pathologies such as skin cancer is possible
Posted: 07 May 2015 05:24 AM PDT
Tiny, complex scaffolds that mimic the intricate network of collagen fibers that form the human eardrum have been created by an international team of researchers. It is hoped the scaffolds can be used to replace eardrums when they become severely damaged, reducing the need for patients to have their own tissue used in reconstruction surgery.
Posted: 07 May 2015 05:19 AM PDT
Melanoma is aggressive and life-threatening. If it is not detected early, the prospects of recovery drop. Screening is complicated, though. Together with several project partners, researchers have developed an assistance system that helps dermatologists with diagnosis.
Posted: 08 May 2015 11:03 AM PDT
Scientists have been manipulating genes for a while. Now researchers have found a way to control the process with higher precision, by using light.
Posted: 08 May 2015 08:05 AM PDT
New research shows how a single growth factor receptor protein programs the entire genome. The study provides evidence that it all begins with a single "master" growth factor receptor that regulates the entire genome.
Posted: 08 May 2015 07:58 AM PDT
Countless research and self-help books claim that having more sex will lead to increased happiness, based on the common finding that those having more sex are also happier. Scientists now report that simply having more sex did not make couples happier, in part because the increased frequency led to a decline in wanting for and enjoyment of sex.
Posted: 08 May 2015 06:16 AM PDT
Non-suicidal self-injury -- that is, purposefully hurting oneself without conscious suicidal intent -- is relatively common among Iraq and Afghanistan veterans, and it is a strong risk factor for suicidal behavior, according to research.
Posted: 08 May 2015 06:14 AM PDT
A new locator feature on a search and rescue tool can pinpoint the location of a victim to within about five feet – saving rescuers time and increasing chances for locating survivors.
Posted: 08 May 2015 05:26 AM PDT
Scientists have come a step closer to understanding why people exposed to household air pollution (HAP) are at higher risk of lung infections such as pneumonia and tuberculosis. Three billion people worldwide are exposed to HAP from the fuels they burn to cook, light and heat with at home. Frequently, charcoal, wood and food waste are burned and generate high concentrations of smoke particles. This exposure is associated with increased risk of pneumonia, particularly in low and middle income countries where bacterial pneumonia is the biggest cause of infant mortality. This risk is well known, but the reasons are not.
Posted: 08 May 2015 05:26 AM PDT
A revolutionary ‘smart’ cane enabling the visually impaired to instantly identify friends and family could be available soon, thanks to students at a British university. The ‘XploR’ mobility cane uses smartphone technology to recognize familiar faces from up to 10 metres away. The cane also features GPS functionality to aid navigation.
Posted: 08 May 2015 05:26 AM PDT
The ability that some people have to use echoes to determine the position of an otherwise silent object, in a similar way to bats and dolphins, requires good high-pitch hearing in both ears, according to new research. This builds on recent research that demonstrated conclusively that some sighted and blind people could use echoes in this way. What wasn't clear until now was how important high-frequency hearing in both ears is.
Posted: 08 May 2015 05:23 AM PDT
People with PTSD may also be at risk for accelerated aging or premature senescence, research suggests. The researchers noted that there has not been another study that links PTSD, a psychological disorder with no established genetic basis, to a basic biological process such as aging.
Posted: 07 May 2015 06:29 PM PDT
Scientists have identified a protein on the surface of human red blood cells that serves as an essential entry point for invasion by the malaria parasite. This discovery opens up a promising new avenue for the development of therapies to treat and prevent malaria
Posted: 07 May 2015 11:50 AM PDT
Newly evolved genes can rapidly assume control over fundamental functions during early embryonic development. The findings suggest that evolutionary changes to the genetics of fundamental biological processes occur more frequently than previously thought.

















































FDA  inspectors report long list of problems at Blue Bell plants Inspection teams from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration reported numerous problems after recent visits to three production facilities owned and operated by Blue Bell Creameries The company announced that it was recalling all products (ice cream, frozen yogurt, sherbet and frozen desserts) manufactured at all of its plants after receiving positive Listeria...
New form of DNA modification may carry inheritable information The surprising discovery and function of a new DNA modification in insects, worms, and algae has been described in a new article
’Super-cool' way to deliver drugs Some substances, when they undergo a process called 'rapid-freezing' or 'supercooling,' remain in liquid form -- even at below-freezing temperatures. A new study is the first to break down the rules governing the complex process of crystallization through rapid-cooling. Its findings may revolutionize the delivery of drugs in the human body, providing a way to 'freeze' the drugs at an optimal time and location in the body.
Negative regulator of natural killer cell maturation discovered A new study has identified a regulatory pathway in natural killer cells that inhibits their maturation and homing behavior. Natural killer cells are one of the body's first lines of defense against viruses and cancer. The findings could lead to new strategies for boosting natural-killer cell activity against cancer and viral infections, scientists say.
People with diabetes who enroll in a health plan tailored to their medical condition are more likely to stick to their medication and actively take charge of their own health care, research into the effectiveness of the Diabetes Health Plan finds.



Posted: 07 May 2015 06:31 PM PDT
Researchers have developed artificial membranes with programmable features, enabling studies of cell communication and the molecular basis of disease. The new study demonstrates how researchers can examine the interactions of cell surfaces with other biological molecules, with far ranging applications in medicine, biochemistry and biophysics.
Posted: 07 May 2015 01:54 PM PDT
The difference between life and death in the operating room, on the battlefield or during a police shootout often comes down to the ability to adapt to the unexpected. Sleep deprivation may make it difficult to do so, according to a study that for the first time created a laboratory experiment that simulates how sleep loss affects critical aspects of decision making in high-stakes, real-world situations
Posted: 07 May 2015 01:54 PM PDT
Researchers are reporting a case study in which viable Ebola virus was present in the eye’s aqueous humor — the clear fluid in the front of the eye, between the lens and the cornea — 10 weeks after the virus was no longer detectable in the patient’s blood.
Posted: 07 May 2015 12:41 PM PDT
The popularity of bamboo landscaping could increase the spread of hantavirus, researchers say, with the plant's prolific seed production creating a population boom among seed-eating deer mice that carry the disease.
Posted: 07 May 2015 12:41 PM PDT
The United States makes up less than five percent of the world's population but consumes 80 percent of the global opioid supply and approximately 99 percent of all hydrocodone -- the most commonly prescribed opioid in the world.
Posted: 07 May 2015 12:39 PM PDT
By increasing the stiffness of erythrocytes infected by the causal agent of malaria, Viagra favors their elimination from the blood circulation and may therefore reduce transmission of the parasite from humans to mosquitoes. This astonishing discovery could lead to a treatment to reduce the spread of malaria within a population
Posted: 07 May 2015 11:53 AM PDT
In a study of nearly 26,000 beneficiaries of Tricare, the military health system, those taking statin drugs to control their cholesterol were 87 percent more likely to develop diabetes. The research confirms past findings on the link between the widely prescribed drugs and diabetes risk. But it is among the first to show the connection in a relatively healthy group of people. The study included only people who at baseline were free of heart disease, diabetes, and other severe chronic disease.
Posted: 07 May 2015 11:52 AM PDT
A promising new therapeutic approach for hereditary blindness based on a technology termed 'optogenetics' is to introduce light-sensing proteins into these surviving retinal cells, turning them into 'replacement photoreceptors' and thereby restoring vision. However, several factors limit the feasibility of a clinical optogenetic therapy using traditional light-sensitive proteins, as they require unnaturally high and potentially harmful light intensities and employ a foreign signaling mechanism within the target retinal cells.
Posted: 07 May 2015 11:51 AM PDT
Chagas disease, caused by the Trypanosoma cruzi parasite and transmitted by insects in Latin America is among the most common tropical diseases, and so far without effective vaccine. A new study now shows that a candidate vaccine can induce long-lasting immunity against the parasite in mice
Posted: 07 May 2015 11:51 AM PDT
The Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx) project consortia has now published its results from their first pilot study contributing to a better understanding of genomic variation and give us new clues about disease susceptibility
Posted: 07 May 2015 10:59 AM PDT
Arginine, a common amino acid found naturally in foods, breaks down dental plaque, which could help millions of people avoid cavities and gum disease, researchers have discovered.
Posted: 07 May 2015 10:59 AM PDT
Medications have long been used to treat pain caused by injury or chronic conditions. Unfortunately, most are short-term fixes or cause side effects that limit their use. Researchers have discovered a new compound that offers longer lasting painkilling effects, and shows promise as an alternative to current anesthetics
Posted: 07 May 2015 09:29 AM PDT
Patients undergoing colorectal operations who participated in an enhanced recovery program left the hospital sooner and had significantly lower hospital costs than patients who had the traditional approach to their care, according to a new study, which also found further postoperative improvements after adding an infection prevention protocol
Posted: 07 May 2015 09:29 AM PDT
In patients with primary snoring or mild OSA, oropharyngeal, or mouth and tongue, exercises significantly reduced the frequency of snoring by 36 percent and total power of snoring by 59 percent, a study concludes.
Posted: 07 May 2015 08:42 AM PDT
Compliance with post-treatment surveillance, income level and the travel distance for follow-up care had effects on survival in patients with head and neck squamous cell cancer, according to a report
Posted: 07 May 2015 08:40 AM PDT
Spending on postacute care in skilled nursing facilities (SNFs) provides a key signal of inefficiency in the health care system, leading to higher spending and lower patient survival, experts say in a new report.
Posted: 07 May 2015 06:31 AM PDT
Obesity and depression – not only lack of sleep – are underlying causes for regular drowsiness, according to researchers. They say the findings could lead to more personalized sleep medicine for those with excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS
Posted: 07 May 2015 06:31 AM PDT
A green dye that sticks to bone grafts becomes antimicrobial with the flick of a light switch and could help reduce the risk of infections during bone-reconstruction surgeries, scientists report. In theory, they explain, the dye could be added to the currently used protocols for sterilizing the bone prior to use in surgery.
Posted: 07 May 2015 05:24 AM PDT
A new device for performing skin biopsies has been created by scientists. With this new tool a skin biopsy can be performed with fewer instruments and the length of the procedure is shortened from thirty minutes to less than five. Neither local anesthesia nor specialized personnel are required. As a result, faster diagnosis of pathologies such as skin cancer is possible
Posted: 07 May 2015 05:24 AM PDT
Tiny, complex scaffolds that mimic the intricate network of collagen fibers that form the human eardrum have been created by an international team of researchers. It is hoped the scaffolds can be used to replace eardrums when they become severely damaged, reducing the need for patients to have their own tissue used in reconstruction surgery.
Posted: 07 May 2015 05:19 AM PDT
Melanoma is aggressive and life-threatening. If it is not detected early, the prospects of recovery drop. Screening is complicated, though. Together with several project partners, researchers have developed an assistance system that helps dermatologists with diagnosis.
Posted: 08 May 2015 11:03 AM PDT
Scientists have been manipulating genes for a while. Now researchers have found a way to control the process with higher precision, by using light.
Posted: 08 May 2015 08:05 AM PDT
New research shows how a single growth factor receptor protein programs the entire genome. The study provides evidence that it all begins with a single "master" growth factor receptor that regulates the entire genome.
Posted: 08 May 2015 07:58 AM PDT
Countless research and self-help books claim that having more sex will lead to increased happiness, based on the common finding that those having more sex are also happier. Scientists now report that simply having more sex did not make couples happier, in part because the increased frequency led to a decline in wanting for and enjoyment of sex.
Posted: 08 May 2015 06:16 AM PDT
Non-suicidal self-injury -- that is, purposefully hurting oneself without conscious suicidal intent -- is relatively common among Iraq and Afghanistan veterans, and it is a strong risk factor for suicidal behavior, according to research.
Posted: 08 May 2015 06:14 AM PDT
A new locator feature on a search and rescue tool can pinpoint the location of a victim to within about five feet – saving rescuers time and increasing chances for locating survivors.
Posted: 08 May 2015 05:26 AM PDT
Scientists have come a step closer to understanding why people exposed to household air pollution (HAP) are at higher risk of lung infections such as pneumonia and tuberculosis. Three billion people worldwide are exposed to HAP from the fuels they burn to cook, light and heat with at home. Frequently, charcoal, wood and food waste are burned and generate high concentrations of smoke particles. This exposure is associated with increased risk of pneumonia, particularly in low and middle income countries where bacterial pneumonia is the biggest cause of infant mortality. This risk is well known, but the reasons are not.
Posted: 08 May 2015 05:26 AM PDT
A revolutionary ‘smart’ cane enabling the visually impaired to instantly identify friends and family could be available soon, thanks to students at a British university. The ‘XploR’ mobility cane uses smartphone technology to recognize familiar faces from up to 10 metres away. The cane also features GPS functionality to aid navigation.
Posted: 08 May 2015 05:26 AM PDT
The ability that some people have to use echoes to determine the position of an otherwise silent object, in a similar way to bats and dolphins, requires good high-pitch hearing in both ears, according to new research. This builds on recent research that demonstrated conclusively that some sighted and blind people could use echoes in this way. What wasn't clear until now was how important high-frequency hearing in both ears is.
Posted: 08 May 2015 05:23 AM PDT
People with PTSD may also be at risk for accelerated aging or premature senescence, research suggests. The researchers noted that there has not been another study that links PTSD, a psychological disorder with no established genetic basis, to a basic biological process such as aging.
Posted: 07 May 2015 06:29 PM PDT
Scientists have identified a protein on the surface of human red blood cells that serves as an essential entry point for invasion by the malaria parasite. This discovery opens up a promising new avenue for the development of therapies to treat and prevent malaria
Posted: 07 May 2015 11:50 AM PDT
Newly evolved genes can rapidly assume control over fundamental functions during early embryonic development. The findings suggest that evolutionary changes to the genetics of fundamental biological processes occur more frequently than previously thought.









































FDA  inspectors report long list of problems at Blue Bell plants Inspection teams from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration reported numerous problems after recent visits to three production facilities owned and operated by Blue Bell Creameries The company announced that it was recalling all products (ice cream, frozen yogurt, sherbet and frozen desserts) manufactured at all of its plants after receiving positive Listeria...
New form of DNA modification may carry inheritable information The surprising discovery and function of a new DNA modification in insects, worms, and algae has been described in a new article
’Super-cool' way to deliver drugs Some substances, when they undergo a process called 'rapid-freezing' or 'supercooling,' remain in liquid form -- even at below-freezing temperatures. A new study is the first to break down the rules governing the complex process of crystallization through rapid-cooling. Its findings may revolutionize the delivery of drugs in the human body, providing a way to 'freeze' the drugs at an optimal time and location in the body.
Negative regulator of natural killer cell maturation discovered A new study has identified a regulatory pathway in natural killer cells that inhibits their maturation and homing behavior. Natural killer cells are one of the body's first lines of defense against viruses and cancer. The findings could lead to new strategies for boosting natural-killer cell activity against cancer and viral infections, scientists say.
Employers and workers can join forces to keep diabetes under control People with diabetes who enroll in a health plan tailored to their medical condition are more likely to stick to their medication and actively take charge of their own health care, research into the effectiveness of the Diabetes Health Plan finds.












































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